Voices

You will look in vain for an ode to broccoli. And that is because broccoli is rubbish

We will fight them on the beaches...

Benidorm introduces tough new rules aimed at out-of-control tourists in attempt to become a Unesco World Heritage Site

Lover of Unreason: The Life and Tragic Death of Assia Wevill, By Yehuda Koren and Eilat Negev

The excruciatingly painful end of this fascinating biography – Assia Wevill would gas herself and Shura, her daughter by Ted Hughes, to death – overshadows everything we can learn about this unfortunate woman, even as we fantasize, as with all suicides, that we can still save her somehow before the last page and rewrite her story.

Selected Poems, By Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

This stunning Northern Irish poet is easily on a par with famous Seamus

Covert Stories: Water Cumbrian Literature Festival; Gore Vidal; The Friday Project

* For those within striking distance of the Lake District, the annual Words by the Water Cumbrian Literature Festival kicks off today for 10 days, on the shores of the lake at Keswick. Wordsworth is, of course, on the menu – so, too, Bob Dylan. There's a good deal of poetry in fact, including Blake Morrison, Alice Oswald, Sean O'Brien and Sylvia Plath, but the wide-ranging programme includes Roy Hattersley, Maggi Hambling, Mary Warnock and Lynne Truss. There's also a rare chance to hear Dr Rosalind Rawnsley, granddaughter of Canon Rawnsley, co-founder of the National Trust, in the Rawnsley family home, in a room designed by the Canon. Full details of the Festival at www.wordsbythewater.org.uk

Mad, Bad and Sad, by Lisa Appignanesi

From chains to couches

Rachel Howard: How To Disappear Completely, Haunch of Venison, London

A voyage to the dark side

Make war, not peace: Mitchell attacks Joan 'break your legs' Baez

Joni Mitchell and Joan Baez may have strummed their way through the golden age of the peaceniks, preaching love and tolerance, but it seems that, behind the scenes, the sisterhood of the flower power era was riven by more base instincts.

BOOKS: BUILDING A LIBRARY: Mad women

Like everyone's book shelves, mine have boundaries, categories and subdivisions visible only to myself. Books I read in a particular place, books that were all given to me by a certain person. As a rule, I usually keep fiction and non-fiction separate, except for one row of books on a high shelf.

Wintering, by Kate Moses

Ruth Padel finds a drowsy numbness in a novel of Sylvia and Ted

On Not Being Able to Sleep: psychoanalysis and the modern world, by Jacqueline Rose

A daughter of Freud gets to grips with shame

Arts: Theatre: A long day's journey into nightmare

THE ORESTEIA COTTESLOE ROYAL NATIONAL THEATRE LONDON

Books: Order and comfort in an unruly world

Time to be in Earnest: a fragment of autobiography by P D James Faber pounds 16.99
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Ben Little, right, is a Labour supporter while Jonathan Rogers supports the Green Party
general election 2015
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The 91st Hakone Ekiden Qualifier at Showa Kinen Park, Tokyo, 2014
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Life and Style
Former helicopter pilot Major Tim Peake will become the first UK astronaut in space for over 20 years
food + drinkNothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
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Kim Wilde began gardening in the 1990s when she moved to the countryside
peopleThe singer is leading an appeal for the charity Thrive, which uses the therapy of horticulture
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Alexis Sanchez celebrates scoring a second for Arsenal against Reading
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An easy-peel potato; Dave Hax has come up with an ingenious method in food preparation
voicesDave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
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Japan's population is projected to fall dramatically in the next 50 years (Wikimedia)
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Buyers of secondhand cars are searching out shades last seen in cop show ‘The Sweeney’
motoringFlares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
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Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own