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The name of Donald Byrd means different things to different generations of music listeners. For those who prize the mainstream jazz of the 1950s and 1960s, he was a gifted trumpeter and one of the best practitioners of "hard-bop". But he reached a far wider audience in the 1970s, by aligning himself with the soul and funk music of the day, achieving huge sales, especially with the album Black Byrd. He was also possessed of a huge intellectual energy, and pursued an academic career in parallel with his musical one, taking lecturing jobs from the 1960s on.

Stan Fracey, Barbican, London

Longevity is not particularly associated with the lifestyle of a jazz musician, especially one who has played smoke-filled clubs and lounges regularly through the decades: a minority have pushed beyond threescore years and ten. Which gives us at least one reason to be cheerful: Stan Tracey, at 81, is still vibrantly with us and can fill the Barbican with people who know his worth.

CLASSICAL MUSIC: THE FIVE BEST CONCERTS

BBC NO of Wales tonight

Thursday Book: The music of the mavericks

THE BIRTH OF BEBOP: A SOCIAL AND MUSICAL HISTORY BY SCOTT DEVEAUX, PICADOR, pounds 20

Monk-like devotion

ANDY SUMMERS PIZZA EXPRESS LONDON

THE CRITICS: JAZZ: The man with the horn of plenty

Dave Douglas Cheltenham Jazz Festival Jan Gabarek/Hilliard Ensemble King's College Chapel, Cambridge

Arts: This one's from the heart

Tom Waits is a man out of sync. With his pie-eyed bar-room ballads and primal bone-banging, he's always stood at odds with the music industry. Now he's back with a magnificent new album and tall tales from the wild wood. Anyone for a banana slug? By Barney Hoskyns

Arts: Jazz; In your own time...

CHELTENHAM INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL

Thursday books: Jazz blowing hot and cool

VISIONS OF JAZZ: THE FIRST CENTURY

Jazz: She swings like a mother

Geri Allen is a jazz pianist at the top of her profession, but she's not the first woman to get there.

Jazz: Big sounds for the small screen

Putting music on television has always been difficult. Putting jazz on television has often proved impossible. Can a new Channel 4 series do it justice?

Jazz: This isn't jazz. This is just terrible telly

"WELCOME to Jazz Club. Nice!" In the wake of The Fast Show's wickedly funny skit in which a bouffant-haired, Seventies-suited compere introduces incomprehensible acts with self-regarding, in-for-a-dig asides to-camera ("Amazing!"), Jazz 606 (BBC 2, Wed) was always going to have a hard time taking itself seriously. If only they'd been bold enough to get Jazz Club's fictitious frontman to present their own programme, the format could maybe have worked. As it is, the series (two down, four to go) is unlikely to please either committed fans or the promiscuous channel- surfers it's probably aimed at. And let's face it, even an actor in a bad wig would be preferable to the presenter they have chosen to go with, the Mancunian poet Lemn Sissay.

Jazz: A kind of magnum music that made Clint's day

"Ladies and gentlemen, I'm Clint Eastwood, and I love jazz." So begins old Stoneface's brief and humble oration towards the end of the double-CD, Eastwood After Hours, a remarkable recording of a Carnegie Hall concert held in the actor and director's honour in October last year, and released on his own Malpaso label (via Warner Brothers). What makes the album so special is not the reaching out of jazz to Eastwood or vice versa, but rather the fact that the whole enterprise is so damn good.

Music - Jazz: Capturing the real stuff on the hoof

A young jazz enthusiast who made illicit recordings of John Coltrane's live sets in the 1940s harnessed the spirit of a movement. That pursuit of spontaneity is what makes a new jazz CD collection so covetable.

Jazz: Caresser of the Welsh dresser

The appeal of Barbara Dennerlein, who headlined at Ronnie Scott's all last week, is at least partly that of Beauty and the Beast. Wan, willowy and ever so demure, she's clearly Beauty, while the Beast is the cut- down Welsh dresser of her Hammond organ. With a princess's hair streaming behind her, Dennerlein coaxes growls, squeaks and outright moans from the mahogany monster while somehow managing to keep an impeccable poker- face throughout. It's like Leda and the Swan, only with foot-pedals.

JAZZ PORTRAITS

"Thelonious Monk is my God. Miles Davis I revere," murmurs John Bull. "I love all jazz, but I didn't expect to get caught up in it for quite so long," confides the artist, who has spent the last six years painting his musical heroes. This week, an exhibition of his work opens in London, with portraits of jazz legends such as Billie Holiday and John Coltrane illustrating his penchant for the golden age of 1950s New York.
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