Arts and Entertainment
 

Swedish artist's drawings, collages and sculptures are wilfully naive but deceptively sophisticated

Well heeled: Manolo Blahnik and his left-hand woman

As his exclusive collection for Liberty arrives, Manolo Blahnik talks footwear, films and fabrics with his niece and 'left-hand woman' Kristina. Carola Long listened in

Cultural Life: William Turnbull, sculptor

Visual Arts: I went to Barry Flanagan's posthumous show at Waddington Galleries. I thought Barry was a very good artist although I prefer his work prior to the hares. I've also just been to the Henry Moore show at Tate Britain. I think Moore is a great artist but his work has never moved me in the same way as Giacometti or Brancusi. I saw the Turner and Richard Long show also at the Tate. The Turner was my favourite of the three. I thought the Long show was very interesting but not really my thing.

William Turnbull: Retrospectively beyond our time

An exhibition of the work of William Turnbull, 88, one of the most important living British artists, opens tomorrow at Waddington Galleries.

Boy George, Dome, Brighton<br/>Lou Reed, Southbank Centre, London

The Culture Club star can still entertain, but Lou Reed's attempt to show his metal falls flat

Howard Jacobson: Proof that free enterprise doesn't work is on the snowy streets of Washington

Individualism is a fine ideal; it&rsquo;s only a shame individuals suck

Eddie Redmayne: The darling of the Donmar is making tracks into Hollywood

Eddie Redmayne is, by common consent, one of the most exciting actors to hit both stage and screen since the auspicious advent of Mark Rylance some 30 years ago. Indeed, it was Rylance who gave Redmayne his first break, casting him as Viola to his own astonishing Olivia in the all-male Twelfth Night that the Globe performed at Middle Temple Inn in February 2002. This staging was designed to mark the 400th anniversary of the occasion when Shakespeare's men crossed the Thames to perform the self-same comedy for the lawyers.

Red, Donmar, London<br/>Darker Shores, Hampstead, London<br/>1984, BAC, London

The colour of blood, the colour of money

Sarah Sands: Life goes on, and even Radio 4 listeners catch up in the end

After the death of Humphrey Lyttelton in 2008, the panel show that he had chaired for nearly 40 years, I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue, temporarily ceased because no one could imagine it without him. Barry Cryer wrote that Lyttelton was "the hub of the show". Jeremy Hardy ruled himself out as a successor on the grounds that "Humph had big shoes to fill and I wouldn't do it".

First Night: Red, Donmar Warehouse, London

Dostoyevsky thought that if Christ were ever to return to Earth, we would crucify him all over again. Perhaps so, but it's a safe bet that, before we got round to that, hot fashion designers would be competing to recruit him as poster boy for some major new underwear campaign. High spirituality and low commerce are easy bedfellows these days. This was not the case, though in 1959, which is the date-line for Red, John Logan's new play set in the Manhattan studio of the great Abstract Expressionist artist, Mark Rothko.

Rothko: Art on stage

As a new play about Mark Rothko opens tonight in the West End, Paul Taylor looks at how great artists and their work can be vividly brought to life on stage

Hyman Bloom: Abstract expressionist pioneer who was eclipsed by Rothko and Pollock

By chance, two of the founding fathers of American abstract expressionism were born a few miles apart in Tsarist south Latvia in the pogrom-ridden years before the First World War. Both men were from Orthodox Jewish families, both fostered early ambitions to become rabbis, both were brought to the United States as children. There, however, similarities end. The older man, Mark Rothko, né Rothkowitz, was destined to number among the most famous names in 20th century American art, on a par with Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. The other, Hyman Bloom, né Melamed, had faded into artistic obscurity long before his death at the age of 96.

New kids on the Bloc: Poland's young artists arrive in the UK

Even as the dissembling greed of politicians becomes the latest theatre of the absurd in Britain, an exhibition of far greater socio-political depth is being mounted at the Sainsbury Centre in Norwich. The show brings together the work of the legendary artist-performer Tadeusz Kantor, who died in 1990, just after the fall of the Berlin Wall, and that of 16 of Poland's New Wave artists. This is the blue touchpaper for Polska! Year, a series of 200 Polish cultural events in the next 12 months, including shows at Tate Britain and the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow.

Days Like These: 'To like a work of art, you have to know something about it. This worries me'

It was Sarah's idea to go to the Rothko exhibition at Tate Modern in London. Without her, it would have been one of those innumerable cultural events that I hear about, mentally flag and then fail to attend. But Sarah is one of my oldest and dearest friends, and I hadn't seen her for ages, so if she fancied the Rothko, that was good enough for me. Besides, I've always liked Rothko, Barnett Newman... that lot. As a student, I had posters of their works on my wall, and here was an opportunity to see Rothko's paintings in their vast rawness.

Rothko's Red, By Sue Hubbard<br />The Silence Room, By Sean O'Brien

Tales of art, love and drink as poets turn to prose

Albert Irvin: a retrospective, Kings Place Gallery, London

A painter who lets the sun shine into the city
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General Election 2015: ‘We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon’, says Ed Balls

'We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon'

In an exclusive interview, Ed Balls says he won't negotiate his first Budget with SNP MPs - even if Labour need their votes to secure its passage
VE Day 70th anniversary: How ordinary Britons celebrated the end of war in Europe

How ordinary Britons celebrated VE Day

Our perception of VE Day usually involves crowds of giddy Britons casting off the shackles of war with gay abandon. The truth was more nuanced
They came in with William Caxton's printing press, but typefaces still matter in the digital age

Typefaces still matter in the digital age

A new typeface once took years to create, now thousands are available at the click of a drop-down menu. So why do most of us still rely on the old classics, asks Meg Carter?
Discovery of 'missing link' between the two main life-forms on Earth could explain evolution of animals, say scientists

'Missing link' between Earth's two life-forms found

New microbial species tells us something about our dark past, say scientists
The Pan Am Experience is a 'flight' back to the 1970s that never takes off - at least, not literally

Pan Am Experience: A 'flight' back to the 70s

Tim Walker checks in and checks out a four-hour journey with a difference
Humans aren't alone in indulging in politics - it's everywhere in the animal world

Humans aren't alone in indulging in politics

Voting, mutual back-scratching, coups and charismatic leaders - it's everywhere in the animal world
Crisp sales are in decline - but this tasty trivia might tempt back the turncoats

Crisp sales are in decline

As a nation we're filling up on popcorn and pitta chips and forsaking their potato-based predecessors
Ronald McDonald the muse? Why Banksy, Ron English and Keith Coventry are lovin' Maccy D's

Ronald McDonald the muse

A new wave of artists is taking inspiration from the fast food chain
13 best picnic blankets

13 best picnic blankets

Dine al fresco without the grass stains and damp bottoms with something from our pick of picnic rugs
Barcelona 3 Bayern Munich 0 player ratings: Lionel Messi scores twice - but does he score highest in our ratings?

Barcelona vs Bayern Munich player ratings

Lionel Messi scores twice - but does he score highest in our ratings?
Martin Guptill: Explosive New Zealand batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

Explosive batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

Martin Guptill has smashed early runs for Derbyshire and tells Richard Edwards to expect more from the 'freakish' Brendon McCullum and his buoyant team during their tour of England
General Election 2015: Ed Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

He was meant to be Labour's biggest handicap - but has become almost an asset
General Election 2015: A guide to the smaller parties, from the the National Health Action Party to the Church of the Militant Elvis Party

On the margins

From Militant Elvis to Women's Equality: a guide to the underdogs standing in the election
Amr Darrag: Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister in exile still believes Egypt's military regime can be replaced with 'moderate' Islamic rule

'This is the battle of young Egypt for the future of our country'

Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister Amr Darrag still believes the opposition can rid Egypt of its military regime and replace it with 'moderate' Islamic rule, he tells Robert Fisk
Why patients must rely less on doctors: Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'

Why patients must rely less on doctors

Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'