News In other news ... Jon Snow performed at last year's Newsroom's Got Talent charity event

The veteran Channel 4 host let readers in on the inner workings of his mind – and it’s not as laundered as one might have thought

Celebrating future art stars

The Catlin Art Prize and the guide to emerging art

The shock of the new Turner winner

Not a cow's brain in sight as veteran contender Richard Wright scoops prize. But is it art or is it wallpaper?

Award-winning Scottish artist turns his back on homeland

He is a Turner-prize winning artist who has represented Britain at the Venice Biennale and made an award-winning film capturing the athletic beauty and grace of the French footballer, Zinedine Zidane.

Last Night's Television: Big Top, BBC 1<br />The Man Behind the Masquerade, BBC4

Big Top, a new sitcom set in a travelling circus, is one of those programmes that get you wondering about the commissioning process. You'll need something to entertain you while it's on and speculating about the way it came into being will do as well as anything, unless you've got a dog that's overdue for a combing or some socks to pair up. One assumes that the performers' names came first on the pitch document. One certainly hopes that they came first on the pitch document, since the idea that it was sold on the essential concept and a sample of the writing seems implausible, to say the least. We've thought of a vehicle for Amanda Holden, somebody said, and what's more it's a role that will make it feasible for her to wear hotpants and black stockings nearly all the time. And if you bite there's a good chance that we can bolt on John Thompson, Tony Robinson and Ruth Madoc. How's that for belt-and-braces coverage? Cold Feet, Blackadder and a dab of Hi-De-Hi! behind the ears.

Observations: Gavin Turk and Paula Rego take on torture

Some of Britain's most prominent contemporary artists have donated works to the Medical Foundation Art Auction, whose proceeds will support the victims of torture.

Hape shapes up to put Rec back in reckoning

Kiwi league centre has been eased in gradually but now's the time to stand out

A brand new Creed: The Turner prize-winner turns choreographer

Martin Creed is creating a ballet for Sadler's Wells. Zo&#235; Anderson watches the artist rehearse his latest work in the dance studio

Rosalind Nashabishi/ Richard Wright, ICA/ Gagosian Gallery, London

Lights, camera, action... almost

Turner Prize 2009, Tate Britain, London

This year&rsquo;s shortlistees bring a welcome return to solemnity and skill &ndash; and not a condom in sight

Turner Prize exhibition unveiled

A whale's skull, a heap of dust made up of the remains of a jet engine and a workman's naked backside are among the artworks featuring in a display by this year's shortlisted Turner Prize artists.

Tom Lubbock: This year's Turner Prize foursome share common ground

The job of the Turner Prize jury isn’t just to come up with four lively and upcoming artists. They’ve also got to come up with four reasonably distinct ones. These artists will appear in a show together for three months, and a stream of visitors will be invited to compare them. It’s important that they are able to tell the difference between the entries.

Our Magnolia, Nashashibi/Skaer, Doggerfisher, Edinburgh

What do photos of Margaret Thatcher, a washed-up carcass, footage of an American passenger plane and a painting by Paul Nash have in common? They are among the images in Our Magnolia, a 16mm film created by Turner prize-nominated Lucy Skaer and former Beck's Futures winner Rosalind Nashashibi. It's their fifth collaboration and, though both studied at Glasgow School of Art, their first solo show in Scotland, and at a mere four and a half minutes it doesn't demand much of your time. It does, however, test your interpretative skills in its seemingly obscure references and associations.

Bruce delighted as his Turner prize helps harrowing of Hull

Sunderland 4 Hull City 1

On cloud nine: Turner Prize-winner Keith Tyson reveals the surprising ideas behind his mind-bending work

You could say that, at first sight, the work of the artist Keith Tyson is simply inexplicable. But that's not strictly true: some of his paintings even come with explanations attached – although to understand them, it might help to have a grasp of algebra. Why does a sombre canvas resembling a Dutch still-life – with fruit, stuffed animals and a skull – also contain a brightly coloured toy cash register? The answer lies in a mathematical formula inscribed under the picture: pluses, minuses and a sigma symbol, along with the words "Retailer" and "Memento Mori". In another recent Tyson, tea has been splattered over a facsimile page from an 1841 book on popular folly and manias. Precisely how much tea (10 pints) and how it has been applied (in a spiral pattern) are determined by the equation below the picture.

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