Life and Style Only 3.4 per cent of the Solihull area is covered by housing

It isn’t hard to find an architect who will tell you that vast swathes of the British urban landscape are ugly, grey and unappealing – nor would you struggle to find people who agreed with them. But could it be that the look and the layout of our cities is actually bad for our health?

Law Reports: Case Summaries; 19 April 1999

Law Reports

Enterprise Issues: GEM of an idea for the modern market-place

ONE OF the many intriguing aspects of new information and telecommunications technologies is their scope for creating entirely new types of work. An example is the growth of telephone counselling: busy and stressed-out professionals can call a sympathetic listener, who will give them advice about how to get through difficult meeting or deal with career problems.

Goodbye Berkshire, hello Readingstoke

A CITY THAT doesn't yet exist is the focus of the latest battle in the war for the soul of rural England. Now it's a drawing in the developer's office; but soon it could be Readingstoke - a sprawling metropolis created by concreting over the countryside between Reading in Berkshire and Basingstoke in Hampshire.

Tuesday Law Report: Quarrying conditions are 'development consent'

16 February 1999 R v North Yorkshire County Council, ex p Brown and another House of Lords (Lord Nicholls of Birkenhead, Lord Goff of Chieveley, Lord Jauncey of Tullichettle, Lord Lloyd of Berwick, Lord Hoffmann) 11 February 1999

Quackery or good sense?

University lecturers are worried by new job evaluation proposals.

Listen: it's a brainstorm

It is no longer news that Radio 4 is, as the dismal saying goes, "dumbing down". But last week's papers were once again full of gleeful attacks on the hapless controller, James Boyle, whose most important news programme, Today, had suffered a slump of 17 per cent in the latest quarterly audience figures. But this time there was an intriguing new twist to the saga. Word seeped out that at a Christmas party a group of pals - the writers Tariq Ali and Howard Brenton, the music critic Dominic Gill and the composer Michael Nyman - had hatched a plan to set up a rival station for the intellectually ambitious. It would be called Radio Einstein, and it would be "unashamedly" elitist. A "modern version of the old Third Programme", it would operate on the assumption that "kids are not stupid".

Case Summaries: 18 January 1999

THE FOLLOWING notes of judgments were prepared by the reporters of the All England Law Reports.

The arts in 1999: Exhibitions

I feel that the New Year never really starts until the clocks go forward (this year, on the 28 March) - a bright day in the calendar that ought to be, but never is, the subject of poetry. The art season used to begin at much the same time as the clocks changed, and last until November. Nowadays, as with football and other previously seasonal activities, there's pressure all year long.

Late closing will reduce crime, say ministers

EUROPEANS HAVE always been bemused by our arcane licensing laws whenever they feel like a late lunch or a drink after the theatre. The police, too, have found closing time problematic as they deal with the nightly bouts of drunken violent crime after last orders.

Erica Jong, Naomi Wolf and Nancy Friday: three women and a website

The green room: Where Every Surfer Wants To Be

Books: No Smoke without fire

A History of London

Case Summaries: 5 October1998

The following notes of judgments were prepared by the reporters of the All England Law Reports.

Letter: Change of planning

Letter:

Obituary: Baroness Denington

NOT MANY of us are left to recall the golden evening in 1945 when the new victorious Labour councillors gathered in St Pancras Town Hall, in north London. We were a motley-looking crew: firemen from the station in Euston Road still in uniform, air raid wardens still wearing theirs - economising no doubt on precious coupons for other things - and a few baggy demob suits. And scarcely any nylons among the girls.

Letter: Battle of the Mall

Letter:
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – Five-star MS Swiss Corona 7 nights from £999pp
Lake Como St Moritz & the Bernina Express 7 nights from £809pp
Vietnam
Lake Maggiore, Orta & the Matterhorn 7 nights from £939pp
South Africa
Spain
Prices correct as of 19 December 2014
Isis in Iraq: Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment by militants

'Jilan killed herself in the bathroom. She cut her wrists and hanged herself'

Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment
Ed Balls interview: 'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'

Ed Balls interview

'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'
He's behind you, dude!

US stars in UK panto

From David Hasselhoff to Jerry Hall
Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz: What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?

Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz

What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?
Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Planet’s surface is inhospitable to humans but 30 miles above it is almost perfect
Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history - clocks, rifles, frogmen’s uniforms and colonial helmets

Clocks, rifles, swords, frogmen’s uniforms

Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history
Return to Gaza: Four months on, the wounds left by Israel's bombardment have not yet healed

Four months after the bombardment, Gaza’s wounds are yet to heal

Kim Sengupta is reunited with a man whose plight mirrors the suffering of the Palestinian people
Gastric surgery: Is it really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Is gastric surgery really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Critics argue that it’s crazy to operate on healthy people just to stop them eating
Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction Part 2 - now LIVE

Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction

Bid on original art, or trips of a lifetime to Africa or the 'Corrie' set, and help Homeless Veterans
Pantomime rings the changes to welcome autistic theatre-goers

Autism-friendly theatre

Pantomime leads the pack in quest to welcome all
The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

Sony suffered a chorus of disapproval after it withdrew 'The Interview', but it's not too late for it to take a stand, says Joan Smith
From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?

Panto dames: before and after

From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?
Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Booksellers say readers are turning away from dark modern thrillers and back to the golden age of crime writing
Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best,' says founder of JustGiving

Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best'

Ten million of us have used the JustGiving website to donate to good causes. Its co-founder says that being dynamic is as important as being kind
The botanist who hunts for giant trees at Kew Gardens

The man who hunts giants

A Kew Gardens botanist has found 25 new large tree species - and he's sure there are more out there