i In the frame: Eileen Cooper accuses the art world of failing women

Meet Eileen Cooper: she wants to shake up the art world.

Read: Zeros and ones

In an age where technological development is driven by what Sadie Plant calls "industrial-strength testosterone", the self-proclaimed cyber- prophet insists that the female contribution to technology has been severely underestimated. Having recently established the Department of New Technology at Warwick University - and a club night in Birmingham - Plant's mission is to obliterate commonly-held preconceptions regarding computer science. With a balance of wit and truculence, Zeros and Ones sheds ground-breaking light on women's compatibility with computers, enthusiastically predicting men's redundancy within this traditionally male territory in the course of the 21st century.

Fast and easy way to cut a long story short

Summarising a text is a key human skill. But can software do it? Roderick Neil Kay looks at progress

Artificial brains to stop fraud

Audits of the big corporations are about to go through a revolution to cope with a phenomenal growth in use of the Internet for business-to- business transactions. That is increasing the risk of hackers and internal fraud, forcing auditors to become experts in data encryption, "firewalls" and on-line identity authentication.

Conversations with Converse

A team of British researchers has won a contest to create a computer program which holds a "conversation" so naturally it is difficult to distinguish it from a human. The creators claim similar systems could eventually replace humans in some jobs, such as counselling. They could even become companions more valued than pets.

Letter: Turing and the artificial mind

Sir: Michael Lockwood ("Man v Machine", 13 May), like so many others, has overrated the Turing test. The Turing test is not some goal or benchmark artificial intelligence (AI) researchers are (or should be) shooting for. It is a thought experiment designed to get us each to ask ourselves, "How do I know that anything other than myself experiences consciousness?" If we give each other the benefit of the doubt, then why not extend that to something that passes the Turing test?

Letter: Deep Blue is not that clever

Sir: While the victory of Deep Blue over Garry Kasparov demonstrates that the machine certainly does play a mean game of chess, the implications for artificial intelligence are less clear.

Man v machine

Does the defeat of Kasparov by the Deep Blue computer mean that humans are no longer the only possessors of true intelligence?

Long live the liberal dinosaur

Is the traditional arts course, not directly linked to jobs, to be seen as 'useless' in post-Thatcherite Britain?

Fine for boy who hacked into Pentagon

A British teenager who got a D grade in A-level computer science was fined yesterday for hacking into United States defence and missile systems and removing files on artificial intelligence and battle management.

Serbs stay on the march to hasten reform

Thousands of Serbian demonstrators, their anger undimmed by presidential promises to respect the opposition's local election victories, marched through Belgrade yesterday, demanding proof that political reform is on the way. Despite President Slobodan Milosevic's promise that his government will respect the results of 14 town councils won by Zajedno, the opposition coalition, on 17 November, the protesters are cautious about claiming victory.

Computerised CV-cruncher fills the job

There was a time when employers relied on an eye for a good CV, a probing interview technique and a healthy sense of scepticism to seek out top graduates during their annual recruitment round. Today, they have a new weapon in the battle to pick the best staff for the job - artificial intelligence.

Britain on-line for first election on the Internet

Political junkies eager for John Major to name the date of the general election will be relieved to learn that coverage of campaign '97 will kick off in earnest in only three days' time - on the Internet.

How close are we to creating HAL on Earth?

Happy birthday, HAL. Scientists around the world are preparing to celebrate the "birth" of the world's most famous fictional computer who, in 2001: A Space Odyssey, was first switched on in January 1997.

Computing skills for Catch 22

There's good news and bad news. The good news is that there is a jobs boom in the IT market after five years of recession. IT directors now cannot find enough good people. Job advertisements in the IT trade newspapers, such as Computer Weekly, are at an all-time peak. The forecast is that the boom will continue for at least another year to 18 months.

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General Election 2015: ‘We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon’, says Ed Balls

'We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon'

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VE Day 70th anniversary: How ordinary Britons celebrated the end of war in Europe

How ordinary Britons celebrated VE Day

Our perception of VE Day usually involves crowds of giddy Britons casting off the shackles of war with gay abandon. The truth was more nuanced
They came in with William Caxton's printing press, but typefaces still matter in the digital age

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Discovery of 'missing link' between the two main life-forms on Earth could explain evolution of animals, say scientists

'Missing link' between Earth's two life-forms found

New microbial species tells us something about our dark past, say scientists
The Pan Am Experience is a 'flight' back to the 1970s that never takes off - at least, not literally

Pan Am Experience: A 'flight' back to the 70s

Tim Walker checks in and checks out a four-hour journey with a difference
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Crisp sales are in decline - but this tasty trivia might tempt back the turncoats

Crisp sales are in decline

As a nation we're filling up on popcorn and pitta chips and forsaking their potato-based predecessors
Ronald McDonald the muse? Why Banksy, Ron English and Keith Coventry are lovin' Maccy D's

Ronald McDonald the muse

A new wave of artists is taking inspiration from the fast food chain
13 best picnic blankets

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Barcelona vs Bayern Munich player ratings

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Martin Guptill: Explosive New Zealand batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

Explosive batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

Martin Guptill has smashed early runs for Derbyshire and tells Richard Edwards to expect more from the 'freakish' Brendon McCullum and his buoyant team during their tour of England
General Election 2015: Ed Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

He was meant to be Labour's biggest handicap - but has become almost an asset
General Election 2015: A guide to the smaller parties, from the the National Health Action Party to the Church of the Militant Elvis Party

On the margins

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Amr Darrag: Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister in exile still believes Egypt's military regime can be replaced with 'moderate' Islamic rule

'This is the battle of young Egypt for the future of our country'

Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister Amr Darrag still believes the opposition can rid Egypt of its military regime and replace it with 'moderate' Islamic rule, he tells Robert Fisk
Why patients must rely less on doctors: Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'

Why patients must rely less on doctors

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