Arts and Entertainment

Mohammed Ali  used to boast that when boxing,  he would float like a butterfly and sting like a bee. So it is with Germiane Greer. She writes lightly, gracefully even when agitating for a cause. But the words still sting. And unsettle. Here she consciously creates a quasi-religious epic out of a part of her remarkable life when she decided to restore a small, wrecked rainforest in Australia, her homeland. The tone is apocalyptic, themes existential and critical: (wo)man not against, but ardently for wondrous, pitiless and predatory nature. She, the Lionheart, is awed, meets devastation, fears cataclysms, intuits prophecies, bears historical and biological guilt,  seeks redemption and takes stupendous, fervent  action. It really is some story.

Is Breaking Bad's Ozymandias the greatest episode of TV ever written?

Spoiler alert: If you haven't watched episode 14 of Breaking Bad season five, look away now

Picture of the day: What’s not to hike - 360,000 trekkers make their way up the top of Snowdon

Unusually large numbers of hill walkers on Saturday make their way to the summit of Snowdon, catching the last of the summer weather.

Colorado floods: Residents warned to evacuate or face weeks without power, running water or basic supplies

At least four people have died and hundreds remain unaccounted for, with more rain forecast for the coming days

Invisible Ink: No 190 - Arthur Upfield

Golden Age crime-writing was not the exclusive province of the British and the Americans. Arthur Upfield is an interesting case, because something very disturbing happened to him. Upfield was born in 1890 in Hampshire, but in 1910, after he fared poorly in his exams (he was planning to become an estate agent) his father shipped him off to Australia, where he eventually settled – if you can call it settling, for he led an itinerant life.

Open Jaw: Where readers write back

Slice of the city: Algiers

I visited Algiers and found it a very strange place. Horribly expensive hotels and absolutely nothing to do in the evening (though I see from your article that the local authorities are trying to address the situation) and huge numbers of police with guns milling about at seemingly random checkpoints. Not that they were at all threatening to me, but they did seem to be overly worried for my wellbeing. I'd agree the place shows a lot of promise, but it wasn't quite as idyllic as you pointed out. I'll give it five years and then return to see how things have changed.

Paul

'Siberian Mowgli' found after spending 16 years living in the wilderness

Russian authorities have discovered a young man in the Siberian forest who said he had been living in a hut with his parents for the last 16 years, according to local officials.

GTA 5: map leak shows off the biggest Grand Theft Auto game world to date

Fictional game world of Los Santos casts a satirical eye over the excesses of Los Angeles and its surrounding areas.

Book of a lifetime: In the Heart of the Country, by JM Coetzee

A good book must have a certain aroma. That is what a lifetime of reading library books has taught me. Some reek too much of tobacco, others have a musty odour that seems to choke the very text, but the books that chime with me just smell right. I find them by accident; hiding behind frayed plastic jackets in the book sales of the local libraries. I peel away their protective wrapping and then sniff. In the Heart of the Country by JM Coetzee had hints of apple, sandalwood and charcoal between its pages; surprising, for such a lean and austere book, but  also promising.

Opposite: the Blue Mountains National Park

Body found in Australia bushland is 'missing British man Gary Tweddle'

Gary Tweddle has not been seen since he disappeared after a work dinner seven weeks ago

Opposite: the Blue Mountains National Park

Australia: Body found in Blue Mountains hunt for missing Briton Gary Tweddle

The 23-year-old expat went missing on 15 July from his hotel

On song: Jordi Gomez celebrates after claiming the second goal for Wigan

Wigan Athletic 2 Nottingham Forest 1 match report: Billy Davies seething as Forest come up short

The visitors' dressing-room backs onto the press toilets at the DW Stadium. Usual insights are reliably restricted to dubious musical tastes, but at half-time of this match, only the rasping voice of Billy Davies was audible. When put politely, the Nottingham Forest manager was not happy with his team's performance. It was industrial strength stuff. Given what he'd seen, it was also understandable.

Johnathan Croom suicide: Teenage boy obsessed with Into the Wild film found dead after disappearing in Oregon wilderness

The 'super smart' teenager's abandoned car was discovered last Wednesday

Four people rescued from mountainside in China

A group of people in China have been rescued after they were nearly swept away by a fast-flowing river when torrential rain struck.

Saltwater crocodile numbers in Australia have shot up since the species was protected by federal law in 1971

Australian police retrieve body after 26-year-old man killed in crocodile attack

The body of a 26-year-old swimmer who was snatched by a crocodile as he attempted  to cross an Australian river has been recovered by police.

The Big Six: Luxury camps

From safari-style tents and old ghost towns to rice paddies and desert experiences

Sport
File photo of Lewis Hamilton celebrating becoming World Champion after victory in the 2014 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix as he was made favourite to become the first motor racing winner of Sports Personality of the Year since Damon Hill
sportGareth Bale, Carl Froch and Kelly Gallagher also in the mix for award
News
Japan's Suntory Beverage & Food has bought GlaxoSmithKline's Lucozade and Ribena
news
News
A tongue-eating louse (not the one Mr Poli found)
newsParasitic louse appeared inside unfilleted sea bass
News
The illusionist believes hypnotism helped him to deal with the lack of control he felt growing up
people'It’s not that people react badly to it – they really don't care'
News
peopleJack Monroe accuses David Cameron of 'misty-eyed rhetoric'
News
Tana Ramsay gave evidence in a legal action in which her husband, Gordon, is accusing her father, Christopher Hutcheson, of using a ghost writer machine to “forge” his signature
peopleTana Ramsay said alleged discovery was 'extremely distressing'
Arts and Entertainment
Robin Windsor and Aljaz Skorjanec rehearse their same-sex dance together on Strictly Come Dancing
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Prices correct as of 21 November 2014
In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible