Arts and Entertainment
 

Celia Paul is the least noisy portrait painter in oils imaginable. Her subjects - which usually tend to be relatives, close friends or herself - exist within a kind of religiose hush of rapt self-absorption.

Freud self-portrait sold for £2.8m

A self-portrait of Lucian Freud nursing a black eye after a punch-up with a taxi driver sold for more than £2.8 million when it went under the hammer.

Le Grand Macabre, Coliseum, London<br/>The Rake's Progress, Peacock Theatre, London

Sing to the hand, the face is decomposing: An accommodating giantess steals the show in this triumphant production of Ligeti's surrealist farce

Leading article: Art of destruction

One can easily sympathise with the bitterness felt by the widow of Henri Cartier-Bresson at the careless treatment of some of the works the pioneering photographer had entrusted to the French authorities. But the fact is that great works often have traumatic histories. The Parthenon was blown up in the 17th century when the Turks used it as a dynamite store. The handwritten manuscript of Thomas Carlyle's History of the French Revolution was thrown onto the fire by John Stuart Mill's maid. The Bayeux Tapestry was used to cover an ammunition wagon.

Friends take just a minute to recall Sir Clement Freud

His brother Lucian was noticeably absent, but Britain's artistic and literary elite turned out in force yesterday for the funeral of Sir Clement Freud, who died last week.

Sir Clement Freud: Sharp-witted and lugubrious broadcaster, politician, writer and member of the Freud dynasty

Although born in Germany, Sir Clement Freud came to be regarded as an essentially English character with an idiosyncratic gift for dry wit and a talent in many other spheres of life. In his multi-faceted career, he acquired the status of a minor national treasure as he progressed through roles which included celebrity cook, dog food advertiser, politician, broadcasting personality, author and raconteur. His unique persona included the incongruity of his looks, the rarity of his smiles and the counterpoints of his slow delivery and his devastatingly quick wit.

Philip Hensher: Why big isn't always beautiful

The Week In Culture

Tom Sutcliffe: The Titian that was no turn-on

The Week In Culture

Lucian Freud: Early Works 1940-1958, Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert, London

Early Freud has a ferocious intensity

Freud's intimate portrait of his friend Bacon sold for &#163;5.4m

A rarely seen oil portrait of the artist Francis Bacon, painted by his friend Lucian Freud, has been sold for £5.4m. The work, which offers an intimate glimpse into the collaborative friendship of two giants of post-war art, is one of only two oil portraits of Bacon painted by Freud and the last remaining: the second was stolen from an exhibition in Berlin in 1988.

Kate Moss: the muse

She has long been the supermodel of choice for fashion designers. But Marc Quinn is only the latest in an long line of contemporary artists who find inspiration in the icon who transcended Croydon. By Arifa Akbar

While Fleet Street's finest clamour for an interview, Ronnie Wood tells all to the 'FT'

The pink paper pips the red tops with its unlikely scoop on the Stone's latest exploits

The art of parklife by Tracey (and Charlie)

A sun-drenched dachshund called Charlie was one of the first to enjoy an exhibition of deckchairs unveiled in London's Hyde Park yesterday, each one dreamed up by artists and celebrities including Tracey Emin and Joanna Lumley.

Leading article: Big Lucian

In times of nerve-shredding economic uncertainty, there tend to be two types of investors who really splash the cash around: those who don't yet realise that the bubble has burst, and those who are confident they are buying something of lasting value.

Freud's 'Big Sue' expected to fetch &#163;18m at auction

A life-size painting by Lucian Freud which has never been seen publicly in Britain is expected to sell for up to £18m, making it the most expensive work by a living artist at auction.

Joan Eardley, National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh

Backstreet boys and Gorbals girls
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee