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Writer and philosopher whose work, beginning with ‘The Outsider’, searched for the meaning of man’s existence

Cultural Life: Sandra Bernhard, comedian

Films: I saw 'Never Let Me Go' and found it very impressive. In such a believable way, it incorporates science fiction with the strangeness of the times we actually live in. It was deep, haunting and beautifully shot. My other favourite is 'The King's Speech'. Top drawer!

The original celebrity photographer

As one of the very first society photographers, EO Hoppé captured images of everyone who was anyone in the arts and in politics between the two world wars, on both sides of the Atlantic.

MacCorkindale, star of 'Casualty', dies of cancer

The actor Simon MacCorkindale, who for six years appeared as Dr Harry Harper in the BBC drama Casualty, has died of cancer.

Leading article: Chill, innit

Emma Thompson is working on a remake of My Fair Lady and has suddenly come over all Henry Higgins. "We have to reinvest in the idea of articulacy as a form of personal human freedom and power" the actor has told the Radio Times. "I went to give a talk at my old school and the girls were all doing their 'likes' and 'innits' and 'it ain'ts', which drives me insane. Just don't do it. Because it makes you sound stupid".

You never can tell: George Bernard Shaw, the secret snapper

George Bernard Shaw once wrote: "If Velasquez was born today, he would be a photographer and not a painter." But the Irish playwright may also have thought his true calling lay behind the camera, according to researchers who have rediscovered more than 20,000 of his photographs.

Huge Churchill archive to go online

Sir Winston Churchill's vast written archive is to be put online. The publisher Bloomsbury is to digitise 1 million documents, held in 2,500 boxes in purpose-built vaults at Churchill College in Cambridge, by 2012.

Pygmalion, Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester

Shaw's Pygmalion may not be the smash hit that is My Fair Lady, Lerner and Loewe's creation considered "the perfect musical", but it has more substance. Even with some of the additional scenes which Shaw added, making the ending slightly more long-drawn out than is strictly necessary, Greg Hersov's polished production keeps the top spinning.

The Week In Radio: Relax to arias of outstanding natural beauty

Opera is brilliant for the blood pressure. According to research, Verdi's arias, which follow musical phrases that are 10 seconds long, synchronise perfectly with the natural cardiovascular rhythm. When stroke and cardiac patients were played rousing operatic music like Puccini's Nessun Dorma, full of crescendos and diminuendos that alternately arouse and relax the body, they experienced lowered blood pressure and better outcomes.

Pygmalion: The original and best cockney rebel

As two new productions of Pygmalion hit the stage, Michael Coveney wonders why we can't get enough of Eliza Doolittle

Mrs Warren's Profession, Comedy Theatre, London

How relevant to our own day is Mrs Warren's Profession? Well, the women in the audience may not have purchased their clothing with brothel rents, but how much of it was made in China, where other women are treated worse than the prostitutes from which the title character makes her money? Shaw denounced 19th-century England's discreet silence on its secret investments in the sex industry. Our respect, even adulation, for those who openly profit from it would not, I think, strike him as an improvement. But, while the words of this play ring out clearly, in Michael Rudman's tame production the music, or passion, behind them is muted – the whole can be symbolised by the absurdly prissy little triangle that Mrs Warren's daughter, Vivie, carefully strikes, one standing in for an alarm bell.

Oscars Babylon: Tales from the Academy awards

Tonight, Hollywood's red carpet is rolled out once again for the annual orgy of self-congratulation. But not everything in the history of the Oscars is a cause for back-slapping

Guy Adams: Chaste all round the dancefloor

LA Notebook

Vanya, Gate Theatre, London<br>Too True to be Good, Finborough Theatre, London<br>Fathers Inside, Soho Theatre, London

It's not perfect, but Holcroft's bold take on this classic makes her one to watch

How the garden shed is being reinvented

Sheds aren't what they used to be &ndash; you should make it your business to own one, says Kate Watson-Smyth
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'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Russell Brand's interview with Ed Miliband has got everyone talking about The Trews

Everyone is talking about The Trews

Russell Brand's 'true news' videos attract millions of viewers. But today's 'Milibrand' interview introduced his resolutely amateurish style to a whole new crowd
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before
'Queer saint' Peter Watson left his mark on British culture by bankrolling artworld giants

'Queer saint' who bankrolled artworld giants

British culture owes a huge debt to Peter Watson, says Michael Prodger
Pushkin Prizes: Unusual exchange programme aims to bring countries together through culture

Pushkin Prizes brings countries together

Ten Scottish schoolchildren and their Russian peers attended a creative writing workshop in the Highlands this week
14 best kids' hoodies

14 best kids' hoodies

Don't get caught out by that wind on the beach. Zip them up in a lightweight top to see them through summer to autumn
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The acceptable face of the Emirates

The acceptable face of the Emirates

Has Abu Dhabi found a way to blend petrodollars with principles, asks Robert Fisk