Keys to the future: An Enigma machine at Bletchley Park

Turing's Cathedral: The Origins Of The Digital Universe, By George Dyson

Who invented the computer? This turns out to be a far more complicated question than you might imagine. There is no doubt that it was mathematicians who first conceived of a universally programmable machine, but which mathematicians?

Picture preview: Lucian Freud drawings

This week an exhibition of British painter Lucian Freud's drawings opens at the Blain|Southern gallery in London, staged to coincide with the major exhibition of his work at the National Portrait Gallery.

Simon Kelner: The badge of honour that is refusing a royal gong

All around us, we see the evidence that we are a much more open society than we were, say, 20 years ago. It is in the everyday things, like, for instance, the information we are given on public transport.

Nude Woman in a Red Armchair, by Picasso

Heads Up: Picasso & Modern British Art

How the master of Modernism taught the Brits a lesson

The essence of Bacon on menu at Bonhams

A painting of, rather than by, Francis Bacon takes pride of place at the first sale of Irish art by the auction house Bonhams. Louis le Brocquy's watercolour, entitled Image of Francis Bacon No 18, is estimated at £60,000 to £80,000. Penny Day, the head of Irish art at Bonhams, said Le Brocquy painted Bacon several times, "trying to capture the Bacon-ness of Bacon". One of the smallest, cheapest paintings in the sale is also attracting attention, however. Entitled Roundabout Ponies, it is by Jack Butler Yeats, the brother of the poet William Butler Yeats. He gave it to the matron of his nursing home and it is being sold by her heirs. Ray Tang/Rex Features

London Calling, By Barry Miles

It is apt for a feted London bohemian (who has written extensively on the Beatniks, music and the 1960s) to turn his sights to London's post-war bohemia from which he arose as co-owner of the Indica Gallery (a famed haunt for the 1960's avant garde).

Denis Wirth-Miller: Bohemian artist who enjoyed a close association with Francis Bacon

Denis Wirth-Miller was one of a group of artists who for many years injected the spirit of bohemia into the life of Wivenhoe, a small shipbuilding and repairing town on the Essex coast. The jollifications of Wirth-Miller, his partner, the James Bond illustrator Richard "Dickie" Chopping, and the painter Francis Bacon remain the stuff of local legend.

Album: Simone Dinnerstein, Bach: A Strange Beauty (Sony Classical)

Simone Dinnerstein's title derives from the 16th-century philosopher Francis Bacon's contention that "there is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion", which she illustrates with interpretations of Bach's Keyboard Concertos Nos 1 & 5 and several of his solo piano pieces, of which Kempff's fastidious arrangement of "Nun Freut Euch, Lieben Christen Gmein" offers the most dazzling display of her virtuosity.

Tom Lubbock: Passionate and erudite chief art critic for 'The Independent' and 'The Independent on Sunday'

It is the habit of art critics to review from the inside out, starting with the object and adding bits of history and context to suggest a kind of omniscience.

Contested Will, By James Shapiro

Who wrote Shakespeare? The most famous literary whodunit of all has generated thousands of books and articles, shrill TV documentaries and even a (moot) trial in the US Supreme Court. In Contested Will, James Shapiro sensibly asks what all the fuss is about.

The South Bank Show: Final Cut, By Melvyn Bragg

"They've killed the show", moaned Melvyn Bragg when ITV brought down the kibosh on the arts programme that had become a revered institution over its 32-year (and 110-award) lifespan.

Tanztheater Wuppertal / Pina Bausch, Sadler's Wells, London<br/>Merce Cunningham Dance Company, Barbican Theatre, London

These are unquestionably giants of modern dance, but what contrasts these performances reveal

Encounter, By Milan Kundera

Although this cluster of essays on his favourite pioneers (translated by Linda Asher) does not offer the overarching theorem of a treatise such as The Curtain, Encounter proves that Kundera the critic bracingly matches Kundera the novelist.

Brian Clarke

In last Saturday's article, 'We had a private conversation. I was moved by his modesty', we described Brian Clarke's meeting with the Pope and the item was labelled 'First Person'. We should have made clear it was based on an interview given by Brian Clarke to our journalist rather than being written by Brian Clarke himself. Brian Clarke did not introduce the names of Paul McCartney or Francis Bacon but merely responded to questions put to him by the journalist. We are happy to make this clear.

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