Arts and Entertainment Roddy Doyle and Roy Keane as 'The Commitments' author Doyle has signed a deal to work with Keane to write the footballer's autobiography

Roddy Doyle, author of "The Commitments", has signed a deal to work with Roy Keane on the controversial ex-footballer’s latest autobiography.

Yesterday's Weather, By Anne Enright

In a reflective introduction, Anne Enright explains the genesis of this compelling collection. The Booker Prize-winning author has presented the stories, which were written over the past 19 years, in reverse chronological order, so that she can laugh at herself getting younger. "They are written by people I might have been but decided against," she muses. "They are the shed skins of the snake."

The White Tiger, By Aravind Adiga

The Man Booker winner's triumphant adaptation

Howard Jacobson: Harold Pinter didn't get my joke, and I didn't get him – until it was too late

I listened in rapture. An observer would have picked us for master and acolyte

Paperbacks: Divisadero, by Michael Ondaatje

Romantically-inclined fans of Ondaatje's 1992 Booker prize-winning novel The English Patient will find much to enjoy in his latest work – a novel that hums with longing and cicada-chirruping scenery.

Letters: Bonuses at Lehman's

Enormous bonuses for Lehman's fallen stars

First-timers beat Rushdie to Booker Prize shortlist

A shortlist of "page turners" was announced today for this year's Man Booker Prize For Fiction.

The write stuff: The V&A celebrates the Man Booker winners from the past 40 years

It is a work that is 40 years in the making. Now, some 300 of literary agent Peter Straus's 1,000-strong personal collection of Man Booker-winning and shortlisted first editions will be showcased at an exhibition at the V&A.

Thomas Sutcliffe: The longlist is all the Booker I ever want

I found myself wondering, the other day, whether it would make sense to have a Booker longlist if there was no such thing as a Booker winner. The point being that the longlist puts right so much of what's wrong with the finishing-line jamboree – the inherent nonsense of a literary knockout tournament; the strong sense, all too often, that committee-room politics have produced the winner, rather than overall merit. Everything that the prize is said to do for literature, the longlist does as well – by which I mean both "also" and "as creditably". Drawing attention to possibly overlooked titles? Tick. Generally arousing an interest in current writing? Tick. Redressing the parochialism of British letters? Tick.

Man Booker Prize: It's Barry Unsworth for me

Mirror, mirror on the wall, which is the fairest Booker book of all? Trying to judge literary excellence by committee means that the prize has sometimes fallen victim to compromise voting, tokenism, or the suspicion that a book suitsthe prize rather thandeserves it. It's hard to claim that the 41 prize-winning novels in the Booker's history represent the flower of English literature between 1969 and 2007.

Vince Welnick

Last Grateful Dead keyboardist

First beating-heart transplant gives hope for future patients

Surgeons have successfully kept a human heart alive and beating outside the body, in a medical advance that could extend life-saving heart transplants to scores more patients.

Sexy, druggy Tory story upsets 'old school'

Andrew Davies's TV adaptation of Booker Prize-winning novel about the Thatcher years ruffles feathers

The People's Act of Love by James Meek

All men have the keys to hell in their trousers

Read this to the end, or I'm a lesbian

All professions are plagued by scurrilous rumour and unkind gossip. From my own experience, I have found politicos to be manipulative and vicious, academics scheming and jealous, journalists sly and poisonous, but for sheer vitriol and downright bitchiness, it's hard to beat the literary crowd. Until I was appointed a Man Booker Prize judge last year, I had never quite appreciated how much poison could be crammed into one chalice. Just when I thought it was all over - the prize awarded and the blood mopped off the floor - a Guardian writer accused me of promoting my "good friend" Susanna Clarke's novel, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell. I felt I hadn't progressed beyond the time one of St Hugh's rugger boys accosted me in the college bar and said, "Everyone's saying you're a lesbian."

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