News Tony Hsieh, founder of Zappos, where employees are famed for being happy

The online retailer Zappos is the largest company yet to adopt “holacracy”, a new business approach in which bosses are banished and workers choose their tasks. But who makes the tea?

Playing the Shape Game, By Anthony Browne with Joe Browne (Cape £25)

In this beautifully and generously illustrated, large-format combination of memoir, career retrospective and guide to illustration, the author, illustrator and current Children's Laureate, Anthony Browne, uses the "shape game" which he and his brother played as children – whereby one draws an abstract shape and the other transforms it into a recognisable object – as a metaphor for his entire career, and the creative process itself.

Alex Steinweiss: The Inventor of the Modern Album Cover, By Kevin Reagan

Inspired by a school art teacher, New Yorker Alex Steinweiss was 22 years old when he "stumbled" into a job designing promotional displays for the Columbia Broadcasting System's new record company.

Norman Rockwell's America, Dulwich Picture Gallery, London

An artist so lacking in message he makes apple pie and picket fences look loaded

In defence of Don Revie – a damn good manager

Fifty years after he took over at Leeds, his son and ex-players say it is time to put the record straight and restore a tainted reputation

Secret diary of a nomad searching for latest club

Rohan Ricketts' blog is a must-read as he plies his trade at far-flung outposts

Peter Reddick: Award-winning wood engraver who illustrated numerous books for the Folio Society and Penguin

Peter Reddick was an artist and illustrator who used the wood-engraving technique developed by Thomas Bewick and his successors from the end of the 18th-century onwards. He used the end grain of the wood (typically a very hard wood such as boxwood) to make his incision, whereas the traditional woodcut is made using the softer side-grain. The resulting image has the potential for great sharpness, depth, and intensity. Edward Hodnett in Five Centuries of English Book Illustration said of Reddick: "His success stems from the unusually conscientious effort he makes to clothe imaginary characters and places in the semblance of reality. He takes pains to particularise faces and make them interesting. Then he transforms the traditionalism of his approach by means of bravura wood engravings."

Fancy and imagination: Beardsley and the book illustrators

Flipping through a picture book is a magical pastime. But because some illustrations hold more power than others, it follows that some illustrators are greater magicians. One of the greatest is surely the late Aubrey Beardsley, whose black ink drawings conjure fantasy worlds and monsters.



The Selected Works of TS Spivet, by Reif Larsen

The Selected Works of TS Spivet is a joy; a colourful feast of a book. There have, perhaps, been better novels published this year (the narrative loses a little of its momentum towards the end), but few as bold or refreshing as Reif Larsen's debut.

Hokusai: An exceptional Japanese life in pictures

It's never too late to produce a masterpiece. The Japanese artist Hokusai (1760-1849), who is famous for his print The Great Wave Off Kanagawa, produced his most important works from the Mount Fuji series in his seventies.

The great paper caper

Origami has long been appreciated as an art form, but now folding fans are creating boats and even spacecraft, says Genevieve Roberts

René Gruau: Illustrating Dior

An exhibition of drawings by the fashion illustrator who realised Christian Dior’s designs in pen and ink opens at London’s Somerset House tomorrow.

The ad men go mad for merchandising

Can 'Mad Men' exploit its commercial potential and still retain its stylish integrity? Sarah Hughes looks at the latest spin-offs

A Fair Maiden, By Joyce Carol Oates

On a walk one afternoon, 16-year-old Katya Spivak, a nanny in the town of Bayhead Harbor, New Jersey, is approached by Henry Kidder, an elderly illustrator; he offers her money to pose for a series of portraits and she agrees, only vaguely aware of his more sinister intentions.

Les Gibbard, 1945-2010: Charming cartoonist with a razor-sharp nib

Les Gibbard, the cartoonist and illustrator who worked for The Independent on Sunday, died last week at the age of 64 after what should have been a routine knee-replacement operation. Peter Schrank, this paper's political cartoonist, for whom Gibbard would stand in on holiday duty, said: "His style was economical and understated. He wasn't savage, his cartoons were usually charming, which makes the point twice as effectively."

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University Edible Garden, Leeds – a sustainable garden in the centre of the university, passers-by can help themselves to the home-grown produce
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

Broadcasting plays and exhibitions to cinemas is a sure-fire box office smash
Shipping container hotels: Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Spending the night in a shipping container doesn't sound appealing, but these mobile crash pads are popping up at the summer's biggest events
Native American headdresses are not fashion accessories

Feather dust-up

A Canadian festival has banned Native American headwear. Haven't we been here before?
Boris Johnson's war on diesel

Boris Johnson's war on diesel

11m cars here run on diesel. It's seen as a greener alternative to unleaded petrol. So why is London's mayor on a crusade against the black pump?
The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

The air strikes were tragically real

The children were playing in the street with toy guns
Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

Britain as others see us

Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them altogether

Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them

Jonathon Porritt sounds the alarm
How did our legends really begin?

How did our legends really begin?

Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

Lambrusco is back on the menu

Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz
A new Russian revolution: Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc

A new Russian revolution

Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc
Eugene de Kock: Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

The debate rages in South Africa over whether Eugene de Kock should ever be released from jail