News Grammar campaigners in Cambridge have been adding apostrophes to street signs after Cambridge City Council stopped using them.

The Good Grammar leader warned that now apostrophes are gone, commas could be next

Last-ditch talks fail to stop government's resignation over Dutch-French dispute

King Albert II accepted the Belgium government's resignation yesterday after negotiations failed to resolve a long-simmering dispute between Dutch- and French-speaking politicians over a bilingual voting district in and around Brussels.

Tears of joy as champion conquers final frontier

On its grandest stage, the paragon of his sport had gradually become its paradox. But now, at long last, the jockey routinely saluted as the best in history will no longer hear quite so many whispers that he is not even the best of his own generation.

'Ambient' sausage rolls 'an error'

The Co-op said it was correcting an "error" which led to "ambient sausage rolls" going on sale after a group which campaigns against gobbledegook complained that the description took the linguistic biscuit.

Himglish & Femalese, By Jean Hannah Edelstein

It is a debate intellectual feminism has grappled with ever since Luce Irigaray argued that women spoke a different language from men, which emanated from their "lips" (of the labial variety).

Hurry Down Sunshine: A Father's Memoir of Love and Madness, By Michael Greenberg

What happens, wonders Michael Greenberg, when one's vitality grows so powerful that, instead of flourishing, one eats oneself alive? Greenberg believes that this happened to his 15-year-old daughter. In 1996, Sally Greenberg was diagnosed with manic depression and – after a spell of feverish insomniac nights writing sonnets – was hospitalised. Language, once a blessing, became her curse. She could no longer express herself coherently, her linguistic breakdown mirroring her psychological disintegration.

So, where does your name come from?

The creation of the largest database of its kind aims to unlock the derivation of 150,000 names

Claude Levi-Strauss: Intellectual considered the father of modern anthropology whose work inspired structuralism

Claude Lévi-Strauss was the most famous anthropologist of his generation, and one of the leading intellectuals in post-war France. His writings inspired a major intellectual movement, and at least two of his books have already become classics of French literature. He was largely responsible for the development of social anthropology in France.

Laureate to help storytelling live happily ever after

New role created to boost oral literary tradition

Txting: The gr8 db8, By David Crystal

The prolific populariser of linguistics David Crystal strikes again, this time with a readable and informative account of the phenomenon of texting. And what a phenomenon it is: a decade ago, texting was virtually unknown; by 2010 some 2.4 trillion texts will be sent globally.

Don't Sleep, There Are Snakes, By Daniel Everett

It is 6:30 on an August Saturday morning during the dry season of 1980. The sun is shining, and a breeze blowing up from the Maici River. Daniel Everett wakes up in his hut among the Piraha Indians of Brazil, and it is on this morning that he realises how differently the two cultures – European-based and Pirahas – see reality. For the next two decades he grapples with the nuances of these differences.

Deaf Sentence, By David Lodge

This tale of retired academic Desmond Bates, who is gradually going deaf, is full of the kind of minute detail about the condition that lets you know the author has had some experience of it: nobody could be quite so pernickety about the process of inserting a hearing aid unless they'd actually repeatedly had to do it themselves. As Lodge's character, a linguistic professor, points out, "deafness is comic as blindness is tragic", and there's little apparent sympathy for his plight, either from his wife or from his colleagues.

Philip Hensher: On a fast track to joined-up thinking

Jargon is how the professions like to distinguish themselves

Leading article: Tongue in cheek

Unesco’s language team has put its foot in its mouth by branding the Cornish language “extinct”. That has come as something of a surprise to the 300-odd Cornish people who can still speak it. They have unwittingly joined those classical scholars who insist on parlaying with each other in a “dead” language. Cornish speakers shouldn’t be upset though. Nothing makes linguistic experts so excited as the chance to say that a language is disappearing, or, better still, has been submerged beneath the tides of history for ever.

Embryo selection critics fear 'slippery slope'

At the heart of the controversy surrounding Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) is that age old ethical terror, the "slippery slope".

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US immigration: President Obama ready to press ahead with long-promised plan to overhaul 'broken system' - but will it get past a Republican-controlled Congress?

Immigration: Obama's final frontier

The President is ready to press ahead with the long-promised plan to overhaul America's 'broken system' - but will it get past a Republican-controlled Congress?
Bill Cosby rape allegations explained: Why are these allegations coming out now? Why didn’t these women come forward earlier? And why has nobody taken legal action?

Bill Cosby rape allegations explained

Why are these allegations coming out now? Why has nobody taken legal action? And what happens next for the man once thought of as 'America's Dad'
Four years of excruciating seizures caused by the 1cm tapeworm found burrowing through a man's brain

You know that headache you’ve got?

Four years of excruciating seizures caused by the 1cm tapeworm found burrowing through a man's brain
Travelling to work by scooter is faster than walking and less sweaty than cycling, so why aren’t we all doing it?

Scoot commute

Travelling to work by scooter is faster than walking and less sweaty than cycling, so why aren’t we all doing it?
Paul Robeson: The story of how an American icon was driven to death to be told in film

The Paul Robeson story

How an American icon was driven to death to be told in film
10 best satellite navigation systems

Never get lost again: 10 best satellite navigation systems

Keep your vehicle going in the right direction with a clever device
Paul Scholes column: England must learn to keep possession and dictate games before they are exposed by the likes of Germany and Brazil

Paul Scholes column

England must learn to keep possession and dictate games before they are exposed by the likes of Germany and Brazil
Michael Dawson: I’ll thank Spurs after we win says defender as he prepares to return with Hull

Michael Dawson: I’ll thank Spurs after we win

Hull defender faces his struggling former club on Sunday ready to show what they are missing. But he says he will always be grateful to Tottenham
Frank Warren column: Dr Wu has big plans for the professionals yet he should stick to the amateur game

Frank Warren column

Dr Wu has big plans for the professionals yet he should stick to the amateur game
Synagogue attack: Fear unites both sides of Jerusalem as minister warns restoring quiet could take 'months'

Terror unites Jerusalem after synagogue attack

Rising violence and increased police patrols have left residents of all faiths looking over their shoulders
Medecins sans Frontieres: The Ebola crisis has them in the headlines, but their work goes far beyond West Africa

'How do you carry on? You have to...'

The Ebola crisis has Medecins sans Frontieres in the headlines, but their work goes far beyond West Africa
Isis extends its deadly reach with suicide bombing in Kurdish capital

Isis extends its deadly reach with suicide bombing in Kurdish capital

Residents in what was Iraq’s safest city fear an increase in jihadist attacks, reports Patrick Cockburn
Underwater photography competition winners 2014 - in pictures

'Mysterious and inviting' shot of diver wins photography competition

Stunning image of cenote in Mexico takes top prize
Sir John Major: Negative West End portrayals of politicians put people off voting

Sir John Major hits out at theatres

Negative West End portrayals of politicians put people off voting
Kicking Barbie's butt: How the growth of 3D printing enabled me to make an army of custom-made figurines

Kicking Barbie's butt

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