Travel Me casa, su casa: the breakfast room

A creative, globe-trotting couple have put their stamp on a pair of 1920s buildings in Barrio Italia. By Sorrel Moseley-Williams

SWEEPING THE BOARDS

Fancy yourself as something of a main player? Whether you relish the capitalist cut and thrust of Monopoly, tiddling winks or concentrating on a nice cerebral game of chess, Pass Go is the exhibition for you. Opening this week at Leicester City Art Gallery, it's a show that plays mind games with your attitudes to contemporary art and board games, while tapping into the rich seam of twenty- and thirtysomething nostalgia

Letter: Free for a day

Sir: Eleanor Boyle (Letters, 30 June) will be pleased to know that we at Dulwich Picture Gallery operate exactly the Continental free day system, which she advocates. Normally the Gallery costs pounds 3 or pounds 1.50 concession, with free admission for children and the unemployed; on Friday it is free for all. England's oldest public art gallery receives no revenue funding from the state.

Artist robbed of his prize work

Daryl Georgiou must have thought his eyes were playing tricks on him when he discovered his prized work had been stolen from a West End art gallery just 20 minutes after being informed that he had scooped a prestigious award.

EYE OPENER: EYE CATCHING

It seems appropriate that the international festival `A Quality of Light' should take place in West Cornwall; the luminous intensity of the area has attracted artists for more than a century. Work from the USA, Argentina, Croatia, the Philippines and the UK uses the theme of light in various media, including painting, sculpture, installations and new technology. Among the artists taking part are Roger Ackling, Mona Hatoum, Martina Kramer, Paul Ramirez Jonas and Glen Onwin (whose `Blood of the Pelican' at the Geevor Mine) is shown above.

Not so much a crisis... ... more a new opportunity?

Hester Lacey hears other midlife views

Touchy subjects

What can a fluffy bike and rubber Hoover tell us about everyday life? asks Hester Lacey

Review

Pirouetting on gold platform stilettoes, weightless in blood-red brocade, tossing her spectacular blonde locks and laughing like a drain, she looked every inch the Cleopatra of London bohemia. She was Jibby Beane, "the Art Scene Queen", subject of last night's Women at Play (C4), and, in her fifties, a living remonstration to chintzy maturity everywhere. There have always been such rebels, of course. Even Virginia Woolf was not just, as you may have been led to believe by reading her novels, the doyenne of Dullsville - she was also the woman who wrote: "The older one grows, the more one likes indecency." Ms Beane's explanation of her sudden transformation from suburban wife to metropolitan hedonist ran thus: "You only have one life, there's no rehearsal." One of the benefits of getting older, presumably, is the realisation that cliches such as that one enable you to buy into a stock of incontrovertible truth without appearing sententious. Jibby reeled the line off with a knowing airiness, but she sure went on to give it value for money.

Letter: Lever's true model village

Sir: What tripe Jonathan Glancey writes (Architecture, 20 August) about Port Sunlight and Billy Lever's role in its building.

Tate trustee admits security flaws

Public institutions such as art galleries find it virtually impossible to safeguard themselves against "cunning and determined" art criminals, a senior figure at the Tate Gallery admitted yesterday.

LETTER: Angelic comment

Sir: If Kathy King supposes (11 October) that no one wants the Gateshead Angel, she ought to visit the exhibition in the Shipley Art Gallery, where comment in the visitors' book is predominantly favourable.

OBITUARY:Margaret Read

Your sympathetic obituary of Margaret Read by Leonie Cohn [21 March] put me in mind of my first day as a young assistant at York Art Gallery in the austere days of January 1953, writes John Jacob.

A Millennium miss

THE visionaries and dreamers devising landmark buildings and other expensive projects to celebrate the Millennium don't actually need to bother about the year 2000, the Millennium Commission has ruled, writes Catherine Pepinster.

LETTER : Gnat-picking

From Dr Ed Jarzembowski

LETTER:Why art galleries deserve respect

From Mr Peter Osborne

RIGHT OF REPLY : Go west, silly man

Cold and exclusive? Pshaw! Angela Flowers defends the commercial gallery
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
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