News Sunbathers in St James Park, London, as much of Britain is bathed in sunshine

Heavy downpours might have blighted the start of the Bank Holiday weekend for some, but tomorrow the whole country will once again be bathed in sunshine.

Football: Van Hooijdonk lifts Forest

Nottingham Forest 3 Huddersfield Town 0

Golf: Faldo's fight against the clock

European Tour steps up the war against slow play as Els watches his lead slip away

Rugby Union: Exiles' exposure

Blackheath 34

What, when, where ...

Feeling peckish after Christmas? Go wild at the Great British Pudding Festival, held at the Three Ways House Hotel in Mickleton. Those who take their puddings really seriously can stay in the Spotted Dick and Custard bedroom (booking essential) and feast themselves at the Pudding Parade of seven puddings, including one mysteriously known as "Lord Randall".

The Investment Column: Portmeirion's small servings

Portmeirion Potteries, the up-market table and ovenware business, yesterday served up another set of disappointing figures. Neither summer windfalls nor winter sales seem to have brought any joy to the group and it was forced to issue its second profit warning in the last six months. This caused the shares to crash another 52.5p to 240p yesterday, chipping another pounds 5m off its market capitalisation. It is now valued at just under pounds 25m, less than half its worth last summer.

Slug & Lettuce entrepreneur plans float for his latest pub venture

Hugh "Sooty" Corbett has become a legend in the pub business by building up the Slug & Lettuce and Harvey Floorbangers chains and selling them off for a handsome profit to larger drinks groups. Andrew Yates discovers he is at it again with grand plans to make his new Tup Inns a household name.

Tried & tested: Up to scratch

Too soft, too hard, too thick, too thin, too bright, too dull, too flaky, too ... Nail varnish: our panel chips in

Gardening: Trench warfare in the heart of Essex

workshop

Business Outlook: The strange case of the offside minister

This is New Labour and we are living in the age of shareholder democracy so perhaps nobody should be too surprised that the odd minister or two has a few shares salted away. The Government has, after all, embraced private ownership with a gusto that would have been unthinkable even five years ago.

In my week

The rhododendrons drip in that familiar way that will be always associated in my mind with childhood holidays. Scots, on the whole, go on holiday in Scotland, and exiled Scots go on holiday in Scotland, too. While the rest of Britain whines about the heat, the north east of Scotland is cloaked in a haar, and conversation revolves around whether a wind will come and blow it away. This is of particular interest at the moment because the grouse season started on Tuesday and German businessmen don't like it when nature conspires to blur their sights.

Stock market week: Chisholm going for a high as he plays his last number for BSkyB

The results season starts to run into its summer barren season next week with only a handful of blue chip companies reporting.

Death in the forest

In the Appalachian mountains, a mystery unfolds. There is no concrete evidence of pollution, yet the trees are dying. Can they yet be saved? asks Caspar Henderson

Polo's patrons in mint condition

The sport that costs a fortune also allows its tycoon backers to ride with the stars. Greg Wood mingles with the cool and the corpulent at Cowdray Park

Licked by the Postage Stamp

When Willie Park, the first winner of the Open Championship, took a look at Royal Troon's eighth hole he was aghast. It has "a pitching surface," he said, "skimmed down to the size of a postage stamp". The name stuck, although it is unlikely whether Mark Calcavecchia delivered his abuse yesterday in such charming and eloquent terms.

If the smell from next door's patio is driving you wild...

...it's time for a bit of DIY in the garden. Richard Phillips on the stress-free way to build your own barbecue
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones