Nightwatching (18)

Peter Greenaway offers a masterclass in the intrigue behind Rembrandt's enigmatic painting of Amsterdam militia, The Night Watch, which he believes explains the drastic ignominy that befell the painter himself.

Album: Blasco de Nebra, Piano Sonatas / Javier Perianes (Harmonia Mundi)

An enigmatic fusion of baroque and classical styles, the music of Manuel Blasco de Nebra languished in manuscript for 180 years after the composer's death.

Album: Anne Sofie von Otter, Ombre De Mon Amant (Deutsche Grammophon)

Performed with period ensemble Les Arts Florissants, Ombre De Mon Amant reflects mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter's affection for the airs of the French Baroque.

Album: Florilegium etc, Bolivian Baroque 3, (Channel Classics)

Florilegium's third disc of music from the Bolivian missions opens with a carol. "Fuera, Fuera!" is a dialogue between local Indians and Spanish shepherds in which both groups hurry to Bethlehem, laughing at each other.

Adrian Hamilton: Sing Hallelujah for our Handel

He understood that the British are uniquely in love with performance

Album: Caccini, D'India, Monteverdi etc, La Voce di Orfeo (Naïve)

Sung by Furio Zanasi and played by the viol, harp and lute trio La Chimera, this recital is both a portrait of the poet, composer and singer Francesco Rasi (1574-1621) and a study of the different "amatory conditions" of Baroque song.

Rembrandt masterpiece 'could fetch £25m'

When it last went under the hammer in 1930 it fetched the princely sum of £18,500. Yesterday auctioneers expressed confidence that a Rembrandt masterpiece, unseen in public for more than 40 years, will fetch up to £25m, this time around.

Album: Monsters of Folk, Monsters of Folk (Rough Trade)

Obvious differences of scale prevent this alliance of American indie luminaries

Baroque and roll: The opulent style of French kings is making a comeback

Baroque is having a moment. It seems that the style that dominated Europe throughout much of the 17th and 18th centuries with its dazzling expressions of wealth and opulence could turn out to be a surprising but perfect antidote to our gloomy, penny-pinching times.

Album: Law, Burgess, Sirkis Congregation, (33 Jazz)

Reminiscent of Don Pullen's Ode to Life, or a Keith Jarrett ballad without the grunting, "Chorale", the final, astounding track on this second album by pianist John Law's co-op trio, is a work of real grace and beauty.

Album: Boëly, Musique de Chambre – Quatuor Mosaïques, (Laborie)

Half-fossil, half-innovator, organist and composer Alexandre Pierre François Boëly (1785-1858) was the self-appointed guardian of the classical style.

Rembrandt: a portrait of the artist as a young lad

US scholar identifies rare depiction of the Old Master as a 16-year-old

Is Baroque recession-proof?

On the eve of a new V&A exhibition, Annie Deakin finds herself stuck between Baroque and a hard place

Last Night's Television: Orangutan Diary, BBC2<br />Baroque! From St Peter's To St Paul's, BBC4

The titles for Orangutan Diary freeze on an image that is a perfect emblem of its seductive appeal: a small hairy hand clutching dependently at a human arm. That, at one level, is what primates mean to us, however big and muscular they become. We see them, thanks to a broad misreading of Darwin, as ourselves in infancy, and when they're brought into conjunction with human clothing or human objects, our familial (and faintly condescending fondness) is amplified. When the primates are actually infants, even the sternest rationalists are likely to find themselves melting into a puddle of anthropomorphic sentiment. Orangutan Diary contains images of such concentrated cuteness that they should probably read out one of those warning statements at the beginning, alerting particularly susceptible viewers that it contains "extreme scenes of winsomeness from the beginning". When they wheeled on a wheelbarrow full of baby orang-utans in disposable nappies, you could probably hear the audience reaction coming through the window, a strange collective moo of delight.

Haydn The Creation Freiburg Baroque Orchestra, Barbican Hall, London

Haydn said – let there be enlightenment. And there was. The Creation is a loveable and audacious work and part of the problem with this well-drilled performance was that loveability was achieved at the expense of the audacity. Haydn's wondrous series of special effects failed to amuse or startle, while the succession of recitatives, arias, and choruses came and went offering pleasure but rarely astonishment.

Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Turkey-Kurdish conflict: Obama's deal with Ankara is a betrayal of Syrian Kurds and may not even weaken Isis

US betrayal of old ally brings limited reward

Since the accord, the Turks have only waged war on Kurds while no US bomber has used Incirlik airbase, says Patrick Cockburn
VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but doubts linger over security

'A gift from Egypt to the rest of the world'

VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but is it really needed?
Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, applauds a man who clearly has more important things on his mind
The male menopause and intimations of mortality

Aches, pains and an inkling of mortality

So the male menopause is real, they say, but what would the Victorians, 'old' at 30, think of that, asks DJ Taylor
Man Booker Prize 2015: Anna Smaill - How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?

'How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?'

Man Booker Prize nominee Anna Smaill on the rise of Kiwi lit
Bettany Hughes interview: The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems

Bettany Hughes interview

The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems
Art of the state: Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China

Art of the state

Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China
Mildreds and Vanilla Black have given vegetarian food a makeover in new cookbooks

Vegetarian food gets a makeover

Long-time vegetarian Holly Williams tries to recreate some of the inventive recipes in Mildreds and Vanilla Black's new cookbooks
The haunting of Shirley Jackson: Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?

The haunting of Shirley Jackson

Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?
Bill Granger recipes: Heading off on holiday? Try out our chef's seaside-inspired dishes...

Bill Granger's seaside-inspired recipes

These dishes are so easy to make, our chef is almost embarrassed to call them recipes
Ashes 2015: Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

A woefully out-of-form Michael Clarke embodies his team's fragile Ashes campaign, says Michael Calvin
Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza

Andrew Grice: Inside Westminster

Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza
HMS Victory: The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

Exclusive: David Keys reveals the research that finally explains why HMS Victory went down with the loss of 1,100 lives
Survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bomb attack: Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism

'I saw people so injured you couldn't tell if they were dead or alive'

Nagasaki survivors on why Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism
Jon Stewart: The voice of Democrats who felt Obama had failed to deliver on his 'Yes We Can' slogan, and the voter he tried hardest to keep onside

The voter Obama tried hardest to keep onside

Outgoing The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart, became the voice of Democrats who felt the President had failed to deliver on his ‘Yes We Can’ slogan. Tim Walker charts the ups and downs of their 10-year relationship on screen