Arts and Entertainment

When you're hot … Nile Rodgers has every right to do this in the glow of his Daft Punk moment, namely to rake the coals of his august 1970s/1980s Chic "Organization" – less a disco group than a business model, more an aesthetic code than a production style.

First Night: The Long Blondes, Amersham Arms, London

Not yet great, but proof that many Long Blondes can still have fun

Style Police: It's a jungle out there

Animal prints are loud and excessive this autumn. Think Bet Lynch on a bad day, says James Sherwood

REAL CLOTHES

Alice Old, 10

Terry Wogan is a SAGA kind of guy. So is Des Lynam . But then, so too is ......... You can't pigeon hole Britain's growing army of over- fifties. They've cast off their slippers, chucked out their flasks and now, with the help of their own radio station, the baby boomers are hell-bent on world domination. You have been warned...

"All we need," sang Freddie Mercury to gleeful crowds of twentysomethings at the Live Aid concert, "is Radio Gaga..." Fourteen years on, nearly 50,000 ageing readers of Saga magazine have decided that, give or take a consonant, it's all they need. Of the multitude of over-fifties who responded to a questionnaire published recently in the million-selling Crumblies' Monthly, an overwhelming four-fifths said they would like a radio station which was like "a broadcast version" of the magazine.

Arts and Books: The Week in Review

THE FILM

Fashion: The Style Police: Tales from the trailer park

Forget about boho chic and urban wear, Blondie's back in town and that can only mean one thing: trash glamour is making a comeback. James Sherwood reports

Album revews

Blondie "No Exit" (Beyond) Debbie Harry has re-started where she left off - which is somewhere in the miserable, kitsch 1980s. This "pop" album drops in ska, blues, prog, hillbilly, folk and basically every other influence and it's all - with the possible exception of the "Maria" single - painful. A sad and unnecessary album. H

The flying Scotswoman

Shirley Manson from Garbage is rarely at home. Glyn Brown finds out why

Why are they famous: Debbie Harry

Main Claim

Pop: Still a hit girl after all these years

BLONDIE

Jazz: Very post-mod: very New York

"SO YOU all come from round here?", John Lurie asks the audience at Salisbury Playhouse, in a transaction that could one day be used for an academic paper on "Problems of Communication in Socio-Linguistics". No one replies. "There's no need to be so blase," he continues. "I mean, you live next to Stonehenge, right?" Still no reply. "I live next to the World Trade Center," Lurie deadpans. "But we know how that was constructed." Well I laughed, anyway. Looking like a particularly degenerate bank manager in his baggy grey suit, Lurie demonstrated the differences in social manners between Wiltshire and the Lower East Side all too well. He also played the saxophone and led his nine-piece band, the Lounge Lizards, up what often seemed a long and very hard climb, until at last they reached the summit (as in the end of their set-list), and were even forced to come back and do an encore.

Blondie legend swings back into vogue

DEBBIE HARRY, the face of the Seventies pop group Blondie, sang for a jazz band at the Barbican in London last night after confirming that her pop comeback plans were in full swing.

And we thought it was all over. Well it isn't now

REMEMBER the 1970s? Currently undergoing a revival, with a recent festival on the South Bank in London and the success of nostalgic films like Boogie Nights, they were chiefly famous for - what exactly? Ted Heath, Olivia Newton John, Jim Callaghan, glam rock, The Generation Game, the Queen's silver jubilee, folk groups with singers who cupped their hands over their ears - and Saturday Night Fever. When I went to see the new stage version in London last week, the audience consisted mainly of people who were too young to remember the movie, although John Travolta's white suit has clearly inscribed itself deep into the collective unconscious.

Pop: Justified confidence

theaudience 100 Club, London

Hit or miss... it's a hard day's Spice

The world trembles with anticipation to see whether `Spiceworld - The Movie' is, as has been suggested, the natural heiress to `A Hard Day's Night' or just one more embarrassment in the tradition of such long-forgotten stinkers as `Gonks Go Beat' and `Live It Up'. Andy Gill considers the scary challenge facing Ginger and Co.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
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Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn