Private universities: Why it pays to take the path less travelled

A budding sector that boosts prospects for those who know what they want. By Stephen Hoare

Gap Years: All the inspiration you need to take a break

A well-planned and productive gap year can launch your career in the right direction. By Russ Thorne

There's never been a better time to head abroad for your studies

Rising fees at home have made other countries a tempting destination for UK students. By Stephen Hoare

A brief guide to looking after yourself properly at university

Independence means it is time to take care of yourself - and others

Swap one island lifestyle for another

Head to the Caribbean to enrol on a course that could change your life, writes Simon Midgeley

Distance learning: Find your answers closer to home

Save money without compromising on quality by studying off-campus, writes Steve McCormack

Letter from the editor: A vicious downward spiral

Today, there will be some extremely nerve-jangled households.

A glorious climate makes Spain particularly appealing

Spain has a lot to offer aspiring medical or dental students. Entry requirements tend to be slightly lower than they are in the UK, and it usually costs less to live there. Yet that doesn’t mean you’ll receive a poorer education. Spain offers advanced teaching facilities in modern universities, courses taught in English, and the chance to experience Spanish culture first-hand.

Drugs could cleanse brain of bad memories

Fears about how drugs manipulate a person's memory are overblown, claims law professor Adam Kolber

University fees may fall as students hold out for a better deal

200,000 of this year's A-level candidates are expected to miss out on a university place this year

Richard Garner: A-level grading system that needs reform

For the past decade or so there has been endless debate about whether we should move to a system whereby A-level candidates apply to universities after receiving their results.

Crisis deepens for UK's young

One person in five in 16-to-24 age group is unemployed as record numbers to miss out on university places

The Business On... Andrew Formica, Chief executive, Henderson

He looks like a happy chap

Two-year degree courses would ease student debt

Two-year degree courses could soon be the norm for students after the trebling of tuition fees next year, says a report published today. The new courses would cost students less without reducing the amount of teaching time they received, the independent think tank CentreForum said.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent