Sport Jose-Maria Olazabal, Javier Ballesteros and Miguel Angel Jimenez pose for a picture before teeing-off at the Dubai Desert Classic

Ballesteros was playing as an amateur at the event that his late and beloved father won back in 1992

Gardening: Bulbs to light up the winter garden: Spring flowers should be planted informally, here densely, there sparsely, to achieve a natural look, says Stephen Anderton

One of the greatest pleasures of January and February is watching the snowdrops come through and deciding where to plant more of them. It is a lean time for flowers, and it is a rare garden indeed that cannot take more snowdrops, either as an underplanting in formal borders or 'naturalised' in grass or under trees. But naturalised is too easy a word.

Food & Drink: Tasty, mon petit chou]

It is unremarkable that restaurants should be snobbish. They are, after all, a contrast to home; they have, even in these hectic days, a certain formality; they distance us from the actual dirty business of cooking; they employ chefs whose business is to surprise us.

Exhibitions: Pots of passion: When Fred Aylward is not serving Vic Reeves, he likes nothing better than a sexy pot of tea. Iain Gale's mind boggles

Sex is funny. Think about it; then try to explain it to a child and watch the smile: 'Well . . . this bit goes into that bit and then, well . . . that happens.' What? You're joking. It's hilarious. All those funny shapes. It's no wonder we cover them up. We'd be laughing all the time. But there's no getting away from them. They're all around us - in disguise. Even on the breakfast table. 'There's sex in a teapot. It's the spout', says Les. You remember Les. The bald guy from Vic Reeves's show. White coat? Spirit level? At the moment though, in his alter ego of Fred Aylward, Les is explaining why he's chosen to immortalise our naughty bits in a couple of dozen clay pots.

Flat Earth: Greens gauge

ONE sure sign that China is changing could be found on the pavements of Peking last week. Piles and piles of cabbages, the traditional winter staple during the country's socialist transformation - or brutal decline, many Chinese would argue - were gathering frost and few buyers. On average, a Peking family used to buy at least 100 kilos of cabbage to see them through to spring. Day in, day out during the bitter winters of northern China, there was cabbage and nothing but cabbage in everyone's rice bowl. Pickled, boiled, fried, raw - that was it.

Flat Earth: Soaring sauerkraut

IN Europe, by contrast, there has been a cabbage crisis. Poland - the continent's biggest producer, exporter and consumer - had a drought last year that sent the price of sauerkraut soaring. Those who buy from a deli will have noticed the difference: Britain's retailers were forced to pay pounds 13 for a 12-jar carton of Polish sauerkraut, against the usual rate of pounds 7.50. Now this year's harvest has been processed, the price is a more reasonable pounds 8.25.

BOOK REVIEW / In the school of hard knocks: Stand Before Your God: Growing Up to Be a Writer by Paul Watkins: Faber, pounds 14.99

THIS IS the chronicle of an American boy who used a Boeing 747 to get to school; of how, from their home in Rhode Island, Paul Watkins's parents posted him across the Atlantic to an old-fashioned English preparatory school, followed by Eton: 10 years in a couple of hundred pages. You expect a sad catalogue of bewilderment and pain, rounded off with a backward curse. What you get is something a good deal more informative.

Gardening: Chinese veg: now we're spoilt for choys: Delicious, crisp beansprouts and oriental brassicas can be grown at home. Anna Pavord meets a man who has learnt about them the hard way

FOOD fashions of the latter half of the 20th century have changed faster than you can mix a marinade. I rattled my first pans during the Robert Carrier revolution, when every recipe needed either a pint of wine or cream, or both. The next counter-coup brought the bean sprout to power.

Read any good books lately? Look no further for the best

AS MOST of you will soon be on your hols, I bring you a list of the latest summer books, all suitable for taking away and leaving behind on the plane or beach . . .

Food and Drink: How the East gets the most from the least: Keith Botsford in China

ONE OF the most noticeable aspects of Chinese cooking is its sense of economy: economy with ingredients (by using 'all but the feathers'), cooking time (and therefore fuel) and flavour (by reinforcing the natural flavour of the ingredients). The ideal is to do the minimum cooking required to obtain both flavour and texture. Hence the many techniques involved in achieving ts'ui, which connoisseurs tell me is next to impossible to translate.

GARDENING / At home with the green gardeners: Next weekend, 100 organic enthusiasts will be opening their gardens to visitors. Michael Leapman reports

GARDENING organically, without chemicals, is like giving up smoking or drinking: it seems easy at first, but a lot of people, starting with the best intentions, fail to stay the course.

Farm tries new way of keeping bugs at bay

CABBAGES on a farm near Elgin in the north of Scotland are being covered in fine plastic netting in an imaginative attempt to avoid pesticides. It is part of a pounds 1.5m project to improve organic farming methods.

THEATRE / King of the cabbage patch - That the name Brian Friel is now mentioned in the same breath as Sean O'Casey and J M Synge is thanks, in part, to the efforts of Joe Dowling. Sarah Hemming talks to the director

'HE'S SEEN very much as the journeyman director par excellence,' says one friend of the Irish director Joe Dowling. This week Dowling seems to be running true to form. Though Dublin based, he's taking a short break from rehearsing A Midsummer Night's Dream at Stratford, Ontario, to ease his production of Juno and the Paycock into the West End. (He was last in London with Brian Friel's Faith Healer at the Royal Court.)

Food and Drink: Knock the stuffing into Easter: The Sunday lunch can be special without necessarily being traditional, if you add some unusual contrasting flavours and textures

EASTER Sunday lunch is a different kettle of fish from the rigours of the rule-bound Christmas meal. The cook can make it as fancy or simple as he or she is inclined. The focus for this article was going to be a crown roast of lamb, eminently suitable for an Easter feast. But then an alternative began to develop: stuffings.

Cuttings: Coming up roses

WINTER work has begun at the National Trust's garden at Cliveden in Berkshire to restore the rose garden made by designer Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe for Lord Astor in 1959. Paths are being relaid to reinforce the original abstract pattern and the Trust hopes to incorporate Sir Geoffrey's original notion of a secret garden designed in the shape of a cabbage rose. Cliveden reopens in March.
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
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