Sport Jose-Maria Olazabal, Javier Ballesteros and Miguel Angel Jimenez pose for a picture before teeing-off at the Dubai Desert Classic

Ballesteros was playing as an amateur at the event that his late and beloved father won back in 1992

Ham hock and flageolet bean soup

Serves 4-6

Tom Sutcliffe: Tolerance doesn't mean removing the intolerable

Social Studies: The best defence against the offensive and wrong-headed may be restrained indifference

Last Night's TV: 23 Week Babies: the Price of Life/BBC2<br />Great British Food Revival/BBC2

Here's an unsettling Venn diagram. One circle encloses the set of foetuses that may, within the current law, be terminated. The other circle encloses the set of premature babies that, within current technology, can successfully be kept alive. And in the intersection – somewhere between week 23 and week 24 of a pregnancy – lie those babies that qualify both as abortable and savable – the subject of Adam Wishart's challenging film 23 Week Babies: the Price of Life. Until relatively recently this intersection didn't exist at all, since doctors weren't able to keep such early births alive. And even now the overlap is very small indeed: only nine out every 100 such births survive to leave hospital and of those another six will be moderately or severely disabled. What doctors have been getting better at, it seems, is stretching out the process for those that eventually die. Where it used to happen in a matter of days, they can now be in intensive care for weeks before the end finally comes.

Pickled red cabbage

Serves 6

Eve's temptation: Skye Gyngell's celebratory New Year meal

For some reason I am always ridiculously tired at the end of a year – and psychologically I have a renewed sense of energy and excitement at the beginning of the new one. I don't really know why that should be the case, because it is really only one day that melts into another – yet I feel it is a cause to celebrate.

Business Diary: Willis tries hard to outshine cabbage

Who would you rather use as the face of your advertising campaign: Bruce Willis or a cabbage? Well, Russia's National Bank Trust initially wanted the cabbage (which is Russian slang for money), the Moscow Times reports, only for a rival to claim that it has already registered the vegetable as a trademark. At that stage, National Bank Trust opted for a change of direction, hiring Willis instead, who began appearing on billboards around the country on Monday. "Bruce Willis is power," Dmitry Chukseyev, the bank's communications vice president, told the Russian newspaper. "He works much better than cabbage."

Cottage industry: Christina Strutt&rsquo;s vintage look

Christina Strutt was hand-printing pretty fabrics before the floral flood &ndash; and her passion can be seen throughout the 600-year-old home where it all started

Jigsaw hires former Thomas Pink boss as chief executive

The fashion retailer Jigsaw has hired Des Swan, the former managing director of the shirt specialist Thomas Pink, as its new chief executive.

Smoky bacon soup

Serves 6-8

Shortage of cabbage leaves Koreans in a fine pickle

Vegetables pickled in garlic, red chilli and fish paste may not be everyone's plat du jour, but kimchi is Korea's revered national dish, as ubiquitous as fish and chips in Britain.

Leading article: In a pickle

South Korea is in the grip of a Kimchi crisis. A bad cabbage harvest has driven up the price of the ubiquitous, spicy, pickled vegetable dish. And some restaurants are now considering the drastic step of charging customers for their previously gratis Kimchi side salads.

The V&A's 26 Treasures is an object lesson in verse

Of the many events taking place during this year's London Design Festival, one of the more unusual is 26 Treasures at the Victoria & Albert museum. From tomorrow until next Sunday, if you venture into the British Galleries, you will be greeted with a slightly more poetic display than you might expect. Twenty-six writers – including poets Andrew Motion and Maura Dooley – have been paired with an object from the gallery, writing and responding to it in 62 words.

An Island in Time, By Geert Mak

When Amsterdam-based writer Geert Mak first returned to Jorwert, the small Frisian village where he grew up, he came across a photograph of a farmer's yard taken in in 1931.

Dom Joly: Spot-fixing had the cricket world stumped but not me and my scanner

Weird World of Sport: 'Listen, we need to come to an agreement about what might be occurring in your big game...'

Reheated Cabbage, By Irvine Welsh

Irvine Welsh's latest collection of eight stories features very few likeable characters. Almost to a man (and the main characters do tend to be men), they are selfish, greedy, hedonistic, aggressive, violent, misogynistic, self-pitying, and trapped within a blaming perspective. "A Fault on the Line", in which a woman suffers a truly horrific injury as a direct result of her husband's urgent need to get home and watch the football, begins: "As far as it went wi me it wis her own fuckin fault." "Elspeth's Boyfriend", meanwhile, is narrated by the psychopathic Begbie, who headbutts the eponymous boyfriend in return for saving his life.

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