Women face 70-year wait for top jobs equality

It will take 70 years to achieve parity between men and women in the country's top jobs, according to a report released today by the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

Two-year degree courses would ease student debt

Two-year degree courses could soon be the norm for students after the trebling of tuition fees next year, says a report published today. The new courses would cost students less without reducing the amount of teaching time they received, the independent think tank CentreForum said.

But what if you've got better grades than you expected?

So you've done better than you thought - which means you've got options

If at first you don't succeed, try, try, and try again

Missed out on your dream course? Don't despair - you may still be able to bag a place, says Jessica Moore

Leading article: Perverse effects of higher fees

The £9,000 annual fees being introduced by many universities may change the face of higher education far more radically than has yet been envisaged. Not only could it persuade many more school-leavers, especially from poorer families, to stay at home and combine study with paid work. It could also leave some universities struggling, as students choose a more American-style route. They might, for instance, opt for a cheaper foundation course at a local college, before moving on to a better-known university to complete a degree.

Reforms will hit middle-ranking universities

A dramatic shift in higher-education provision with middle-ranking universities struggling to survive is predicted today by the head of one of the country's biggest exam boards.

Sit-in students get their way after six-month protest

Jubilant students at Glasgow University were celebrating a victory last night after one of the longest sit-ins in British history.

Call for 'sixth pillar' for EBaac

Music experts today launched a fresh appeal for the Government to revamp its flagship English Baccalaureate to include creative and cultural subjects.

There's plenty of support and advice available to freshers

For many parents, the day their child goes to university is also the first time they have left home. Under any circumstances, that can be daunting, but when it takes them away from their home town, it can seem overwhelming, particularly at the moment you drop off your son or daughter and wave goodbye.

Parents splash the cash for ultimate student pads

Barely a minute’s walk from Spitalfields market and a stone’s throw from Liverpool Street station is London’s newest private student apartment block. Nido Spitalfields is a 33-storey steel and glass tower among a maze of Victorian warehouse conversions and bars.

The secrets to staying happy after your child heads off to university

Everything changes when a student leaves home - but it’s not always for the worse, says Kate Hilpern

How to help manage the costs of university life

Budgets matter but communication is vital, especially with the cost of studying going up, says Justine East

The steps to take to make everything fall into place

Our guide to Clearing will help you to pick the right institute and course for you

Study links education to millionaire numbers

Britain's ability to generate wealth will be damage by current reforms to higher eduction funding, an investment firm claims.

Blunder gives A-level students results too early

Dozens of A-level candidates received an early glimpse of their results at the weekend as a result of an exam board blunder. About 50 pupils logged on to an online service run by the Edexcel exam board after it had been mistakenly opened up five days before the results were due to be published.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

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It's oh so quiet!

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'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

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If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

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New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

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Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

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Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

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More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

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