Tottenham hit back at Karen Brady 'scaremongering'

The contest to take over the Olympic Stadium broke out into a war of words last night with Tottenham launching the first image of their design and chairman Daniel Levy condemning remarks by West Ham's Karren Brady as "scaremongering and highly irresponsible".

Editor-At-Large: Never mind the old and ill – protect the sacred wheelie bin

Eric Pickles reckons he's got his finger on the pulse of middle England. In Pickles-world, what is the single biggest issue keeping us all awake at night? Rubbish.

Councils accused of complacency over rubbish

Local councils have been accused of complacency over rubbish collection, amid growing public anger that bins in some areas have not been emptied for as long as four weeks.

Our battle to restore the Somme's unknown heroes to their families

Over the last 20 months, The Independent has published more than 400 images of Tommies, Aussies and Canadians of the period 1915-16 rescued from a rubbish skip in northern France. The images, which include many group photographs, show the faces of maybe 500 British and Empire soldiers pictured by a local French photographer – or photographers – just before and during the most murderous battle of the 1914-18 war.

The Timeline: Rubbish collection

3000 BC Ancient waste

Body of Pentagon official in landfill site

police in Delaware are investigating the murder of a former Pentagon official after his body was found in a rubbish dump.

We bin 10 Wembleys full of food a year – what a waste of energy

Wales has shown the way by collecting and reusing kitchen rubbish, but most UK councils lag behind

Victoria Summerley: We must educate the public not to use a river as a dump

My local river is the Wandle. It gives its name to Wandsworth, where I live, and anyone who has ever been through south-west London has probably crossed it without knowing, because there are long underground stretches. But whereas many Thames tributaries live secret, subterranean lives, the Wandle frequently bursts forth - through the parklands of Beddington and Morden Hall, for example.

Waste crisis means 80 giant furnaces set for go-ahead in 2011

A grassroots revolt is growing over a new generation of controversial incinerators planned across the UK, which would see the amount of household waste sent to be burnt more than double. Incinerators are currently being planned on more than 80 sites under the so-called "dash for ash".

Identified at last: faces of the Somme

One by one, the stories behind a wartime photographic archive are being unearthed. John Lichfield reports on a unique project

Michael McCarthy: What's the official line on incinerators? There isn't one

Campaigners stress this is a huge waste of money – an incinerator can cost £100m – which will be diverted from recycling

Business Diary: Death is no escape from junk mailers

You'd think in the era of electronic communication that the volume of junk "snail" mail, and the problems caused by it, would be on the wane. Not so. The Deceased Preference Service, which performs the useful service of deleting the names of dead people from mailing lists,says that 5.2 million pieces of direct mail (junk mail to you and me) will be delivered during the festive period to those who have departed this mortal coil. Quite apart from the pain these unnecessary letters might cause to recently bereaved relatives, that's enough rubbish to fill 245 dustbins. An awful lot of landfill.

The wad squad: Enterprising experts are on a quest to combat chewing gum on our pavements

Gum freshens our breath but it's a blight on city streets that costs £150m a year to shift. Surely there's a smarter way to chew?

Explosive-laden US home to be destroyed

Neighbours gasped when authorities showed them photos of the inside of the Southern California home: Crates of grenades, mason jars of white, explosive powder and jugs of volatile chemicals that are normally the domain of suicide bombers.

Investment Column: Not time to wade into Pennon's waters

Paypoint; Young & Co
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine