News Rohan Glynn with his two Dalmations and German Pointer

If you go down to the woods today you’re sure for a big surprise – especially if you have dogs.

Leading article: Heart lifting

The tale of Matthew Green is an inspiring one. The 40-year-old has been given an artificial heart by Papworth Hospital in Cambridge. This is the first time a British person has benefited from this medical technology.

First ever transplant of organ grown in laboratory

A 36-year-old man is recovering after surgeons implanted the world's first wholly lab-grown organ into his body.

IVF with a gentle touch

Tracy Sant was told she couldn't have children, but a 'mild' fertility treatment worked. Why aren't more women offered this option?

Manchester United legend Bryan Robson has cancer

Former England captain Bryan Robson has undergone surgery for throat cancer, Manchester United said today.

Stem cell breakthrough could end shortage of vital blood cells

Patients undergoing chemotherapy or organ transplants may soon be treated with a vital blood-clotting agent derived from the stem cells of human embryos.

Doctor may be sued for criticism of breast enhancement cream

A doctor has been threatened with a libel action after claiming that a £125 breast enhancement cream did not work.

Lily Allen's illness reveals danger of blood poisoning

Lily Allen’s hospitalisation with septicaemia has focused attention on a little understood but potentially fatal condition which affects thousands of people every year.

Scientists grow human livers in laboratory

Breakthrough could solve the shortage of organs for transplant and improve testing of drugs

It's official: A small dose of Prozac can help beat PMS

Treatment could be universally available within two years

Scientists reveal bacteria have 'noses'

Common bacteria have "noses" that respond to smells, scientists said.

Scientific breakthrough as red blood cells are made from IVF embryos

British scientists have turned stem cells from spare IVF embryos into red blood cells as part of a project to manufacture synthetic blood on an industrial-scale. It is believed to be the first time in Britain that human red blood cells have been created from embryonic stem cells and it marks a milestone in a project aimed at producing blood for medical transfusions.

Anger at MoD delays over scientist's inquest

The family of a Ministry of Defence scientist who died during secret explosives testing hit out yesterday at alleged "inadequate" safety procedures and delays in getting answers.

Stem cell treatment set for UK tests

A stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis is to be tested on patients for the first time in the UK.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, By Rebecca Skloot

In 1951 Henrietta Lacks, a poor 31-year-old African-American woman living in Baltimore County, died from cervical cancer. This would normally have been the simple end of a personal tragedy but the tumour that killed her proved unusual. Tissue removed without her knowledge was shown by Dr George Gey at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, to have the power of eternal reproduction, immortality. Henrietta's cell line, known as HeLa, has spawned a vast body of research. Its first dramatic use was in testing the Salk polio virus in 1952 and it has contributed greatly to mapping the human genome. As genetic knowledge has increased we can see how remarkable HeLa is: not really a human cell line at all, because it involves a genetic fusion of a papilloma virus and Henrietta Lacks's cervical cells. The hybrid has its own stable genome and attempts have been made to have the cell line recognised as a species in its own right. It is interesting to compare the case of HeLa with the news that the US biologist and entrepreneur Craig Venter has created an artificial bacterium. Apart from some fancy additions of DNA puzzles and an email address inserted into the genome, Venter's bacterium isn't new at all, just synthetic. The HeLa genome, on the other hand, is a novel cell line that has reproduced faithfully over 60 years.

Leading article: The final goal could be in sight

In the mid-1990s, the development of anti-retroviral drugs was hailed as the answer to a modern plague. By converting a lethal infection into a chronic disease, which sufferers could live with rather than die from, they transformed the outlook for millions.

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Homeless Veterans appeal: 'You look for someone who's an inspiration and try to be like them'

Homeless Veterans appeal

In 2010, Sgt Gary Jamieson stepped on an IED in Afghanistan and lost his legs and an arm. He reveals what, and who, helped him to make a remarkable recovery
Could cannabis oil reverse the effects of cancer?

Could cannabis oil reverse effects of cancer?

As a film following six patients receiving the controversial treatment is released, Kate Hilpern uncovers a very slippery issue
The Interview movie review: You can't see Seth Rogen and James Franco's Kim Jong Un assassination film, but you can read about it here

The Interview movie review

You can't see Seth Rogen and James Franco's Kim Jong Un assassination film, but you can read about it here
Serial mania has propelled podcasts into the cultural mainstream

How podcasts became mainstream

People have consumed gripping armchair investigation Serial with a relish typically reserved for box-set binges
Jesus Christ has become an unlikely pin-up for hipster marketing companies

Jesus Christ has become an unlikely pin-up

Kevin Lee Light, aka "Jesus", is the newest client of creative agency Mother while rival agency Anomaly has launched Sexy Jesus, depicting the Messiah in a series of Athena-style poses
Rosetta space mission voted most important scientific breakthrough of 2014

A memorable year for science – if not for mice

The most important scientific breakthroughs of 2014
Christmas cocktails to make you merry: From eggnog to Brown Betty and Rum Bumpo

Christmas cocktails to make you merry

Mulled wine is an essential seasonal treat. But now drinkers are rediscovering other traditional festive tipples. Angela Clutton raises a glass to Christmas cocktails
5 best activity trackers

Fitness technology: 5 best activity trackers

Up the ante in your regimen and change the habits of a lifetime with this wearable tech
Paul Scholes column: It's a little-known fact, but I have played one of the seven dwarves

Paul Scholes column

It's a little-known fact, but I have played one of the seven dwarves
Fifa's travelling circus once again steals limelight from real stars

Fifa's travelling circus once again steals limelight from real stars

Club World Cup kicked into the long grass by the continued farce surrounding Blatter, Garcia, Russia and Qatar
Frank Warren column: 2014 – boxing is back and winning new fans

Frank Warren: Boxing is back and winning new fans

2014 proves it's now one of sport's biggest hitters again
Jeb Bush vs Hillary Clinton: The power dynamics of the two first families

Jeb Bush vs Hillary Clinton

Karen Tumulty explores the power dynamics of the two first families
Stockholm is rivalling Silicon Valley with a hotbed of technology start-ups

Stockholm is rivalling Silicon Valley

The Swedish capital is home to two of the most popular video games in the world, as well as thousands of technology start-ups worth hundreds of millions of pounds – and it's all happened since 2009
Did Japanese workers really get their symbols mixed up and display Santa on a crucifix?

Crucified Santa: Urban myth refuses to die

The story goes that Japanese store workers created a life-size effigy of a smiling "Father Kurisumasu" attached to a facsimile of Our Lord's final instrument of torture
Jennifer Saunders and Kate Moss join David Walliams on set for TV adaptation of The Boy in the Dress

The Boy in the Dress: On set with the stars

Walliams' story about a boy who goes to school in a dress will be shown this Christmas