News Grammar campaigners in Cambridge have been adding apostrophes to street signs after Cambridge City Council stopped using them.

The Good Grammar leader warned that now apostrophes are gone, commas could be next

Today's wacky stories from the web: Hollywood sign face-lift, plane crash test and barmy bees

Hollywood sign face-lift, post election exodus, high court high, cooking on the eternal flame and one seriously rad dad

Who makes the best traveller: geographer, linguist or engineer?

So what is the ideal profession for a traveller? What mix of working skills translates best into the perfect blend for a life on the road?

A Trick I Learned from Dead Men, by Kitty Aldridge

Beneath a young undertaker's lyrical voice lies a lament for our loss of the land and its riches

Until Further Notice, I Am Alive, By Tom Lubbock

Why we must think before we speak

Mars has shrunk its bars, but what will it do with the Duo?

Giant snacks – meant for two, eaten by one

Andrew Martin chooses the smaller bar – and no sharing

Paris Sorbonne University is one of many on the Continent that charges lower fees than those in the UK

A broader scope for your studies

An increasing number of British students are turning to European institutions for a top quality education, without the huge debts

Stephen Foley: Internet advertisers are on the wrong track again

US Outlook: Internet advertisers still don't get it. The industry went to Washington this week and announced it would support putting a "do not track" button at the top of every web browser, its latest ruse to ward off privacy laws. But faster than the pics from the photo op could be uploaded to Twitter, it became clear the industry has a very different view of what "do not track" means than will anyone clicking on their button.

Dying languages to be preserved in talking dictionaries

Some of the thousands of endangered languages destined to soon become extinct because so few people are speaking them are being preserved in the form of digital "talking dictionaries", designed to conserve the sound of the disappearing words and their meanings.

Do you live in Wokingham? Get ready for a long life...

The affluent Berkshire town of Wokingham is perhaps the closest England has to a Swedish-like nirvana after figures reveal that its residents can expect to live long, healthy lives.

'Spurs spend just like us,' says Mancini

Harry Redknapp's wife, Sandra, whose husband has made her one of the most discussed spouses on the press conference circuit, was yesterday drawn into Roberto Mancini's acerbic response to the Tottenham Hotspur manager's repeated claims that Manchester City have bought their way to success in a way his club have not.

Exercising mind and body: Figure skating championship in Moscow, 2001

A Philosophy of Sport, By Steven Connor

To note that a particular coach has a philosophy of football is a staple of sports reporting. Suggesting something grander than a mere approach and less technocratic than a theory, a philosophy of sport hints at meanings beyond the winning and losing of games. Touchline philosophy it may be, but our sporting conversation is preoccupied with question of rightness and wrongness, of beauty and ugliness - the core concerns of ethics and aesthetics. For the Ancient Greeks, the relationship between sport and philosophy was obvious. The basis of a classical education was the alphabet plus swimming. The habits and discipline of preparing the mind and body were parallel and complementary. Plato, his name derived from platon or broad-shouldered, was an accomplished wrestler. Aristotle, an avid fan of the beauty of the pentathlete, taught at the Lyceum – itself a gymnasium.

15 October 2011: Luis Suarez clashes with Patrice Evra and allegedly racially abuses him

Liverpool's problem? Dalglish was left to walk alone

Manager had little support as he attempted to handle difficult case

From Elvish to Klingon: Exploring Invented Languages, By Michael Adams

For a man who has written a Buffy the Vampire Slayer lexicon, Michael Adams puts together a pretty academic volume. He and his fellow-contributors range from the Bible to Esperanto to alien-speak in computer games. JRR Tolkien invented more languages than most polyglots can speak, crafting several types of Elvish, not to mention dwarf-talk and Mordor-mumble. To him, inventing a language, and the history of the folk who would have spoken it, was an art form.

Katy Guest: 'Sorry' is glib. This apology means more

Without the S word, Minchin shows true intent

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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement