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Could this have been an act of sabotage by the outraged burghers of bucolic Stedham, deep in the Sussex countryside?

Fishing: Farewell to a master of rhythm, rhyme and rainbow trout

THE PAPERS will be full of Ted Hughes this weekend. Ted the literary genius; Ted - Poet Laureate; Ted, ex-husband of Sylvia Plath. But I never knew him as any of these things very much. To me, Ted Hughes was much more interesting than just being a poet. Ted was a fisherman.

Monitor: In memoriam

Tributes to the life and work of Ted Hughes, Poet Laureate

Ted Hughes, Poet Laureate: born 1930, died 1998

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Ted Hughes: 1930 - 1998 Praise for a `creative genius'

TED HUGHES was hailed yesterday as a creative genius, a man whose verses evoked an extraordinary vision of England. Poets and politicians alike spoke of the gaping hole in British literary life following Hughes's death from cancer on Wednesday.

Ted Hughes: 1930 - 1998 The god of granite who could shatter stones with plain words

MY FIRST, and most recent, exposure to the flinty and percussive rhythms of Ted Hughes's verse both came in settings a world away from the classroom or the armchair. This morning, that point deserves some stress. For this often secretive and embattled man did more than anyone since Tennyson to give great English verse a deep public presence. His impact in the air and on the tongue far outweighs the formal honours symbolised by his accession to the thankless role of Poet Laureate in 1984.

Ted Hughes wins pounds 10,000 poetry prize

TED HUGHES, the Poet Laureate, continued his marvellous year last night when his book Birthday Letters won the pounds 10,000 Forward Prize for the best collection of 1998.

Lyrical Ballads by unlikely lads

200 years ago Wordsworth and Coleridge revolutionised poetry. Now what? asks William Scammell

First Night: Rigg shakes and stirs with desire

First Night: Phedre, Albery Theatre London

Theatre: The mother of all dramas

Racine, Euripides, Benjamin Britten, Stevie Smith and Sarah Kane have all fallen for Phaedra,

The other Diana effect, on the Almeida

IF Diana Rigg's last two performances under Jonathan Kent's direction are anything to go by, then the Almeida's new production of Racine's Phedre will be well worth a visit, assuming you can get a ticket. Over the last six years, Dame Rigg (above, in full tragic mode) and Jonathan Kent (artistic director of the Almeida) have collaborated on a series of ventures, all of which have reaped rich rewards. Medea in 1992 finished up on Broadway with a Tony award. Then four years later, the same team produced Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? at the Almeida, and Mother Courage and Her Children at the National. Rigg scooped the Evening Standard Best Actress award for both.

Order of Merit for Ted Hughes, poet to the Queen

POET LAUREATE Ted Hughes has been granted the Order of Merit at the personal request of the Queen.

Free verse joins the free market

Tuesday Book; THE DEREGULATED MUSE BY SEAN O'BRIEN, BLOODAXE BOOKS, pounds 10.95

Ted Hughes scores hat-trick of awards

The Poet Laureate, Ted Hughes, yesterday completed an extraordinary comeback when his Tales from Ovid picked up the 40th W H Smith Literary Award, worth pounds 10,000, writes Boyd Tonkin, Literary Editor.

Review: Nation notion

London Sinfonietta/State of the Nation Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

Arts: Hughes breaks silence with secret poems to Sylvia Plath

The Poet Laureate, Ted Hughes, today breaks his silence over the life and suicide of his first wife, Sylvia Plath, with a volume of poems that few knew existed. Clare Garner reports on the poetic account of his days with Plath.
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