Arts and Entertainment Roddy Doyle and Roy Keane as 'The Commitments' author Doyle has signed a deal to work with Keane to write the footballer's autobiography

Roddy Doyle, author of "The Commitments", has signed a deal to work with Roy Keane on the controversial ex-footballer’s latest autobiography.

The Judges' verdict: `I work it out to be pounds 2.70 an hour'

PRESENT AND former judges of the Booker Prize agreed that reading the 120 or so titles required to compile a shortlist for the award was an experience they would never wish to repeat.

Winner attacks Booker for its `miserly' awards

BOOKER, THE food wholesaler that sponsors Britain's most famous literary prize, has damaged the prestige of the award by its "miserly" behaviour, a former winner of the prize said yesterday.

The bard of Barrytown: Profile: Roddy Doyle

Just after the publication of The Woman Who Walked Into Doors in 1996, Roddy Doyle was standing in a bookshop when he was approached by the proprietor. "Could you do me a favour?" he asked. Sure, said Doyle, thinking the man wanted a book signed. "Next time," said the man, "would you write a comedy? Booksellers prefer it."

Murdoch's brain used for research

THE BRAIN of Dame Iris Murdoch has been donated for research into Alzheimer's disease, according to the wishes of the Booker prize- winning author and philosopher. Dame Iris died aged 79 in February after suffering from the illness for four years.

The Books Interview: Barry Unsworth - Grey skies and blue seas

High ideals and happy toil led Barry Unsworth from a Durham pit village to Umbria's hills. By Charles Nicholl

Comment: Sex - the anti-social force that challenges all the rules

Natasha Walter's Notebook

Music to his ears

First the fatwa, now a rock star: Salman Rushdie, U2's latest lyricist, explains himself in this week's `Arena'

Books: A Week in Books - Posterity makes dunces of critics - and judges

ONE OF the unexpected joys of judging the Booker Prize (as I will this year) is to watch the media take all the decisions for you, long months in advance. Every cultural tipster that I run across now writes with vast assurance that this year's last-ditch battle will pit Salman Rushdie against Vikram Seth. A tabloid even topped its review of one of these with "The Booker Prize winner 1999". Maybe the house astrologer has to write the headlines too.

Books: A woman not much taken with adultery

Elisa Segrave comes to admire a plain tale of passion and its price

Widdecombe the novelist nets pounds 100,000

THE REHABILITATION of Ann Widdecombe, the Tory health spokesman once branded "Doris Karloff" by the tabloids, appeared complete last night when it was announced she had secured an advance of pounds 100,000 for her first two novels from Weidenfeld and Nicolson.

McEwan up for top prize

THE BOOKER PRIZE winner Ian McEwan has been shortlisted for the pounds 85,000 Impac literary award, the world's richest literary prize.

Roll up for Rushdie and Seth prize-fight

SALMAN RUSHDIE and Vikram Seth are to be pitched against each other in the contest for this year's Booker Prize, in a continuation of the literary world's passionate affair with the Anglo-Indian novel.

Books: Why it's never the one that everyone wants

The Russian Booker Prize causes as many arguments as its British counterpart. Helen Womack reports

Books: The ancient groper's tale

James Urquhart dives with pleasure into a gentle fishy parable

Cultural Comment: Nervous moments in the prize war

I observed this year's Booker Prize with more than usual interest, and not just because it broke my five-year run of correctly predicted winners (like seemingly everybody else at the dinner, I'd tipped Beryl Bainbridge). This year I'm a Whitbread judge, and although the shortlist is not announced until this Friday (on BBC2's Bookworm programme, 7.30pm), by the time I sat down to my mozzarella and sundried-tomato starter in the Guildhall on Tuesday night, I already knew the identity of the winner of the Whitbread Novel Award.
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence