Arts and Entertainment

Shepherds Bush Empire, London

Play it again, Glam

Facial glitter, platform soles, velvet flares - and Aladdin Sane appearing at the Phoenix Festival? Yes, Glam Rock is back, says Michael Collins

People in fashion: A knack for all trades

Fashion isn't just about clothes. Hester Lacey meets multi-talented design duo New RenaisCAnce

Mr Reeves' big afternoon out; Interview: Vic Reeves

He won't talk to the Press pack about his love-life, but he doesn't mind a nice one-to-one

the year I got lost in music

THE suzi feay COLUMN

Why me?

The clothes line

'I'd envisaged Bryan Ferry slaving over a sewing-machine to all hours'

DICKIE FANTASTIC ON THE SCHMOOZE

Stuck for costume ideas? Try tape

Star Trek meets Blue Peter in Bunty Matthias's show, says Tamsin Blanch ard

POP / Why pay the ferry man?: The epitome of detached irony, Bryan Ferry is back on the road. Phil Johnson saw him in Brimingham

With his centre-parted hair still showing far more black than grey (though even in the old days there was always a suggestion of boot polish), and his leather trousers fitting better than any man of 49 could reasonably expect, Bryan Ferry looks in better shape than his audience.

RECORDS / New release

Robbie Robertson and the Red Road Ensemble: Music For The Native Americans (Capitol, CD/ tape). The ex-Band leader's third solo album is not very solo at all. He writes and plays on some of the songs on this documentary soundtrack, but his main role is to co-ordinate the Native Americans who give a taste of their traditional music (Robertson himself is of Mohawk descent). The result is rich and diverse, alien yet accessible. 'Ancestor Song' echoes the chanting that is familiar from Westerns, while, to my uncultured ears, the tinkling 'Mahk Jchi' sounds Oriental. 'Akua Tuta' melds Robertson's dusty adult-oriented rock with Innu vocals, and the chorus of 'The Golden Feather' is addictively sweet. A unique record which deserves to sell more copies than it will. Nicholas Barber THE IoS PLAYLIST Brahms, Piano Concerto No 2. Kovacevich/LPO/Sawallisch (EMI, CD). A worthy follow-up to last year's award-winning No 1, with the conviction and strength of mature artists who know what they and this music are about.

RECORDS / New Releases

Dave Stewart: Message from the Gutter (East-West, CD/tape). Breaking the strange convention that is currently leading many otherwise sensible people (Boz Scaggs, Aimee Mann, Bryan Ferry) to open their CDs with the worst track, the former Eurythmic launches his first solo album with a perfect pop song. 'Heart of Stone' sounds like a meeting between Bowie's 'Modern Love' and Odyssey's 'Native New Yorker', and it goes on to make the most of that duality: buried beneath its many hooks, beneath a wispy veil of strings and the funky stabs of a Hammond organ, lies a coded meditation on the eternal conflict between uptown and downtown, between microchips and valves, between science and nature. The rest of the album can't live up to that level of dialectical intensity, but the craftsmanship is unfailingly good and the rhythm section, with former P-Funkateers Bernie Worrell on keyboards and Bootsy Collins on bass, is always up to something behind Stewart's Bowiesque singing. All rather more satisfying, in fact, than you might expect from someone who spends time with Damien Hirst. Richard Williams

RECORDS / The IoS Playlist: The five best sounds of the moment

Lutoslawski: Symphonies 3 & 4. Los Angeles Philharmonic / Salonen (Sony, CD only). Confirmation that Lutoslawski is an alluring symphonist, Los Angeles a world-class orchestra, and Salonen one of the finest younger MDs in the business. Michael White

Fashion Update: Princely disdain

INCREDIBLE. There are some people in the world for whom a Versace fashion show is not quite the heavenly fashion moment it's cooked up to be.

Interview: Price of perfection: Antony Price once dressed Bryan Ferry and the Rolling Stones. Now he reshapes women in frocks that are quite simply gripping

Antony Price likes birds, preferably rare and exotic ones. His studio in Kennington, south London, resounds to their high-pitched shrieks and swooping cries. On the first floor he works at his drawing board, flanked by papier-mache torsos and fabric samples, overlooking a central showroom with aviaries at each end. Inside the cages brilliantly coloured birds flicker to and fro, while at ground level two hulking cats prowl and lash their tails with desire and frustration. It would be an oversimplification to liken the birds to his glamorous clients and the cats to predatory males, but the image undeniably springs to mind.

BOOK REVIEW / Leap back into make-believe: William Scammell examines four poets' treatment of love, family and contemporary life

THE Bryan Ferry of English poetry, smoother than the lapels on a Hollywood tux? Thom Gunn meets Emily Dickinson? Noel Coward with a dash of Elvis? Hugo Williams is all and none of these, as elusive as the scent wafting around the actress mother who figured in his last book, Writing Home, and who looms large once more in Dock Leaves (Faber pounds 6.99).

Glossary: Don't blame him, he's just a poor sex addict

WHEN Valerie Harkess was faced with her toughest question (why did you go back and sleep with Alan Clark even after it had become clear that he was well on the way to completing the Happy Families set?) she opted for the 20th-century equivalent of seeking sanctuary in a holy place. 'I suppose I was addicted to him,' she said. In other words - I need help, not condemnation. I have taken the vows of victimhood. You cannot touch me here.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
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Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

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Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

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How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

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We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
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Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

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Acting in video games gets a makeover

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