Last Night's TV: 23 Week Babies: the Price of Life/BBC2

Here's an unsettling Venn diagram. One circle encloses the set of foetuses that may, within the current law, be terminated. The other circle encloses the set of premature babies that, within current technology, can successfully be kept alive. And in the intersection – somewhere between week 23 and week 24 of a pregnancy – lie those babies that qualify both as abortable and savable – the subject of Adam Wishart's challenging film 23 Week Babies: the Price of Life. Until relatively recently this intersection didn't exist at all, since doctors weren't able to keep such early births alive. And even now the overlap is very small indeed: only nine out every 100 such births survive to leave hospital and of those another six will be moderately or severely disabled. What doctors have been getting better at, it seems, is stretching out the process for those that eventually die. Where it used to happen in a matter of days, they can now be in intensive care for weeks before the end finally comes.

Eve's temptation: Skye Gyngell's celebratory New Year meal

For some reason I am always ridiculously tired at the end of a year – and psychologically I have a renewed sense of energy and excitement at the beginning of the new one. I don't really know why that should be the case, because it is really only one day that melts into another – yet I feel it is a cause to celebrate.

Jonny Sweet: Let's All Just Have Some Fun, Pleasance Courtyard

Sporting a bow tie and a broad grin, Jonny Sweet, genius of socially awkward comedy and winner of last year's Edinburgh Comedy Award for Best Newcomer, has found another poor unfortunate to bring to life. Imagine a Hugh Grant type with "street Tourette's" ("let's do this shit!") and you'll have some idea of the persona he's created.

36 on the Quay, 47 South Street, Emsworth, Hampshire

There is a charming photograph of 36 on the Quay when it was the Anchor Inn a century ago. It shows a thick-set ruffian with the moustache of a villain in a Chaplin movie. Hands tucked into his waistband, legs apart, he's looking at the camera as though accusing it of spilling his pint. Around him are half a dozen cronies, glaring at the intruding lens. They wouldn't have made the Anchor feel a very welcome place to pop into for a refreshing sherbet.

Cabbages for kings: Mark Hix turns over a brand new leaf

Cabbage gets overlooked a bit at the best of times. I know that we have a reputation for being a nation of meat and two vegetables, but the cabbage family deserves much more prominence on restaurant menus apart from just being boiled and served with a Sunday roast. We grow many varieties of cabbage in the UK, from white cabbage to glossy dark green Italian cavolo nero.

Arias helps off-key Stade sink Bath

Stade Francais 15 Bath 13: Meehan criticises 'cabbage patch' pitch in Paris after seeing injury-hit opponents end his team's European campaign

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Gadget of the week - Spycopter, £165

Remote-controlled helicopters are nothing new and the average park will often house a 'copter geek playing with their toy chopper. But the Spycopter offers something new – not only is it a sturdy, large-scale model, but it also comes fitted with a wireless video camera which transmits a video feed back to a receiver that can be connected to a USB port on a computer to view what the helicopter is seeing. Want to check on your neighbour's prize cabbages? Fancy seeing what your house looks like from the air? This is the flying machine for you.