More Cuban political prisoners freed

Seven more political prisoners are to be freed by the Communist government, the Roman Catholic Church said yesterday. Six people convicted of crimes against state security planned to leave for Spain, but one intends to remain in Cuba and return to the independent reporting that led to his arrest. Ivan Hernandez was among 75 people arrested in a crackdown on dissidents in 2003.

Class action: The new faces of student protest

Matthew Bell meets the new faces of student activism as they plan the next round of attacks on the Government's hike in tuition fees

A revolutionary idea to stop firms cashing in on Che artwork

An image of Che Guevara that stares out from countless T-shirts and posters is at the centre of a belated copyright claim to protect it from unfettered use by capitalists.

The beautiful and condemned: Barry Cawston's images of abandoned buildings capture an eerie allure

There's something very American about Barry Cawston's photographs. It's odd, really, since none were taken in the US; instead they feature scenes from Italy, Cuba, Mexico, Brazil - even Bristol. Yet, be it in the contrasting colours of a Havana pool, the perfect clapboards of an Avonmouth cottage, or the crooked hat of a Tibetan cowboy, Crawston's images recall both the New World melancholy of Edward Hopper and the dazzling modernity of David Hockney's Berkeley days.

Cuban prisoners released against their will

Two well-known Cuban dissidents were released from prison yesterday, despite the fact both men said they wanted to remain in jail until other opposition leaders were freed and other demands were met.

Guantanamo: Bin Laden's cook to be freed early

Osama Bin Laden's former cook and driver, who was convicted at a war crimes tribunal at Guantanamo, has had his prison sentence reduced from 14 years to two years by a Pentagon official.

The Autobiography of Fidel Castro, By Norberto Fuentes

Comandante under the microscope

Ernest Hemingway's Cuba: Raise a daiquiri to the old man and the island

So to Cuba then, at LAST, 45 years after I first got into Hemingway in Uganda after a teacher gave me his copy of For Whom the Bell Tolls. I was a melancholic teenager drawn to stories of extreme courage and stubborn idealism and weepy endings. My family life was wretched and crying over fiction provided relief. The author was in East Africa twice, in the Thirties and Fifties, when my uncle supplied him with guns. Mr Hemingway, said Uncle, had overcome near-death accidents and illnesses and was unafraid. Unafraid. I wanted to be unafraid, too. In the year he killed himself (1961), I read all his books. Some twice.

<i>The IoS</i> &ndash; read and admired by all the top people

It's official: The Independent on Sunday is a must-read among world leaders.

Travel 2011: Get more from your holiday

Already thinking about your next trip? Maximise the chances of a successful and rewarding year of travel by making 11 resolutions for 2011, says Simon Calder

Cuban medics in Haiti put the world to shame

Castro's doctors and nurses are the backbone of the fight against cholera

Leading article: Long time coming

Some people do not know when to shut up. At the end of the longest perjury trial in Scottish legal history, the defendant, Tommy Sheridan, decided to subject the Glasgow High Court jury to a five-hour closing defence speech that stretched over two days.

Album: The Creole Choir of Cuba, Tande-La (Real World)

The title of this album means, simply, "listen".

Robert Fisk: Stay out of trouble by not speaking to Western spies

Almost 30 years ago, a British diplomat asked me to lunch in Beirut.

Cuban dissident refused visa to collect prize

A Cuban dissident used a video address at yesterday's award of the EU's main human rights prize to call for the release of political prisoners in his homeland and for the government to end attacks on the opposition.

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

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