Arts and Entertainment Philip Vaughan has accused the Hayward gallery’s executives of going back on plans to restore his Neon Tower work, right

Gallery criticised over decision not to restore Neon Tower to London skyline

Letter: Visual appeal of the Hayward Gallery

Sir: Following Jonathan Glancey's article on the Hayward Gallery ('Not so much a Sixties block, more a work of art', 24 February), I should like to add a sculptor's viewpoint to the argument against its demolition.

Architecture: Not so much a Sixties block, more a work of art: The Hayward Gallery should be glorified, not torn down like some unwanted relic, says Jonathan Glancey

THE Hayward Gallery, London's most controversial art venue (at least from an architectural point of view), is in the news again. Two years ago the South Bank Board announced it wanted to tear down the whole Sixties concrete arts complex and replace it with a commercially driven development in which new art galleries would be huddled between shops and lettable office space.

Hayward Gallery saved in 15m pounds plan

PLANS to demolish the Hayward Gallery on London's South Bank, widely regarded as a Sixties concrete eyesore, have been abandoned. In an extradordinary turn- round, following a confidential memo to the heads of the board responsible for managing the South Bank arts complex, the board is instead to demand that the Government spend up to pounds 15m 'as an immediate priority' to improve the complex.

Jannis Kounellis with one of his sculptures

Jannis Kounellis with one of his sculptures which incorporates a live macaw on a perch behind trays of cacti. It is part of the Gravity and Grace exhibition on the revolutionary changes in sculpture from 1965 to 1975 that opens at the Hayward Gallery in London next week. The show contains about 60 works by 20 artists.

EXHIBITION / Conference of strange deities: Andrew Graham-Dixon reviews 'The Art of Ancient Mexico' at the Hayward Gallery

The Hayward Gallery's 'The Art of Ancient Mexico' quickly establishes itself as one of the better hung exhibitions in London at the moment. Six fertility goddesses on tall plinths preside sternly over the opening gallery, which also includes a 3ft-long stone phallus from the Museo Nacional de Antropologia in Mexico City. This daunting object was discovered a century ago in the plaza of a small Mexican town called Yahualica, where it played its part in an archaic local custom said to have involved a lot of flowers and a complicated fertility dance.

SCULPTURE / Now figure it this way: Dalya Alberge reports on the rehabilitation of the once rubbished artefacts of Ancient Mexico . . . . . .and traces their influence on twentieth-century artists Henry Moore, Frida Kahlo and Peter Randall-Page

The scaly surface of an ancient Mexican sculpted figure of Xipe-Totec, a fertility god, is supposed to suggest the flayed skin of a sacrificial human victim. (A reminder, it seems, of the ceremonies in which priests honouring the gods wore the skins like capes until they tightened and burst in the sun.) Such gory facts tend to overwhelm any artistic considerations, but the figure is one of many included in a major exhibition on Ancient Mexican art - opening at the Hayward Gallery, London, on 17 September. Not surprisingly the organisers are playing down the civilisation's barbarism.

Pounds 2,000 award for 'black slaves' slur on five staff

FIVE catering staff sacked from London's prestigious South Bank arts centre after being referred to as 'black slaves' were each awarded pounds 2,000 yesterday.
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