Sport Jose-Maria Olazabal, Javier Ballesteros and Miguel Angel Jimenez pose for a picture before teeing-off at the Dubai Desert Classic

Ballesteros was playing as an amateur at the event that his late and beloved father won back in 1992

I lost my virginity in... Crete: Charles de Ledesma

Late summer 1977 had been chaotic. After A-levels, most of my friends had holed-up in a squat in St John's Wood, London, experimenting with various drugs and sleeping on flea-ridden mattresses copped from the street. The only way to get Nicky out of this vice-ridden, public- schoolboy environment was to offer her a trip olive-picking on the Greek island of Crete - hitch-hiking there and back, of course. Once alone among the Hellenic sights and smells, romance would naturally bloom, or so I imagined.

EDINBURGH REVIEWS: THEATRE The House of Pootsie Plunket St Bride's

EDINBURGH REVIEWS: THEATRE

The Sunday Poem: Badly-Chosen Lover

Every week Ruth Padel discusses a contemporary poet through an example of their work. No 36 Rosemary Tonks

Garden: Simply take two cabbages...

...stick them in a galvanised aluminium bucket and - hey presto! - you have a truly modern flower arrangement. Well, not quite. But achieving cutting-edge effects with your garden flowers is, in fact, nearly as simple

The Week in Radio: From cabbages to King Henry's head

`I CAN never get it in Tavistock,' said the first caller, Caroline, who lives in the Netherlands but seems to shop, despite the sheer inconvenience of the arrangement, in Devon. She was talking chicory as this was Veg Talk (BBC Radio 4, Fridays 3pm), `a Friday afternoon celebration of British seasonal produce.' With a phone-in.

Gardening: Natural justice

When your carefully nurtured seedlings start being devoured by pests, it's tempting to use chemical insecticides. Don't do it, says Sarah Raven - organic methods can be just as effective and your garden will be healthier in the long run but your garden will be healthier in the long run

TRAVEL: COMPETITION

This excerpt has been taken from a work of travel literature. Readers are invited to tell us: a) where is the action taking place? b) who is the author? Blackwell's Bookshops will award pounds 30-worth of book tokens to the first correct answer out of the hat. Answers on a postcard to: Literally Lost, Independent on Sunday, 1 Canada Square, London E14 5DL. Usual competition rules apply. Entries to arrive by this Thursday. Literally Lost 75: The book was 'Voyage of the Beagle' by Charles Darwin. The action took place in New Zealand. The winner is John McKinley from Hounslow.

Real People: That raw feeling

Uncooked food - it's the latest Californian fad. SAM TAYLOR served it up, but were her guests impressed?

Letter: Costly cabbages

Sir: Driving down the M4 recently, I spotted a large sign in a field which proclaimed the support of a major supermarket for Britain's beleaguered farming industry. The same supermarket also professes to champion the cause of the British consumer.

Cabbage smells to infuse Dome

THE PUNGENT aroma of boiled cabbage, redolent of schooldays, will permeate the Millennium Dome's Learn Zone.

The Weasel: After the chiaroscuro smog of Monet's London, I am confronted with cabbages and bog brushes at the Photographers' Gallery

SORRY, YET another piece on Monet, I'm afraid. Last Tuesday, the Royal Academy gave hacks the privilege of viewing its phenomenal trawl in advance of the half-million art-lovers due to flock through its doors. I look forward to reading the considered opinion of Richard Ingrams, whom I saw scooting round the exhibition at approximately 6mph, his shirt-lap flapping furiously. Equally valuable will be the views of his colleague Ian Hislop, who turned up later to spend half an hour or so chortling with a crony.

A rose is still a rose, but everything else in botany is turned on its head

Plants That Now Have New Relatives

People & Business: Boss left holding the baby

YOU KNOW the Christmas shopping frenzy is upon us when chief executives agree to be photographed cuddling Cabbage Patch dolls.

Plants can draw gold from earth

SCIENTISTS HAVE succeeded in mining gold by growing crops that gather the precious metal in their leaves. Experiments have shown that plants, such as chicory, can extract gold from soil treated with a chemical. It allows the plants to dissolve the metal into a form that they can absorb.

Briton's body discovered in Bahamas

THE BODY of a British woman missing on holiday in the Bahamas has been found beside that of another woman. Both appear to have been strangled.
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
Valentine's Day cards: 5 best online card shops

Don't leave it to the petrol station: The best online card shops for Valentine's Day

Can't find a card you like on the high street? Try one of these sites for individual, personalised options, whatever your taste
Diego Costa: Devil in blue who upsets defences is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

The Reds are desperately missing Luis Suarez, says Ian Herbert
Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Former one-day coach says he will ‘observe’ their World Cup games – but ‘won’t be jumping up and down’
Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness