Arts and Entertainment Philip Vaughan has accused the Hayward gallery’s executives of going back on plans to restore his Neon Tower work, right

Gallery criticised over decision not to restore Neon Tower to London skyline

Landmarks: Tatlin's Monumnet

My choice of a landmark is perhaps an unusual one because although the design is one of the great symbols of modern artistic achievement, for some reason it has never been made into a permanent structure. Tatlin's Monument was designed to celebrate a key moment in the Russian Revolution, the Third International, and at that time artists from all disciplines were doing work that at one stroke overthrew everything that had gone beforehand. Tatlin's idea, developed between 1919 and 1920, was to make a 1,200ft tower in the form of two interlocking spirals that would wind up around an inclined mast. This would produce an enveloping structure inside which three solid objects were to contain the equivalent of the Houses of Parliament. Each of these solids would rotate at different speeds on a spindle. The whole idea of information was very important to the Russian people and the building was to have display screens issuing news, as well as a special projector that would throw words onto the clouds.

Contemporary Art Market: Exhibition highlights new wave of painting 'unbound' for success

A RESURGENCE of interest in painting is flagged by the new exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, 'Unbound', aimed at demonstrating that the old-fashioned procedure of painting pictures is not dead - as some critics claim - but busy bursting boundaries and becoming something else. Collectors are buying these 'new' paintings, oils particularly, with enthusiasm.

Arts: Salvador Dali, one in a million: Salvador Dali, subject of a major exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, is the most forged artist of all time. Prints by the master surrealist have long been viewed with distrust by dealers and auction houses, but only now has the enormous scale of the con been calculated. Dalya Alberge reports

Forgers have been doing a fantastic trade in prints by the master surrealist Salvador Dali for years. No other artist has been faked as much. Dali himself knew about the forgeries, and was rather flattered by them. At a time when art criticism was not particularly kind to an artist who is today regarded as a genius, Dali wryly said that 'someone who is subjected to forgery the way I am must really be fantastically good'.

ART REVIEW / Painting themselves into a corner: Confronted by the Roger Hilton retrospective at the Hayward and recent works by Fiona Rae at the ICA, Tom Lubbock wonders whether painterly abstraction adds up to all it's been cracked up to be

The Roger Hilton exhibition at the Hayward Gallery has been showing for two months now, but these pages have so far failed to give it a notice. Perhaps culpably. For, to many people - to judge from things published elsewhere - it seems obvious that Hilton is a major, though neglected, figure in post-war British painting. And to those same people, the Hayward is itself culpable in not giving Hilton, who died in 1975 aged 63, a major retrospective. His work occupies only one room in the gallery, with Julian Opie getting the rest (and he has been reviewed on these pages). So is there a problem here?

Art Market: Dealers' doubts fail to dent prices for Impressionism

CONSIDERING how unimpressed a number of leading dealers had been with the selection of Impressionist works to be offered at the London auction houses this week, Christie's pulled an impressive crowd last night. Those same dealers - usually so accurate in predicting how an auction will go - were to be surprised by 84 per cent of the works finding buyers. It was the highest percentage since 1989.

EXHIBITIONS / The years of living dangerously: Roger Hilton went to extremes, both of art and behaviour. A new show at the Hayward charts his progress. Plus, Julian Opie

ROGER HILTON treated art as an adventure, an attitude that helped to make him such a splendid exception among English painters. He set off with little baggage, taking nothing from his intermittent studies at the Slade. Then, in the Thirties, he spent time in Paris. By the time of his maturity Hilton's paintings were more reckless and radical than anything this country had seen before. This was in the early Fifties, when abstraction had few followers and many enemies. His best pictures still appear defiant of convention, though the Hayward Gallery's retrospective puts them in context and shows how they were influenced.

Urban imagery on a grand scale dominates British artist's first major exhibition

Julian Opie surveying his creation, Imagine you can order these '93, at the Hayward Gallery in London, which is staging the artist's first major exhibition. Opie's large-scale works focus on urban sites such as airports and shopping centres and unite painting and sculpture. The exhibition opens on Thursday.

ART / Lost in the Outback: Tom Lubbock on 'Aratjara: Art of the First Australians' at the Hayward Gallery

TOO many dots. Too many stripes. Too many concentric circles. And all those earth colours. The works now on display in the Hayward Gallery's group exhibition generally ask a little to go an awfully long way. Sometimes it comes off. Tim Leurah Tjapaltjari's picture Rock Wallaby Tjukurrpa (1982) is a significant success, because it achieves a complex and wonkily balanced composition, without falling into either formulaic repetition of motifs, or random accumulation - both unfortunate temptations to many of the artists here. Alec Mingelmanganu's Wandjina (1980), a Paul Klee-like Angel, gives a nice apparitional quality to the picture surface, avoiding the assertive combinations of black, white and red and yellow ochre, also much too prevalent. And among the sculptures, Wilfred Pilakui's Pukumani Burial Pole (1979) is a strong pile-up of Brancusi plinths.

GLOSSARY / Pleased to be below par? That's life for a golfer

FOR ITS more passionate fans golf is not just part of life, it is life by other means, a strange distillation1 by which the challenges you normally encounter over the course of years are fitted into a course of 18 holes. In 1924 Lloyd George observed that 'you get to know more of the character of a man in a round of golf than you can get to know in six months with only political experience' and the Israeli statesman Abba Eban once confessed that it had given him 'an understanding of the futility of human effort'.

Critical round-up: Georgia O'Keeffe - Hayward Gallery

'When we come to examine these paintings as painting, they reveal themselves as poor, thin stuff indeed . . . Clearly she believed in her own myth . . . The hard truth is that she was a weak draughtsman and at best an indifferent painter.' William Packer, Financial Times

ART MARKET / O'Keeffe goes missing

A painting by Georgia O'Keeffe, who seems to be America's most popular 20th-century artist at the moment, has gone missing, very possibly in Britain.

Letter: Museum pieces

PERHAPS 'Cries and Whispers' (Review, 25 April) should listen to fewer whispers of the Chinese variety and heed a few more facts. 'Jack Hughes' alleges that leading American museums have not contributed to the Georgia O'Keeffe exhibition at the Hayward Gallery.

Letter: A woman's vision the world

Sir: I must take up a cudgel to swipe at Andrew Graham-Dixon after reading his review of Georgia O'Keefe's show at the Hayward Gallery ('A legend in her own landscape', 13 April). If ever there was a male chauvinist view of artist endeavour, this is it.

The Sunday Preview: Art:

Georgia O'Keeffe (Hayward Gallery, 071-928 3144, Thurs to 27 June). A legend of American art, famous through six decades for her abstracted canvases of flowers, bones and skulls and for her collaboration with her photographer husband Alfred Stieglitz. Plus dramatic landscape photos and light installations by James Turrell.
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Is this the future of flying: battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks?

Is this the future of flying?

Battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks
Isis are barbarians – but the Caliphate is a dream at the heart of all Muslim traditions

Isis are barbarians

but the Caliphate is an ancient Muslim ideal
The Brink's-Mat curse strikes again: three tons of stolen gold that brought only grief

Curse of Brink's Mat strikes again

Death of John 'Goldfinger' Palmer the latest killing related to 1983 heist
Greece debt crisis: 'The ministers talk to us about miracles' – why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum

'The ministers talk to us about miracles'

Why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum
Call of the wild: How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate

Call of the wild

How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate
Greece debt crisis: What happened to democracy when it’s a case of 'Vote Yes or else'?

'The economic collapse has happened. What is at risk now is democracy...'

If it doesn’t work in Europe, how is it supposed to work in India or the Middle East, asks Robert Fisk
The science of swearing: What lies behind the use of four-letter words?

The science of swearing

What lies behind the use of four-letter words?
The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won't have him back

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won’t have him back
Africa on the menu: Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the continent

Africa on the menu

Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the hot new continent
Donna Karan is stepping down after 30 years - so who will fill the DKNY creator's boots?

Who will fill Donna Karan's boots?

The designer is stepping down as Chief Designer of DKNY after 30 years. Alexander Fury looks back at the career of 'America's Chanel'
10 best statement lightbulbs

10 best statement lightbulbs

Dare to bare with some out-of-the-ordinary illumination
Wimbledon 2015: Heather Watson - 'I had Serena's poster on my wall – now I'm playing her'

Heather Watson: 'I had Serena's poster on my wall – now I'm playing her'

Briton pumped up for dream meeting with world No 1
Wimbledon 2015: Nick Bollettieri - It's time for big John Isner to produce the goods to go with his thumping serve

Nick Bollettieri's Wimbledon Files

It's time for big John Isner to produce the goods to go with his thumping serve
Dustin Brown: Who is the tennis player who knocked Rafael Nadal out of Wimbeldon 2015?

Dustin Brown

Who is the German player that knocked Nadal out of Wimbeldon 2015?
Ashes 2015: Damien Martyn - 'England are fired up again, just like in 2005...'

Damien Martyn: 'England are fired up again, just like in 2005...'

Australian veteran of that Ashes series, believes the hosts' may become unstoppable if they win the first Test