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You will look in vain for an ode to broccoli. And that is because broccoli is rubbish

Why Hughes broke silence

ADMIRERS of the poet Sylvia Plath expressed surprise yesterday at the revelation that the poet laureate Ted Hughes has written a series of confessional poems about his relationship with his late wife.

Arts: Hughes breaks silence with secret poems to Sylvia Plath

The Poet Laureate, Ted Hughes, today breaks his silence over the life and suicide of his first wife, Sylvia Plath, with a volume of poems that few knew existed. Clare Garner reports on the poetic account of his days with Plath.

The agony and the ideal aunt

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Pick Of The Year

Books

Books: The first victim of a lazy lunatic?

Carole Morin on the Fuhrer's sweetheart; Hitler and Geli by Ronald Hayman, Bloomsbury, pounds 16.99

`The other Dimbleby' works on sculpture of Sylvia Plath

David and Jonathan's brother plans a college memorial to the poet, writes Ros Wynne-Jones

Obituary: Murray Kempton

Murray Kempton, who is now dead but always seemed mythical, was a gentle and learned man who believed, like his early employer H.L. Mencken, that the purpose of a newspaper was to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable, writes Rhoda Koenig [further to the obituary by Peter Pringle, 7 May].

Love you to death

Love Invents Us by Amy Bloom, Picador, pounds 15.99; Victoria Radin travels in Diaperland and meets a lethal Lolita

Filling a need and an awful lot of holes

Geoff Dyer on the slick and the dead

Poetry's unlikely heroine hates her most popular work Popular writer has more than one best-loved poem

Writer irritated by success in poll of favourite poems

why a diary is a woman's best friend

I'm afraid Mr Philip Hensher rather let his misogyny get the better of him in his recent review of Hermione Lee's new biography of Virginia Woolf in the Spectator. Although, poor dear, one can understand he was under some strain, since reading the book has clearly been a long exercise - 900 pages - in discovering things he didn't want to know. Like what Woolf was wearing when she first met Madge Garland (something that looked like "an upturned wastepaper basket on her head"), when she had her ears pierced and "God help us, what she used for sanitary towels."

Literary lifers: the good, the bad and the nosey

Are literary biographers driven by envy? Tonight's Bookmark suggests life-writing is fuelled by corrupt impulses. Peter Parker disagrees

Web poets' society

Aspiring Byrons are turning to the Net, says John O'Mahony

33 years on, a new book by Sylvia Plath

THIRTY-three years after her suicide, Sylvia Plath's publishers are trumpeting a "new" book by the controversial poet. The It Doesn't Matter Suit, a children's story found among the poet's papers at the Lilly Library in Indiana University, has created a buzz of excitement among publishers around the world.

REVIEW:Pop Alanis Morissette Subterrania, London

The story goes that Madonna's debut gig in London was snubbed by most of the journalists who now claim to have been in attendance. So let me get in here quick: I was at the first British show of the 20-year- old Canadian singer Alanis Morissette last week. The connection isn't entirely spurious - Morissette has been signed up by the Queen of Pop for her record label, Maverick. And she, too, is fast gaining notoriety more for her provocative nature than her music: the risque lyrics to her song "You Oughta Know" - "Is she perverted like me?/ Would she go down on you in a theatre?" - precede her everywhere, not least when she feels like taking in a show.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home
Lauded therapist Harley Mille still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Lauded therapist still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Australian Harley Miller is as frustrated by court delays as she is with the idiosyncrasies of immigration law
Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world. But could his predictions of war do the same?

Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world...

But could his predictions of war do the same?
Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs: 'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs
Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities, but why?

Young at hort

Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities. But why are so many people are swapping sweaty clubs for leafy shrubs?
Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award: 'making a quip as funny as possible is an art'

Beyond a joke

Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award, has nigh-on 200 in his act. So how are they conceived?
The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

Sadly though, the Lawrence of Arabia star is not around to lend his own critique
Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire: The joy of camping in a wetland nature reserve and sleeping under the stars

A wild night out

Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire offers a rare chance to camp in a wetland nature reserve