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French police have identified the man arrested for shooting a newspaper assistant photographer and carrying out three other attacks.

Giant of British art crafts a monumental new work

Monumental? You asked for monumental? The British sculptor Anish Kapoor yesterday became the fourth artist to meet the challenge of occupying all 13,500sq m of the nave of the Grand Palais in Paris with a single work of art.

The old and new are tangoing together

City Slicker: Buenos Aires - A faster air link has put the Argentine capital in easier reach. Declan McGarvey offers ideas for new and returning visitors

Marks & Spencer gets set to go Dutch

Marks & Spencer is looking to the Netherlands for the next step in its European expansion plan.

Mary Dejevsky: We love a national get-together. Can't we have more of them?

We have nothing - no day, no event, no festival - that comes anywhere near the popular holidays of others, such as Bastille Day or Independence Day

No Regrets, By Carolyn Burke

Much has been written about the singer Edith Piaf, France's "Little Sparrow" who was famed for her impoverished childhood, her doomed love affairs, her illnesses and addictions and her mastery of la chanson réaliste. Along with books (including Piaf's rather selective memoir The Wheel of Fortune) there have been various biopics, most recently Olivier Dahan's La Vie En Rose, for which Marion Cotillard won an Oscar. So what can there possibly be left to say?

M&S set to add to high street gloom

Marks & Spencer is expected to add to the gloom on the high street tomorrow when the retail bellwether posts its fourth quarter trading update.

This is not just British food... M&S hits Paris

After ten years of greatly lamented absence, the British sausage is returning to Paris; as is Wiltshire cured back bacon and Cornish Cruncher cheese. Marks & Spencer yesterday confirmed that it was opening a new store on the Champs Elysées this autumn.

John Lichfield: Walk the streets of Paris to see how polarised France is

My pedestrian commute from office to home takes me up the Champs-Elysées and through the tourist tunnel beneath the Arc de Triomphe. Most evenings, I come across two forms of street theatre which symbolise the parallel, non-communicating universes of 21st-century France.

Paris in the springtime

Yes, now really is the best time to enjoy the French capital before the heat and the hordes of summer arrive. By Harriet O'Brien

I Was Douglas Adams's Flatmate, By Andrew McGibbon

Andrew McGibbon currently makes a living as a writer and producer of broadcast comedy. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, however, he played drums in Morrissey's backing band. This brush with celebrity became the basis of a radio programme, which grew into a Radio 4 series – and which has now resulted in this odd collection of interviews with people who were once on first-name terms with the famous. "One person's unique encounter with a legend, by way of factotemry [or] flatmatery," McGibbon explains, creates "an unusual and very personal insight into the famous one, highlighting the ordinary... things about them or their behaviour that demythologise them." The dozen legends are almost all from a different era of fame, when celebrities were known for something other than celebrity itself. But besides that distinction, they're a bafflingly eclectic bunch.

John Lichfield: Note to M&S – Paris is pining for your sausages

I have terrible news for Parisian Anglophiles and British expatriates in Paris. The British sausage and the pork pie are not, after all, returning to the French capital. Ten years after its hurried, Dunkirk-like departure from the continent, Marks & Spencer plans to open a new store in Paris. The location is perfect. M&S will take over a 1,000sq m store on the Champs-Elysées, just a few yards from the office that I share with the BBC (or, as I try to tell visitors, the BBC shares with me).

Pin-up girls – and one man – go mainstream

French and American approaches to eroticism or, if you prefer, exploitation of women, collided bizarrely in the centre of Paris yesterday.

Travel challenge: Romantic Paris

Every week competing companies give us their best deal for a specific holiday. Today: a romantic weekend for two in Paris. Prices are per person, based on a Friday 11 February departure.

Album: Mahler, Symphony No 4 – Orchestre des Champs-Elysées (Outhear)

The 19th-century woodwind instruments infuse Philippe Herreweghe's account of Mahler's Fourth with the thick green smell of buds and leaves.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Syria civil war: Meet the military commander who says his soldiers will not rest until every inch of their war torn country is free of Islamist 'terrorists'

‘We won’t stop until Syria is back to normal’

Near the front lines with Islamist-controlled towns where Assad’s troops were besieged just last month, Robert Fisk meets a commander confidently preparing his soldiers for battle
The inside story of how Bill Clinton built a $2bn global foundation may undermine Hillary's chances

The inside story of how Bill Clinton built a $2bn global foundation...

... and how it may undermine Hillary's chances in 2016
12 best olive oils

Extra-virgin, cold-press, early-harvest, ultra-premium: 12 best olive oils

Choosing an olive oil is a surprising minefield. Save yourself the hassle with our handy guide
Rafa Benitez Real Madrid unveiling: New manager full of emotion at Bernabeu homecoming

Benitez full of emotion at Bernabeu homecoming

There were tears in the former Liverpool manager’s eyes as he was unveiled as Real Madrid coach. But the Spaniard knows he must make tough decisions if he is to succeed
Sepp Blatter resignation: The beginning of Fifa's long road to reform?

Does Blatter's departure mean Fifa will automatically clean up its act?

Don't bet on it, says Tom Peck
Charles Kennedy: The baby of the House who grew into a Lib Dem giant

The baby of the House who grew into a Lib Dem giant

Charles Kennedy was consistently a man of the centre-left, dedicated to social justice, but was also a champion of liberty and an opponent of the nanny-state, says Baroness Williams
Syria civil war: The harrowing testament of a five-year-old victim of this endless conflict

The harrowing testament of a five-year-old victim of Syria's endless civil war

Sahar Qanbar lost her mother and brother as civilians and government soldiers fought side by side after being surrounded by brutal Islamist fighters. Robert Fisk visited her
The future of songwriting: How streaming is changing everything we know about making music

The future of songwriting

How streaming is changing everything we know about making music
William Shemin and Henry Johnson: Jewish and black soldiers receive World War I Medal of Honor amid claims of discrimination

Recognition at long last

Jewish and black soldiers who fought in WWI finally receive medals after claims of discrimination
Beating obesity: The new pacemaker which helps over-eaters

Beating obesity

The new pacemaker which helps over-eaters
9 best women's festival waterproofs

Ready for rain: 9 best women's festival waterproofs

These are the macs to keep your denim dry and your hair frizz-free(ish)
Cycling World Hour Record: Nervous Sir Bradley Wiggins ready for pain as he prepares to go distance

Wiggins worried

Nervous Sir Bradley ready for pain as he prepares to attempt cycling's World Hour Record
Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Reds baulk at Christian Benteke £32.5m release clause
On your feet! Spending at least two hours a day standing reduces the risk of heart attacks, cancer and diabetes, according to new research

On your feet!

Spending half the day standing 'reduces risk of heart attacks and cancer'
With scores of surgeries closing, what hope is there for the David Cameron's promise of 5,000 more GPs and a 24/7 NHS?

The big NHS question

Why are there so few new GPs when so many want to study medicine?