Life and Style Courgette (or zucchini) flowers

This week I've been eating... courgette flowers

Personal finance: Same funds, different fees

Although dauntingly different at first sight, many offshore funds run by UK fund managers have identical investment objectives to their onshore siblings. But, warns Abigail Montrose, investors should beware of different charges levied on each product.

A bad week for Australia just got worse ...

It was radical Germaine at her most fiery. In a blistering attack on the racism of her native land, Dr Germaine Greer said last week that she would never return to live in Australia unless Aboriginal sovereignty was acknowledged, went on to demand that the Upper House in Canberra be composed entirely of Aborigines, and observed that all white Australians were secretly slightly mad.

Sun, sea, sand and suspicion

Jersey is fighting to protect its reputation against an increasing influx of money launderers. David Callaway reports

Obituary: James Stevens Cox

I first got to know James Stevens Cox when, many years ago, my family handled the sale of his hairdressing collection, writes Edward Maggs [further to the obituary by Nicolas Barker, 18 March]. This involved a vast array of hardware, including bigoudis, curling tongs and hairpieces (sadly no merkins, although he was fully trained in their manufacture and delighted in retailing their history). The largest items were an extraordinary and lethal-looking late 18th-century hair-drier fuelled by burning coals and looking, with its almost completely enclosed helmet, more like an instrument of torture; and a first-generation permanent waving machine.

Letter: Save BT museum

Sir: The announcement by BT that it is to close its telecommunications museum (report, 1 March) is a further sign of the social irresponsibility of the privatised utilities.

Divide and prosper

Flats are a growing market, says Rosalind Russell

Divide and prosper

Flats are a growing market, says Rosalind Russell

BOOKS FICTION/POETRY: From hard knocks to bardic rituals

SELECTED POEMS by W S Graham, Faber pounds 9.99

The great escape

As Europe's largest restaurant opens this weekend in London, Peter Popham asks why a nation so indifferent to food is mad about eating out

Letter: Intruded on by pavement cafes

Sir: It is easy to portray local councils objecting to cafe pavement seating in the West End ("Snatch squads strike in council's war on al fresco eating", 8 July) as killjoys. Restaurant owners, who make a great deal of money out of such al fresco extensions, naturally object to losing "free" space, but whose space is it?

Visual Arts Iain Gale SIR MATTHEW SMITH The Barbican, London: REVIEW

Writing of Matthew Smith in 1953, the young Francis Bacon expressed his admiration for "one of the very few English painters since Constable and Turner to be concerned with painting". There is more here than the formalist compliment might lead one to expect, a fact which becomes evident while walking through the Barbican's vast show of Smith's work. Apart from a few landscapes, Smith's entire life was spent painting just two subjects: the still life and the nude. This twin obsession suggests that it was more than mere painterliness which attracted Bacon to the septuagenarian. Both men shared a belief in the single subject - Bacon with the twisted face, the tortured body, the screaming Pope; Smith with the languorous nudes whose emphatic sensuality pumps at us in skeins of hot red and orange from every wall of this exhibition.

Literary envy is certainly not my style, Martin

The Agreeable World of Wallace Arnold

DINE OUT FREE WITH CLUB BON VIVEUR AND THE INDEPENDENT

Today's the day we print our first list of fine Les Routiers restaurants where you can use your Club Bon Viveur card, which was in the Magazine on Saturday, to ensure that one of your party will get a FREE meal.

From apes' house to opera house

Jonathan Glancey salutes the achievements of Ove Arup, the late, great philosophical engineer who was born 100 years ago

Growing up west

A musical traces the history of the Jewish `WestEnders'. David Benedict reports
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Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn