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Chongjin camp gets 2.8 user rating

Monarchs of all they survey

Francis Spufford looks for the lie of the land; A Mapmaker's Dream: the Meditations of Fra Mauro, cartographer to the court of Venice by James Cowan, Hodder, pounds 12, Maps and History: constructi ng images of the past by Jeremy Black, Yale, pounds 25

GPs to predict suicide risk to patients who lose benefit

Family doctors are being asked to predict whether patients would be likely to commit suicide if their sickness benefit were stopped.

CD-ROM review: Timelapse Leisuresoft, pounds 39.99

Games: think before you shoot

Must-do-better Shell is all at sea

The Investment Column

GPs are back on collision course with ministers over the future of their work

GPs are back on collision course with ministers over the future of their work. By an overwhelming majority, the annual conference of local medical committees - which represents GPs - voted to seek a new "core" contract which would exclude work already undertaken by GPs unless they were paid extra for doing it. They also insisted that GPs must be employed individually and not in groups, should not be employed by NHS Trusts and should continue to operate on a nationally agreed contract.

Letter: Missing men

Sir: If six out of 10 British men are either not registered with a GP, have never registered with a GP or do not know their doctor's name (report, 11 June), GPs must be relieved of 30 per cent of their potential adult workload.

Letter: GPs cannot win

Sir: I know there is little chance of a rational debate on the health service, least of all with an election approaching, but could we please clarify one point? Is the criticism of fund-holding (report, 13 May) that GPs have achieved nothing, or that they have, and thereby created a two-tier system?

GPs reassured

Harriet Harman, the opposition health spokeswoman, will today reassure fundholding GPs in a speech in Nottingham that a Labour government would not immediately take away their control over budgets.

LETTER : Time for GPs to speak out

Dr P A BRADBURY'S letter (12 November) demonstrates clearly the invidiousness of government "business-led" health policy, but isn't it time the BMA exerted its power as it did in Beveridge's reforms and took an ethical stance on this issue?

Investors need a better road map

In the last of a series on pensions, James Patterson questions the service provided by advisers

The worlds that time forgot

Don't dismiss the mappae mundi as guides to lands that never existed. Every imaginary island, every excess of hope or imagination, tells us something about the maps' creators and their societies

Letter: Who will pay for out-of-hours GPs?

Sir: The letter (22 July) from Gerald Malone, Minister for Health, is very good news if the pounds 45m is indeed money for setting up out-of-hours services that would not have been spent on any other NHS provision. However, it does not resolve the problem of the out-of-hours service.

LETTER: GPs cut off by tide of demand

BY A majority of four to one, GPs have voted to reject the Government's package on out-of-hours care. Behind this vote there is a potential crisis facing out-of-hours provision.

LEADING ARTICLE:The positive side of fundholding

Today's Which? survey of GP fundholding neatly illustrates both the Government's and the Opposition's dilemma. GP fundholding has plainly worked, and it has brought problems in its wake.
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Colombia's James Rodriguez celebrates one of his goals during the FIFA World Cup 2014 round of 16 match between Colombia and Uruguay at the Estadio do Maracana in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
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Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn
Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

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20 best days out for the summer holidays

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Rupert Cornwell: A Republican with an eye on the world

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Self-preservation society

Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish
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