Arts and Entertainment East Enders: Whistler’s Wapping, is all about the hectic activity of barges and lighters, as seen from The Angel

American painter James Whilster's Thames depictions are considered ahead of a new exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery

Visual Arts: Portrait of the artist as a young man (going on sixty)

Painter, poet, printmaker, collector, composer, curator, sculptor, singer, translator... At 60, the polymathic Mr Phillips is still just trying to do what he's always done: be an artist as best he can. Profile by Andrew Lambirth

The Arts: Taking a quick look at the dead

Anamorphic skulls, a head made of blood, the morbid sensibilities of the pre-Raphaelites and the last days of Richelieu. Richard D North goes on a funereal procession through the major London exhibitions but finds, as the seasonal excesses move into high gear, that he has plenty to smile about.

All wrapped up, nowhere to go

The Courtauld Gallery closes tomorrow for refurbishment: some works will be lent, others stored. Vanessa Thorpe reports

VISUAL ARTS Stephen Cox Dulwich Picture Gallery, London

Dulwich Picture Gallery, as its name suggests, is not a place where one expects to see sculpture. Paintings are their thing, old ones mostly, including some of London's best works by Rembrandt, Watteau and Poussin. This summer, however, the place has a pointedly different feel thanks to an exhibition of sculpture by Stephen Cox.

Letter: Free for a day

Sir: Eleanor Boyle (Letters, 30 June) will be pleased to know that we at Dulwich Picture Gallery operate exactly the Continental free day system, which she advocates. Normally the Gallery costs pounds 3 or pounds 1.50 concession, with free admission for children and the unemployed; on Friday it is free for all. England's oldest public art gallery receives no revenue funding from the state.

We need light to read by, not to be dazzled by, to find our way through corridors, not to be lit up like escaping prisoners-of-war

Thank you for your cacophony of letters on the subject of noise. You clearly feel strongly about the extraordinary volume and ever-increasing sources of noise we are subject to. Writing this, I have just got off a Docklands Light Railway train that took over half an hour to complete the brief run from Bank to Canary Wharf. During that time, the "train captain" was unable to stop wittering over the PA system, at the top of his voice, misinforming "customers" about computer problems (bring back steam), signal problems, points problems and all problems to Island Gardens. Thirty minutes of Tony Hancock, fine (30 minutes of John Cage even better); but 30 minutes of reverberating verbal junk, when 30 seconds would have been more than necessary, did seem to upset passengers, although not those who, glued to thunderous personal stereos, would have been oblivious to all announcements, even one warning them that King Kong was about to pick up the horrid little train and eat it.

THE 100 BEST PAINTINGS IN BRITAIN? PART 2

Which are our greatest works of art? Richard Inglebyasked 100 experts to pick their 10 favourite paintings. Theresults, published this week and next, may surprise youfour seasons in one day lying in the depths of your imagination worlds above and worlds below the sun shines on the black clouds hanging over the domain even when your feeling warm the temperature can drop

The ghost behind the Gainsborough

X-rays reveal hidden masterpiece

The kiss at Piccadilly Circus ...

A new lovers' guide to Paris has been published. London needs one too, writes Hester Lacey

Say it with flowers

Politics, death and wonder. And you thought they were just Dutch flower paintings. By Andrew Graham-Dixon

Death, where is thy art?

Tombs may seem a morbid subject, but to the architect Sir John Soane they were a source of undying fascination and inspiration. By Jonathan Glancey

Visual Arts: Death, Passion and Politics Dulwich Picture Gallery, London

On May Day 1633, Sir Kenelm Digby, on entering his wife's bedchamber, was unable to awaken her. She had died in her sleep. Her death, which opens the final chapter of one of the great love stories of the 17th century, is the focus of an enthralling exhibition at the Dulwich Picture Gallery.

ARTS : Our friends electric

Though it has loomed large in our landscape since the 1930s, the much-maligned L12 electricity pylon is finally being phased out. Jonathan Glancey bids a fond farewell to a British design classic

Big money goes to small projects

Millennium funding: Low-level schemes to get benefit as commissioners step back from landmark proposals

London, virtually

London, virtually
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