Arts and Entertainment
 

Swedish artist's drawings, collages and sculptures are wilfully naive but deceptively sophisticated

Seeing but not believing: The photography of Susan Hiller

The auras, dreams and paranormal visions in Susan Hiller's photography make for a thrilling show that's pretty strange, says Tom Lubbock, if not exactly true

Bottom falls out of the art market as Manet and Rothko fail to sell

Auctioneers feel the chill as sluggish sales and lower prices signal end of a boom

How the Tate made a £1bn mistake over Rothko

When the artist offered 30 paintings to the Tate, trustees feared he would want them hung permanently, Arifa Akbar writes

Mark Rothko: Still hip to be square

Rothko's great, glowering late canvases deliver the emotional hit of a big ballad, says Tom Lubbock. But is there substance to these tragic riffs?

Leading article: Past masters

Paris is showing Picasso's work alongside the great masters who influenced him. Now the Tate is planning to do the same for Turner. Neither artist would be embarrassed by the comparisons. Indeed, both set themselves up to vie with their predecessors. Arrogance, no doubt. Yet it is precisely that self-confidence, that reach to compare oneself with the very best, that makes a great artist. And in that reach also lies respect. You cannot fully comprehend the work of one giant without understanding their relationship with the influences of the past.

Joseph Solman: Artist friend of Rothko and Pollock

It is apt that Joseph Solman should have died in his sleep, in his 100th year, in the Manhattan apartment where he spent half his life. In a career that spanned nearly eight decades, Solman had lived through social realism, Cubism, expressionism and the Neo-Ashcan School, had championed and then rejected abstraction. In the course of all this, he made friends with artists far more extreme than himself, and whose names are much better known: among them Jackson Pollock and Marcus Rothkowitz, also known as Mark Rothko. Where Pollock died in a drunken car smash and Rothko by his own hand, though, Solman survived: never in thrall to a gallery, always his own man, happy to live over a kosher deli on 10th Street and Second Avenue.

Off Duty: Houston

It used to be said that "a few days in Houston isn't a getaway, it's a sentence". Not any more...

Bacon vs Bacon: £50m sale puts artist firmly among the greats

Two Francis Bacon paintings will go under the hammer next month, with rival auction houses each hoping that they set a new record price for the artist. Already, insiders suggest one of the works could top the highest amount paid at auction for a post-war piece.

Art of making money: How does a dead fish sell for £12m and who's writing all the cheques?

By what alchemy does a dead fish sell for $12m? How can a discarded leather jacket be worth $690,000? And who's writing the cheques? Don Thompson spent a year trawling the murky waters of the contemporary art market to find out

Album: Robin Guthrie

Imperial, Bella Union

Visual Arts: Between heaven and a headache

Bridget Riley's early works seduce the eye, then repel it. Some are as painful to look at as the midday sun. By Richard Ingleby

Classical: Quiet man of the avant-garde

The American composer Morton Feldman had to subsidise his music by working in a dry-cleaners. Now, a dozen years after his death, his immense pieces, with their extraordinary tonal balances, are finding a wider audience - thanks to CD.

Art: Private View - Vasily Kandinsky Royal Academy, London W1

One of the side effects of Pollock at the Tate and the Rothko show which runs to the end of this week at the Musee d'Art Moderne in Paris is a sense of just how far the great American artists of the 1940s and 1950s were the product of what had gone before in Europe. Picasso and Miro in particular look like the giants of the mid-20th century, with Matisse not far behind.

Visual arts: Landscapes of nowhere

Like Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko abandoned figurative art. Unlike Pollock, he chose stillness over action.

Essay: You don't have to be suicidal to be an artist, and it doesn't help

Our culture likes to romanticise creativity and depression. But it shouldn't.
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