Sport Jose-Maria Olazabal, Javier Ballesteros and Miguel Angel Jimenez pose for a picture before teeing-off at the Dubai Desert Classic

Ballesteros was playing as an amateur at the event that his late and beloved father won back in 1992

A bit of boiled mutton for Bronze Age man

Scientists are using modern techniques to analyse what our forebears put into their clay cooking pots, writes Sanjida O'Connell

My son `was like a cabbage'

Children/ row over new drug

Brassicas to crow about

The cabbage family are worthy tenants of any kitchen garden, but they can be tricky to grow, particularly with predators about. Anna Pavord has some tips

VISUAL ARTS : A cabbage, a melon, a genius

It's enough to give an art critic indigestion. What more, asks Tom Lubbock, is there to say about the still-life? Other than this...

Roasted rhubarb - the kiwi fruit of '95

Out goes bresaola, here comes smoked kangaroo. Hester Lacey previews th is year's food fads

Cabbage whites are turning pink

BRITAIN'S only pink butterflies are fluttering into the history books just a stone's throw from the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon.

In thing: Harvey Nichols' own brand

Perk up sparse kitchen cupboards with Harvey Nichols' own brand range of food products.

The Pope to say cabbage-patch Mass in Sarajevo

SARAJEVANS of all religious hues (including atheists) are preparing for the arrival on Thursday of the latest celebrity tourist, the Pope. While the Bosnian Serbs surrounding the city mutter dark warnings of a Catholic conspiracy and the United Nations rumbles about the Pontiff's safety, residents are hoping, against the odds, that the Papal visit will somehow bring peace.

EATING OUT / All the dining room's a stage: Midsummer House, Midsummer Common, Cambridge

MIDSUMMER House in Cambridge is not so much a restaurant as foodie performance art. It looks like a terrace house that has been abandoned by its neighbours, and stands at the edge of Midsummer Common beside the river Cam. As we approached the place at dusk, it held the magic of a doll's house: lights twinkling through the windows, and a halo rising above the conservatory to the side.

Gardening: The people that on earth do dwell: Anna Pavord rebels against the organic orthodoxy but can't help being impressed by one passionate crusader in Hampshire

When a visit to the compost bins is the high spot of a garden tour, you know you are in the territory of an organic gardener. The OG may have trouble remembering the name of a particular flower or shrub, but here, in front of the shrines of rotting potato peelings, weeds, grass cuttings and farmyard manure, no question goes unanswered; no detail of the engrossing process of decay and reassimilation is left out.

Scorpion pesticide test goes ahead: Scientists undeterred by fresh evidence about potency of virus

DESPITE safety fears, scientists in full body suits last night sprayed a new bio-pesticide, genetically engineered and strengthened with scorpion venom, on to cabbages in an Oxfordshire field.

Leading Article: Controversy in the cabbage patch

SINCE the release of Jurassic Park, the use of genetic engineering to create new kinds of living things has had a bad name. In fact, this new kind of science is both more mundane and less threatening than the madcap scheme that went so badly wrong in Steven Spielberg's film. One example of its use, in which Britain leads the world, is in pesticides.

Letter: Cowcumbers of 1707

Sir: The real salad days (Letters, 16 March) were c1707, when Henry Wise, who was laying out the kitchen garden at Blenheim, billed the Duke of Marlborough for seeds of: cresses, lop lettuce, cos lettuce, cabbage lettuce, Silesia lettuce, brown Dutch lettuce, corn salad, rocket, succory, hartshorn (swine's cress), Good King Henry, scorzonera, purslane, radish (a peck), black Spanish radish, celery and early cowcumber (sic).

BEST-SELLERS / Top 10 vegetables

----------------------------------------------------------------- TOP 10 VEGETABLES ----------------------------------------------------------------- 1 . .Potato 2 . .Carrot 3 . .Cabbage 4 . .Cauliflower 5 . .Onion 6 . .Pepper 7 . .Courgette 8 . .Aubergine 9 . .French bean 10 . .Beanshoot ----------------------------------------------------------------- Chart supplied by Morning Fresh, Covent Gdn, London WC2 -----------------------------------------------------------------

Gardening: Nothing else is a patch on cabbage: Mr Beeton, for one, considered this vegetable the garden's most important product. Anna Pavord sets out to enhance its image

Cabbages have an image problem. You think of club root and caterpillars, starvation soups and sulphurous smells in hospital corridors. But once you have grown your own, you jettison all that negative baggage. Cabbages start to assume personalities. You begin to appreciate the difference in personality between a sensuously crinkled Savoy and an introverted white Dutch. And you learn that cabbage soup is a delight of the first order, particularly in winter.
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Woman who was sent to three Nazi death camps describes how she escaped the gas chamber

Auschwitz liberation 70th anniversary

Woman sent to three Nazi death camps describes surviving gas chamber
DSK, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel

The inside track on France's trial of the year

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel:
As provocative now as they ever were

Sarah Kane season

Why her plays are as provocative now as when they were written
Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of a killing in Iraq 11 years ago

Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of another killing

Japanese mood was against what was seen as irresponsible trips to a vicious war zone
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea