News Rohan Glynn with his two Dalmations and German Pointer

If you go down to the woods today you’re sure for a big surprise – especially if you have dogs.

Bogus doctor who ruined lives is jailed

A BOGUS doctor, who made thousands of pounds and ruined hundreds of lives with his phoney diagnoses, was jailed for five years at the Old Bailey yesterday.

Organ test may lead to mass CJD screening

THE GOVERNMENT is planning to carry out tests on thousands of appendix and tonsil specimens kept in hospital laboratories for evidence of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease - the human form of BSE.

Independent Collector: A window into the intimate secrets of the body

TO MENTION "body parts" and "art" in the same breath is to raise visions of foetus earrings and stolen cadavers. But there are legal ways of revealing the sculptural aesthetics of, say, the penis - or, as Annie Cattrell shows here, the heart and lungs.

Low pay threat to cancer test jobs

THE CERVICAL screening programme that examines samples from four million women a year for early warning signs of cancer cannot find staff to do the work because they can earn more checking groceries at a supermarket.

Checkout staff are earning more than cancer technicians

THE CERVICAL screening programme which checks four million women a year for early warning signs of cancer cannot find staff to do the work because they can earn more checking groceries at a supermarket checkout.

Monica grilled for six hours

Lewinsky case: Investigators check Clinton's DNA against samples found on dress as intern returns

Waiting For The Miracle

Thousands of people in Britain are desperate for a child, and that longing can ruin lives and marriages. Infertility is a lottery - but so is access to NHS treatment. This is one couple's story

Obituary: Dr Waryam Singh

EYEBROWS WERE raised in certain quarters of polite Edinburgh society when in 1991, a somewhat obscure Sikh ear, nose and throat surgeon from one of their suburbs was nominated for the Annual Great Scot of the Year Award for medicine. It's not every year that Scotland can boast a Nobel prizewinner in Medicine or Science, so Waryam Singh was not surprisingly pipped at the post by Sir James Black, though it was Singh's nomination that caught the public imagination and, having met at the Downing Street reception, he and Black became fast friends. The Nobel laureate hinted darkly on more than one occasion that he regarded Singh as a far more ingenious man than himself.

Health: Why pigeons need a health warning

Richard Irons got pneumonia. He was horrified when he discovered the source.

Celsis board rejects cash bid

CELSIS International, the laboratory equipment group, yesterday rejected a bid by its former chief executive for one of its subsidiaries, as it revealed that it had received a number of approaches which could lead to a takeover of the whole company.

Shortages of blood may delay operations

OPERATIONS may be cancelled, depending on patients' blood types, because of a crisis in stocks of the most common Group O, it emerged yesterday.

Claims about HIV and babies are proved false

A RE-EXAMINATION of data on babies that appear to have "cleaned out" HIV from their systems shows that such claims are false. The dramatic finding shows that "transient" infection with the virus that causes Aids is probably a mirage caused by sloppy laboratory practice, according to a team of American scientists.

British team leads race for cancer `cure'

BRITISH scientists expect to beat American colleagues to be the first to test a new approach to cancer treatment in humans which works by cutting the blood supply to the tumour.

Deadly disease from pigeons triggers alarm

DOCTORS have warned of a big increase in the number of people catching infections from pigeons and other wild birds.

Obituary: George Hitchings

GEORGE HITCHINGS was an outstanding discoverer of medicines which have given benefit to sufferers all over the world. He devised Daraprim for malaria and Zyloric for gout, both exceptional remedies which have stood the test of time; but the main application of his work was in cancer chemotherapy.
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In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible