Arts and Entertainment

Mohammed Ali  used to boast that when boxing,  he would float like a butterfly and sting like a bee. So it is with Germiane Greer. She writes lightly, gracefully even when agitating for a cause. But the words still sting. And unsettle. Here she consciously creates a quasi-religious epic out of a part of her remarkable life when she decided to restore a small, wrecked rainforest in Australia, her homeland. The tone is apocalyptic, themes existential and critical: (wo)man not against, but ardently for wondrous, pitiless and predatory nature. She, the Lionheart, is awed, meets devastation, fears cataclysms, intuits prophecies, bears historical and biological guilt,  seeks redemption and takes stupendous, fervent  action. It really is some story.

Is Breaking Bad's Ozymandias the greatest episode of TV ever written?

Spoiler alert: If you haven't watched episode 14 of Breaking Bad season five, look away now

Picture of the day: What’s not to hike - 360,000 trekkers make their way up the top of Snowdon

Unusually large numbers of hill walkers on Saturday make their way to the summit of Snowdon, catching the last of the summer weather.

Colorado floods: Residents warned to evacuate or face weeks without power, running water or basic supplies

At least four people have died and hundreds remain unaccounted for, with more rain forecast for the coming days

Invisible Ink: No 190 - Arthur Upfield

Golden Age crime-writing was not the exclusive province of the British and the Americans. Arthur Upfield is an interesting case, because something very disturbing happened to him. Upfield was born in 1890 in Hampshire, but in 1910, after he fared poorly in his exams (he was planning to become an estate agent) his father shipped him off to Australia, where he eventually settled – if you can call it settling, for he led an itinerant life.

Open Jaw: Where readers write back

Slice of the city: Algiers

I visited Algiers and found it a very strange place. Horribly expensive hotels and absolutely nothing to do in the evening (though I see from your article that the local authorities are trying to address the situation) and huge numbers of police with guns milling about at seemingly random checkpoints. Not that they were at all threatening to me, but they did seem to be overly worried for my wellbeing. I'd agree the place shows a lot of promise, but it wasn't quite as idyllic as you pointed out. I'll give it five years and then return to see how things have changed.

Paul

'Siberian Mowgli' found after spending 16 years living in the wilderness

Russian authorities have discovered a young man in the Siberian forest who said he had been living in a hut with his parents for the last 16 years, according to local officials.

GTA 5: map leak shows off the biggest Grand Theft Auto game world to date

Fictional game world of Los Santos casts a satirical eye over the excesses of Los Angeles and its surrounding areas.

Book of a lifetime: In the Heart of the Country, by JM Coetzee

A good book must have a certain aroma. That is what a lifetime of reading library books has taught me. Some reek too much of tobacco, others have a musty odour that seems to choke the very text, but the books that chime with me just smell right. I find them by accident; hiding behind frayed plastic jackets in the book sales of the local libraries. I peel away their protective wrapping and then sniff. In the Heart of the Country by JM Coetzee had hints of apple, sandalwood and charcoal between its pages; surprising, for such a lean and austere book, but  also promising.

Opposite: the Blue Mountains National Park

Body found in Australia bushland is 'missing British man Gary Tweddle'

Gary Tweddle has not been seen since he disappeared after a work dinner seven weeks ago

Opposite: the Blue Mountains National Park

Australia: Body found in Blue Mountains hunt for missing Briton Gary Tweddle

The 23-year-old expat went missing on 15 July from his hotel

On song: Jordi Gomez celebrates after claiming the second goal for Wigan

Wigan Athletic 2 Nottingham Forest 1 match report: Billy Davies seething as Forest come up short

The visitors' dressing-room backs onto the press toilets at the DW Stadium. Usual insights are reliably restricted to dubious musical tastes, but at half-time of this match, only the rasping voice of Billy Davies was audible. When put politely, the Nottingham Forest manager was not happy with his team's performance. It was industrial strength stuff. Given what he'd seen, it was also understandable.

Johnathan Croom suicide: Teenage boy obsessed with Into the Wild film found dead after disappearing in Oregon wilderness

The 'super smart' teenager's abandoned car was discovered last Wednesday

Four people rescued from mountainside in China

A group of people in China have been rescued after they were nearly swept away by a fast-flowing river when torrential rain struck.

Saltwater crocodile numbers in Australia have shot up since the species was protected by federal law in 1971

Australian police retrieve body after 26-year-old man killed in crocodile attack

The body of a 26-year-old swimmer who was snatched by a crocodile as he attempted  to cross an Australian river has been recovered by police.

The Big Six: Luxury camps

From safari-style tents and old ghost towns to rice paddies and desert experiences

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Blundering Tony Blair quits as Middle East peace envoy – only Israel will miss him

Blundering Blair quits as Middle East peace envoy – only Israel will miss him

For Arabs – and for Britons who lost their loved ones in his shambolic war in Iraq – his appointment was an insult, says Robert Fisk
Fifa corruption arrests: All hail the Feds for riding to football's rescue

Fifa corruption arrests

All hail the Feds for riding to football's rescue, says Ian Herbert
Isis in Syria: The Kurdish enclave still resisting the tyranny of President Assad and militant fighters

The Kurdish enclave still resisting the tyranny of Assad and Isis

In Syrian Kurdish cantons along the Turkish border, the progressive aims of the 2011 uprising are being enacted despite the war. Patrick Cockburn returns to Amuda
How I survived Cambodia's Killing Fields: Acclaimed surgeon SreyRam Kuy celebrates her mother's determination to escape the US

How I survived Cambodia's Killing Fields

Acclaimed surgeon SreyRam Kuy celebrates her mother's determination to escape to the US
Stephen Mangan interview: From posh buffoon to pregnant dad, the actor has quite a range

How Stephen Mangan got his range

Posh buffoon, hapless writer, pregnant dad - Mangan is certainly a versatile actor
The ZX Spectrum has been crowd-funded back into play - with some 21st-century tweaks

The ZX Spectrum is back

The ZX Spectrum was the original - and for some players, still the best. David Crookes meets the fans who've kept the games' flames lit
Grace of Monaco film panned: even the screenwriter pours scorn on biopic starring Nicole Kidman

Even the screenwriter pours scorn on Grace of Monaco biopic

The critics had a field day after last year's premiere, but the savaging goes on
Menstrual Hygiene Day: The strange ideas people used to believe about periods

Menstrual Hygiene Day: The strange ideas people once had about periods

If one was missed, vomiting blood was seen as a viable alternative
The best work perks: From free travel cards to making dreams come true (really)

The quirks of work perks

From free travel cards to making dreams come true (really)
Is bridge the latest twee pastime to get hip?

Is bridge becoming hip?

The number of young players has trebled in the past year. Gillian Orr discovers if this old game has new tricks
Long author-lists on research papers are threatening the academic work system

The rise of 'hyperauthorship'

Now that academic papers are written by thousands (yes, thousands) of contributors, it's getting hard to tell workers from shirkers
The rise of Lego Clubs: How toys are helping children struggling with social interaction to build better relationships

The rise of Lego Clubs

How toys are helping children struggling with social interaction to build better relationships
5 best running glasses

On your marks: 5 best running glasses

Whether you’re pounding pavements, parks or hill passes, keep your eyes protected in all weathers
Joe Root: 'Ben Stokes gives everything – he’s rubbing off on us all'

'Ben Stokes gives everything – he’s rubbing off on us all'

Joe Root says the England dressing room is a happy place again – and Stokes is the catalyst
Raif Badawi: Wife pleads for fresh EU help as Saudi blogger's health worsens

Please save my husband

As the health of blogger Raif Badawi worsens in prison, his wife urges EU governments to put pressure on the Saudi Arabian royal family to allow her husband to join his family in Canada