Life and Style Only 3.4 per cent of the Solihull area is covered by housing

It isn’t hard to find an architect who will tell you that vast swathes of the British urban landscape are ugly, grey and unappealing – nor would you struggle to find people who agreed with them. But could it be that the look and the layout of our cities is actually bad for our health?

Education: Management: The man from the Tory test-bed with lessons for an old Labour stronghold

Casting off its image of industrial decline, Newcastle is now experiencing its own feel-good factor. Paul Gosling meets the city council's young new chief, who aims to blend radical management methods with a touch of new Labour humanity.

Letter: Stratford was blitzed by urban planners

I am afraid Lilian Pizzichini is wrong on two counts ("Cinema Paradiso - in east London", 5 October). For much of this century, up to the early 1960s, Stratford had three cinemas - the Rex, Gaumont, and Century - all later put to other uses: bingo hall, gym and entertainment centre, among others.

Clean living

Until fairly recently in Port Sunlight, crime was someone stealing your roses ... Sophie Campbell visits the model village built for Lord Leverhulme's soap factory workers.

CASE SUMMARIES: 6 OCTOBER 1997

The following notes of judgments were prepared by the reporters of the All England Law Reports.

CINEMA PARADISO - IN EAST LONDON BUILDINGS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY; THE STRATFORD PICTURE HOUSE, E15, AND THE LUX CINEMA, N1

For a century, Stratford has had a theatre - but no cinema. The new Picture House was worth waiting for, says Lilian Pizzichini

Redrow chairman warns on rocketing house prices

Redrow, the Cheshire-based builder with a reputation for accurately predicting the housing market, has turned cautious on London house prices. And, as its own profits soar, it sees no sign of a boom. Magnus Grimond reports.

Obituary: Dr Patrick Fergusson

Patrick Fergusson was one of the last of the old-fashioned central London GPs. He had qualified as a doctor before the National Health Service Act of 1946, and delivered a particular, bespoke care that smacks now of another age; and, having established himself before the 1960s property boom drove so many London doctors to commute from the city's outer reaches, he lived, ever available, over his shop.

Cover story: Ideal homes

Fifty years old this year, Britain's New Towns have come of age. Europe sees them as an answer to urban ghettoes and Hong Kong Chinese are flocking in. Nonie Niesewand celebrates a time when new Labour built a brave new world. Photographs by Adrian White

Bombay's first crack at freedom

The stained glass of George Gilbert Scott's university building was at the receiving end on the stroke of midnight. Victoria was laid low. Fifty years on will she rise again?

Shattered City church set to rise from ashes

The resurrection of St Ethelburga's, the medieval City of London church shattered by the IRA's Bishopsgate bomb, moved a step closer yesterday ,with the appointment of architects for a pounds 3m rebuilding scheme, 14 months after a concrete-and-glass design was rejected.

Homes review poses threat to green belt

Michael Meacher, the Minister for the Environment, yesterday said the Government would save the English countryside from destruction by urban sprawl as more than 4 million new households are formed in the next 20 years.

Planners' vote to be rerun

The director of the Town and Country Planning Association has resigned amid allegations of ballot rigging which have forced the rerun of elections to its board, writes Louise Jury.

Biters bit as NY puts pit bulls in the doghouse

David Usborne New York

CONCRETE JUNGLES TEEM WITH LIFE

Shortly before dawn on an empty road, a fox slinks into the beam of my headlights. I brake hard. The fox's eyes glisten green and in an instant it is gone into a hedge. But this is no quiet country lane. It is a main road in west London.

LAW REPORT 4 June 1997: Validity of notice to be challenged by judicial review

Regina v Wicks; House of Lords (Lord Browne-Wilkinson, Lord Jauncey of Tullichettle, Lord Nicholls of Birkenhead, Lord Hoffman and Lord Hope of Craighead) 21 May 1997
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