Sally Hunt: Energy expert who helped mastermind electricity privatisation in Britain in the 1980s

Sally Hunt was a world-renowned expert on the electricity industry who helped to mastermind the privatisation of that sector in Britain during the late 1980s – a task which many considered impossible to achieve successfully.

Stephen King: Don't let the G20 follow the League of Nations into the dustbin of history

Outlook: The biggest threat to the success of the G20 comes from the obvious point that the 'new powers' are pushing the 'old powers' to one side

Pioneering scheme rewards recyclers with high-street vouchers

Over the next year the number of people being offered Marks & Spencer vouchers and other incentives in return for recycling their waste is expected to hit the one million mark. You may not have heard of it yet, but RecycleBank looks set to spread fast.

Dad's Diary: 'There I was, conforming to the sort of gender bias I was seeking to avoid'

Nature or nurture? It's the perennial teaser that sociologists and psychologists, parents, politicians and even the police have posed when trying to understand the behaviour, or sadly more usually the misbehaviour, of young people.

Brian Viner: Why every sports fixture is a gamble

On the concourse outside Wembley Stadium on Tuesday evening, prior to England's footballers taking on 11 Montenegrins in a Euro 2012 qualifier, a gang of men in fluorescent pink bibs busied themselves picking up litter. The bibs bore the words "Wembley Stadium – Waste Management" and a couple of hours later, following a sterile 0-0 draw, it didn't seem overly cynical to conclude that the waste management operation might have been put to better use on the pitch.

John Walsh: Hughes's inner turmoil laid bare

Ted Hughes's poem "Last Letter", newly discovered in the British Library, is a shattering piece of work. Not because it's the first piece of writing in which he addressed the circumstances of Sylvia Plath's suicide. Not because it tracks through the last three days of her unhappy life on earth. Not even because it's a great poem, although it has moments of Parnassian brilliance. What makes it an emotionally draining experience is the tension it embodies, between what the angry, distraught, bewildered husband Ted Hughes wants to say about his wife's final hours, and what the cool, judicious, focused poet Ted Hughes will allow himself to say about them for posterity. Wordsworth said poetry was "emotion recollected in tranquillity". I don't believe I've ever read a poem in which emotion was so obviously recollected in anguish and turmoil, barely contained by the formal requirements of line, sense and rhythm.

Market Report: Shanks spikes on talk of resurrected Carlyle bid

The rumour mill rumbled on last night, with Shanks rallying by as much as 12 per cent on talk of renewed bid interest from the Carlyle Group.

Mark Steel: That's right, it was all a Muslim plot

You might think that a plot to blow up the Pope would be news for a while. Popes don't get blown up all that often, and this one's enough of a celebrity that if he fell over drunk at the MTV awards with Kanye West it would be in the papers for a few days, so it's strange that a plot to blow him up was only of interest for one day.

Landfill: A hole lot of trouble

Burying rubbish doesn't sound like the best solution to Britain's waste problems – but for decades landfill was regarded as the future. How wrong we were, says Kate Burt

James Moore: Bags are a problem, whatever the BRC says

Outlook The British Retail Consortium was hoping to bag itself and its members a pat on the back yesterday by releasing figures showing that the number of plastic carriers handed out has fallen by 4.6 billion since 2006. "A tremendous achievement," the BRC gushed. "A ringing endorsement of the voluntary approach."

Supermarkets lose heart in green war on plastic carrier bags

Campaigners call for legislation as retailers fail to meet targets to cut one of the most visible signs of waste. Susie Mesure reports

Leading article: Plastic death on the seas

The discovery of another huge concentration of rubbish, this one in the Atlantic and comparable in size to the now notorious "Great Pacific Garbage Patch", is a stark reminder of how, despite the warnings of ecologists that have been ringing in our ears for decades, we continue to throw away more and more plastic, regardless of the consequences.

Sucking Eggs, By Patricia Nicol

At a time when recycling, allotments and "austerity chic" are in vogue, Nicol had the bright idea of looking back at a time when digging for victory and making do and mending were vital for the survival of the nation.

UK may have to import rubbish for incinerators

Waste Britain: Improved recycling rates mean that we may not have enough garbage to feed planned new plants

James Lawton: Why Morgan's reprieve has swept arguments against technology into the dustbin

Still, some wonder why from time to time quite a number of us are so outraged by the neglect of technological assistance for match officials.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us