Arts and Entertainment
 

Swedish artist's drawings, collages and sculptures are wilfully naive but deceptively sophisticated

Well heeled: Manolo Blahnik and his left-hand woman

As his exclusive collection for Liberty arrives, Manolo Blahnik talks footwear, films and fabrics with his niece and 'left-hand woman' Kristina. Carola Long listened in

Cultural Life: William Turnbull, sculptor

Visual Arts: I went to Barry Flanagan's posthumous show at Waddington Galleries. I thought Barry was a very good artist although I prefer his work prior to the hares. I've also just been to the Henry Moore show at Tate Britain. I think Moore is a great artist but his work has never moved me in the same way as Giacometti or Brancusi. I saw the Turner and Richard Long show also at the Tate. The Turner was my favourite of the three. I thought the Long show was very interesting but not really my thing.

William Turnbull: Retrospectively beyond our time

An exhibition of the work of William Turnbull, 88, one of the most important living British artists, opens tomorrow at Waddington Galleries.

Boy George, Dome, Brighton<br/>Lou Reed, Southbank Centre, London

The Culture Club star can still entertain, but Lou Reed's attempt to show his metal falls flat

Howard Jacobson: Proof that free enterprise doesn't work is on the snowy streets of Washington

Individualism is a fine ideal; it&rsquo;s only a shame individuals suck

Eddie Redmayne: The darling of the Donmar is making tracks into Hollywood

Eddie Redmayne is, by common consent, one of the most exciting actors to hit both stage and screen since the auspicious advent of Mark Rylance some 30 years ago. Indeed, it was Rylance who gave Redmayne his first break, casting him as Viola to his own astonishing Olivia in the all-male Twelfth Night that the Globe performed at Middle Temple Inn in February 2002. This staging was designed to mark the 400th anniversary of the occasion when Shakespeare's men crossed the Thames to perform the self-same comedy for the lawyers.

Red, Donmar, London<br/>Darker Shores, Hampstead, London<br/>1984, BAC, London

The colour of blood, the colour of money

Sarah Sands: Life goes on, and even Radio 4 listeners catch up in the end

After the death of Humphrey Lyttelton in 2008, the panel show that he had chaired for nearly 40 years, I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue, temporarily ceased because no one could imagine it without him. Barry Cryer wrote that Lyttelton was "the hub of the show". Jeremy Hardy ruled himself out as a successor on the grounds that "Humph had big shoes to fill and I wouldn't do it".

First Night: Red, Donmar Warehouse, London

Dostoyevsky thought that if Christ were ever to return to Earth, we would crucify him all over again. Perhaps so, but it's a safe bet that, before we got round to that, hot fashion designers would be competing to recruit him as poster boy for some major new underwear campaign. High spirituality and low commerce are easy bedfellows these days. This was not the case, though in 1959, which is the date-line for Red, John Logan's new play set in the Manhattan studio of the great Abstract Expressionist artist, Mark Rothko.

Rothko: Art on stage

As a new play about Mark Rothko opens tonight in the West End, Paul Taylor looks at how great artists and their work can be vividly brought to life on stage

Hyman Bloom: Abstract expressionist pioneer who was eclipsed by Rothko and Pollock

By chance, two of the founding fathers of American abstract expressionism were born a few miles apart in Tsarist south Latvia in the pogrom-ridden years before the First World War. Both men were from Orthodox Jewish families, both fostered early ambitions to become rabbis, both were brought to the United States as children. There, however, similarities end. The older man, Mark Rothko, né Rothkowitz, was destined to number among the most famous names in 20th century American art, on a par with Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. The other, Hyman Bloom, né Melamed, had faded into artistic obscurity long before his death at the age of 96.

New kids on the Bloc: Poland's young artists arrive in the UK

Even as the dissembling greed of politicians becomes the latest theatre of the absurd in Britain, an exhibition of far greater socio-political depth is being mounted at the Sainsbury Centre in Norwich. The show brings together the work of the legendary artist-performer Tadeusz Kantor, who died in 1990, just after the fall of the Berlin Wall, and that of 16 of Poland's New Wave artists. This is the blue touchpaper for Polska! Year, a series of 200 Polish cultural events in the next 12 months, including shows at Tate Britain and the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow.

Days Like These: 'To like a work of art, you have to know something about it. This worries me'

It was Sarah's idea to go to the Rothko exhibition at Tate Modern in London. Without her, it would have been one of those innumerable cultural events that I hear about, mentally flag and then fail to attend. But Sarah is one of my oldest and dearest friends, and I hadn't seen her for ages, so if she fancied the Rothko, that was good enough for me. Besides, I've always liked Rothko, Barnett Newman... that lot. As a student, I had posters of their works on my wall, and here was an opportunity to see Rothko's paintings in their vast rawness.

Rothko's Red, By Sue Hubbard<br />The Silence Room, By Sean O'Brien

Tales of art, love and drink as poets turn to prose

Albert Irvin: a retrospective, Kings Place Gallery, London

A painter who lets the sun shine into the city
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Prague, Budapest and Vienna
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3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
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Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

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Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

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Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

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Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

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The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

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