Voices

You will look in vain for an ode to broccoli. And that is because broccoli is rubbish

Theatre: Death... and the very peculiar maiden

I'LL BE TED, YOU BE SYLVIA HAMPSTEAD THEATRE LONDON

The Information on: Kiki Smith

Who Is She?

Film: Shakespeare goes to the prom

The Big Picture

Words: scrim, n.

IT WOULD be a writer so cavalier as not to be a writer at all that scorned the novelist and editor Sol Stein's recent book Solutions For Writers. Much more than a manual, it offers sense and wit on every page, and cites many authors, both well-known and others, "whose names hide behind the scrim of time".

Poet saluted in his own write

THE VOICE of Ted Hughes, the late Poet Laureate, echoed around Westminster Abbey yesterday, with the poignant, and prescient lines: "Golden lads and girls all must/ As chimney sweepers, come to dust."

Ted Hughes wins Whitbread prize

THE LATE POET laureate Ted Hughes received his second posthumous award in as many days yesterday. His collection of poems about his relationship with Sylvia Plath, Birthday Letters, won the 1998 Whitbread Poetry Award only 24 hours after it won the T S Eliot Prize.

Hughes wins top poetry award

THE LATE TED Hughes, the former poet laureate who died last October, was last night named as the winner of the T S Eliot Prize for poetry.

Dylan was my mother's ruin

She was known as the drunken wife of Dylan Thomas. Now Caitlin's son aims to rescue his mother's reputation.

Books: A catcher of the wry

Victoria Radin logs on for a witty and ambitious critique of pure reason

Ted Hughes listed for top poetry prizes

A WEEK after the Poet Laureate's death, Birthday Letters by Ted Hughes has been shortlisted for two of the country's leading poetry prizes. Yesterday, Hughes's final work, which has already won the Forward Prize, was named as a contender for the Whitbread Poetry Award. The T S Eliot Prize had placed it on their shortlist a few days earlier.

Cultural Comment: Monitor: The range of tributes to the late Poet Laureate Ted Hughes - as seen by the newspapers

NOT ONLY did this imposing, craggily handsome Yorkshireman look the part - more so than any Laureate since Tennyson - but he used the post to continue on a more public stage his campaign for the imagination and against what he saw as our despiritualised and disembodied civilisation. Hughes's concern with the environment puts him in the mainstream of much modern thought. His belief that the women's movement reflected the unleashing of primeval forces was a little more eccentric, though. But raising one's eyebrows at the wider reaches of his thought seems as irrelevant as noting his archaic and ardent royalism. These things were as necessary to his imagination as the spirit-world was to Yeats, and his best work rises free of them.

Hughes: my guilt over Plath

THE POET Laureate, Ted Hughes, who died on Thursday, believed he was seen as "an undesirable person" and that his life had been blighted by a public misunderstanding of his relationship with his first wife, the novelist and poet Sylvia Plath.

Ted Hughes: 1930-1998: A poet pinned and wriggling

The day of his death was a dark cold day. Auden's great elegy for Yeats might have been written with last Wednesday and Thursday in mind, when the shattering news of Ted Hughes's death broke. Black storm clouds covered the entire country. Torrential rain and hail beat down, gales blasted autumn trees, the rivers he loved were in spate everywhere, drowning fields and villages, as if in grief.

Monitor: In memoriam

Tributes to the life and work of Ted Hughes, Poet Laureate

The hawk who held `creation in a weightless quiet'

With his first four books, Hughes changed British poetry, shooting into it a new charge of energy
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