Arts and Entertainment Damien Hirst,

Damien Hirst has today unveiled a new spot painting based on Disney character Mickey Mouse.

Glover's Mistake, by Nick Laird

In the room, the men come and go

Oligart: The heiress selling British works to the Russians

Just a year ago, the sweet smell of chocolate filled the air inside the majestic Red October factory, as millions of bars of Russia's most famous confectionery brand came off the production line.

Hit & Run: Lost in music

It's tempting to hope that The Beatles' fabled 14-minute track "Carnival of Light", which Paul McCartney wants to release 41 years after its recording, will be a magnificent avant-garde assemblage of noise. But the truth is that just because it was John, Paul, George and Ringo wandering around the studio banging things and shouting "Barcelona!" doesn't mean the result will be a masterpiece, no matter how often McCartney mentions Karlheinz Stockhausen. It was never released because the other Beatles thought it "too adventurous". This is the same band that would release such fare as "Revolution 9" on The White Album, so chances are that "too adventurous" was their way of gently letting Paul know that "Carnival of Light" was a bit rubbish.

Imitation of life: He almost duped Andy Warhol's estate. Now Charles Lutz is targeting the auctioneers

In the wake of Damien Hirst's ground-breaking Sotheby's sale this week, which fetched a jaw-dropping £111.5m, what could be more timely than an exhibition that explores the notions of authenticity and value in the modern art market – and fetishises those involved? The Brooklyn-based artist Charles Lutz, a former assistant of the American king of kitsch Jeff Koons, was so intrigued by the cult of the modern artist that he meticulously copied Andy Warhol's 1954 Self Portrait with silver hair 12 times, in four different colour versions. He then submitted his forgeries to the Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board. There, they were officially stamped with "Denied" and returned to the artist, who promptly put the tampered-with works on show.

Is the National Gallery prostituting itself just to pull in the punters?

A walk-through installation that recreates Amsterdam's red light district would not look out of place in the Tate Modern's immense Turbine Hall. But Hoerengracht – Dutch for whore's alley – is among the highlights of the National Gallery's exhibition programme for 2009.

Leading article: Artistic endeavour

When Sir Nicholas Serota took over as head of the Tate Gallery 20 years ago, Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin were still at college, the Turner Prize was in its infancy, and the Tate was still called the Tate. Many of the changes in the art world since 1988 – the championing of Brit Art, the rise of conceptualism and the dramatic expansion of the Tate itself – can be laid at Sir Nicholas's door. So it is little wonder that he has been reappointed by the Tate's trustees. One can quibble with the secrecy in which they made thedecision – they knew a month ago but kept quiet, and they have notsaid if there were other candidates. Nevertheless, the decision issurely the correct one.

What's the best way to keep a secret? Tell the world the details on your website

Gossip is really only interesting if it looks as though you're trying to hide something

Mona Hatoum: present tense, Parasol Unit Foundation for Contemporary Art, London

Maps are an abiding motif for the artist Mona Hatoum. A small carpet, like a prayer mat, depicts a map of the world. Sections seem to have been eroded to leave a negative space in the form of Peter's Projection, which reveals the true proportions of distributed land mass, as opposed to that which is shown on traditional Western maps.

Tom Friedman: Monsters and Stuff, Gagosian Gallery, London

There are a group of contemporary artists who are hunter-gatherers. They collect ordinary "stuff" and transform it into something magical. Tom Friedman is at the forefront of this school which also includes other Americans, Sarah Sze and the late Jason Rhoades, and British artist Tony Cragg. Friedman is the master of alchemy, not only collecting and arranging as Sze and Rhoades largely do but often using new materials. Unlike traditional alchemists Friedman is not turning base metal into gold but pencil shavings into expensive art works. Paper cups, dental floss, dust, pencil sharpenings, and hair of all varieties are here.

Learning Chinese

Anyone considering doing some work or study in China would be sensible to know a bit about the language before they leave.

National Gallery head: don't forget the old masters

Nicholas Penny, the newly appointed director of the National Gallery, yesterday expressed concern over the art industry's obsession with contemporary works to the exclusion of older paintings.

Pop artist attacks 'disgraceful' price inflation

One of Britain's most eminent artists has criticised the "distasteful" trend for ever-rising art prices – just days before a leading auction house launches a sale that could fetch more than £72m, smashing all records for the contemporary art market.

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