Sport Jose-Maria Olazabal, Javier Ballesteros and Miguel Angel Jimenez pose for a picture before teeing-off at the Dubai Desert Classic

Ballesteros was playing as an amateur at the event that his late and beloved father won back in 1992

I lost my virginity in... Crete: Charles de Ledesma

Late summer 1977 had been chaotic. After A-levels, most of my friends had holed-up in a squat in St John's Wood, London, experimenting with various drugs and sleeping on flea-ridden mattresses copped from the street. The only way to get Nicky out of this vice-ridden, public- schoolboy environment was to offer her a trip olive-picking on the Greek island of Crete - hitch-hiking there and back, of course. Once alone among the Hellenic sights and smells, romance would naturally bloom, or so I imagined.

EDINBURGH REVIEWS: THEATRE The House of Pootsie Plunket St Bride's

EDINBURGH REVIEWS: THEATRE

The Sunday Poem: Badly-Chosen Lover

Every week Ruth Padel discusses a contemporary poet through an example of their work. No 36 Rosemary Tonks

Garden: Simply take two cabbages...

...stick them in a galvanised aluminium bucket and - hey presto! - you have a truly modern flower arrangement. Well, not quite. But achieving cutting-edge effects with your garden flowers is, in fact, nearly as simple

The Week in Radio: From cabbages to King Henry's head

`I CAN never get it in Tavistock,' said the first caller, Caroline, who lives in the Netherlands but seems to shop, despite the sheer inconvenience of the arrangement, in Devon. She was talking chicory as this was Veg Talk (BBC Radio 4, Fridays 3pm), `a Friday afternoon celebration of British seasonal produce.' With a phone-in.

Gardening: Natural justice

When your carefully nurtured seedlings start being devoured by pests, it's tempting to use chemical insecticides. Don't do it, says Sarah Raven - organic methods can be just as effective and your garden will be healthier in the long run but your garden will be healthier in the long run

TRAVEL: COMPETITION

This excerpt has been taken from a work of travel literature. Readers are invited to tell us: a) where is the action taking place? b) who is the author? Blackwell's Bookshops will award pounds 30-worth of book tokens to the first correct answer out of the hat. Answers on a postcard to: Literally Lost, Independent on Sunday, 1 Canada Square, London E14 5DL. Usual competition rules apply. Entries to arrive by this Thursday. Literally Lost 75: The book was 'Voyage of the Beagle' by Charles Darwin. The action took place in New Zealand. The winner is John McKinley from Hounslow.

Real People: That raw feeling

Uncooked food - it's the latest Californian fad. SAM TAYLOR served it up, but were her guests impressed?

Letter: Costly cabbages

Sir: Driving down the M4 recently, I spotted a large sign in a field which proclaimed the support of a major supermarket for Britain's beleaguered farming industry. The same supermarket also professes to champion the cause of the British consumer.

Cabbage smells to infuse Dome

THE PUNGENT aroma of boiled cabbage, redolent of schooldays, will permeate the Millennium Dome's Learn Zone.

The Weasel: After the chiaroscuro smog of Monet's London, I am confronted with cabbages and bog brushes at the Photographers' Gallery

SORRY, YET another piece on Monet, I'm afraid. Last Tuesday, the Royal Academy gave hacks the privilege of viewing its phenomenal trawl in advance of the half-million art-lovers due to flock through its doors. I look forward to reading the considered opinion of Richard Ingrams, whom I saw scooting round the exhibition at approximately 6mph, his shirt-lap flapping furiously. Equally valuable will be the views of his colleague Ian Hislop, who turned up later to spend half an hour or so chortling with a crony.

A rose is still a rose, but everything else in botany is turned on its head

Plants That Now Have New Relatives

People & Business: Boss left holding the baby

YOU KNOW the Christmas shopping frenzy is upon us when chief executives agree to be photographed cuddling Cabbage Patch dolls.

Plants can draw gold from earth

SCIENTISTS HAVE succeeded in mining gold by growing crops that gather the precious metal in their leaves. Experiments have shown that plants, such as chicory, can extract gold from soil treated with a chemical. It allows the plants to dissolve the metal into a form that they can absorb.

Briton's body discovered in Bahamas

THE BODY of a British woman missing on holiday in the Bahamas has been found beside that of another woman. Both appear to have been strangled.
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn