News Rohan Glynn with his two Dalmations and German Pointer

If you go down to the woods today you’re sure for a big surprise – especially if you have dogs.

Bogus doctor who ruined lives is jailed

A BOGUS doctor, who made thousands of pounds and ruined hundreds of lives with his phoney diagnoses, was jailed for five years at the Old Bailey yesterday.

Organ test may lead to mass CJD screening

THE GOVERNMENT is planning to carry out tests on thousands of appendix and tonsil specimens kept in hospital laboratories for evidence of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease - the human form of BSE.

Independent Collector: A window into the intimate secrets of the body

TO MENTION "body parts" and "art" in the same breath is to raise visions of foetus earrings and stolen cadavers. But there are legal ways of revealing the sculptural aesthetics of, say, the penis - or, as Annie Cattrell shows here, the heart and lungs.

Low pay threat to cancer test jobs

THE CERVICAL screening programme that examines samples from four million women a year for early warning signs of cancer cannot find staff to do the work because they can earn more checking groceries at a supermarket.

Checkout staff are earning more than cancer technicians

THE CERVICAL screening programme which checks four million women a year for early warning signs of cancer cannot find staff to do the work because they can earn more checking groceries at a supermarket checkout.

Monica grilled for six hours

Lewinsky case: Investigators check Clinton's DNA against samples found on dress as intern returns

Waiting For The Miracle

Thousands of people in Britain are desperate for a child, and that longing can ruin lives and marriages. Infertility is a lottery - but so is access to NHS treatment. This is one couple's story

Obituary: Dr Waryam Singh

EYEBROWS WERE raised in certain quarters of polite Edinburgh society when in 1991, a somewhat obscure Sikh ear, nose and throat surgeon from one of their suburbs was nominated for the Annual Great Scot of the Year Award for medicine. It's not every year that Scotland can boast a Nobel prizewinner in Medicine or Science, so Waryam Singh was not surprisingly pipped at the post by Sir James Black, though it was Singh's nomination that caught the public imagination and, having met at the Downing Street reception, he and Black became fast friends. The Nobel laureate hinted darkly on more than one occasion that he regarded Singh as a far more ingenious man than himself.

Health: Why pigeons need a health warning

Richard Irons got pneumonia. He was horrified when he discovered the source.

Celsis board rejects cash bid

CELSIS International, the laboratory equipment group, yesterday rejected a bid by its former chief executive for one of its subsidiaries, as it revealed that it had received a number of approaches which could lead to a takeover of the whole company.

Shortages of blood may delay operations

OPERATIONS may be cancelled, depending on patients' blood types, because of a crisis in stocks of the most common Group O, it emerged yesterday.

Claims about HIV and babies are proved false

A RE-EXAMINATION of data on babies that appear to have "cleaned out" HIV from their systems shows that such claims are false. The dramatic finding shows that "transient" infection with the virus that causes Aids is probably a mirage caused by sloppy laboratory practice, according to a team of American scientists.

British team leads race for cancer `cure'

BRITISH scientists expect to beat American colleagues to be the first to test a new approach to cancer treatment in humans which works by cutting the blood supply to the tumour.

Deadly disease from pigeons triggers alarm

DOCTORS have warned of a big increase in the number of people catching infections from pigeons and other wild birds.

Obituary: George Hitchings

GEORGE HITCHINGS was an outstanding discoverer of medicines which have given benefit to sufferers all over the world. He devised Daraprim for malaria and Zyloric for gout, both exceptional remedies which have stood the test of time; but the main application of his work was in cancer chemotherapy.
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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement