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Swedish artist's drawings, collages and sculptures are wilfully naive but deceptively sophisticated

POP: GIG HIGHLIGHTS

FUN LOVING CRIMINALS

As I was going down to St Ives

Artists ignore St Ives at their peril. You have to be well connected to hang on the walls of Cornwall's new Tate, which is pulling in visitors in their thousands.

Music: The softer sounds of the Seventies

EVERY YEAR since 1990, Simon Rattle has set himself the hard task of defining a decade of modern music in a handful of concerts. His Towards the Millennium series has now reached the 1970s, which was when he came into his own as a conductor. But his title for this new instalment is (I guess intentionally) enigmatic: "All That Glitters ..." Is it that the music of the 1970s exposed the false gold of its times? Or was the music of the 1970s false gold itself?

The nothing of mist and air

VISUAL ARTS Turner's Watercolour Explorations 1810-1842 Tate Gallery, London

CLASSICAL MUSIC American Independents SBC, London

The second stage of the "American Independents" festival was an eight-hour marathon last Saturday: an RFH foyer programme by the expert South Bank Gamelan Players, followed by three concerts all featuring London Sinfonietta musicians, plus an illuminating conversation between John Adams and Natalie Wheen.

Just a three-day wonder Driven to abstraction The Rothko incident

The American artist Mark Rothko spent a grand total of three days in St Ives during the August of 1959. And the Tate has a grand total of three of his paintings. So what's all the fuss about? By Iain Gale

EXHIBITIONS; Between war and peace

A new show in London highlights the class of '45, and includes unknown work by some of the greats of Abstract Expressionism

Obituary: Walter Landor

May I add to the obituary of Walter Landor [by Rodney McKnew, 23 June]? writes Hassel Smith.

Classical Music / THE BLUE CONCERT QEH / RFH2, London

Not so much a concert, more a rite of communion. "Blue" was as in Derek Jarman's final film, Blue, and the baleful pallid rectangle stared out from a screen like a passionless Rothko. A huddle of the faithful gathered in the darkened front half of the hall. Simon Fisher Turner began the faintest of drones at the keyboards as the other musicians stole on to the stage. John Quentin opened his book.

A little felt and lard would go a long way. So would a bit of cash

A new exhibition in Leigh on Sea (past the baker's, opposite the used car lot) investigates the life-giving power of art. Iain Gale struggles to detect a pulse

VISUAL ARTS / The finally inexplicable: John Hoyland's latest paintings are not being exhibited by any gallery, to the disappointment of the critic Bryan Robertson who believes them to be among his best. Here Robertson, the curator of two previous Hoyland shows, questions the artist about the new work and his development as an abstract painter since the 1950s

Bryan Robertson: I've always understood, maybe over-simplistically, that the great abstract art of this century came about by a process of working through reality or some aspect of the physical world - the nude, landscape, the interior or still life - in stages toward simplification, and then, like a sort of exorcism, a casting away of what Rothko called 'crutches', venturing into some form of abstraction without any obvious references to the physical world, but maybe with some distilled, remembered vestiges of its appearance - like Mondrian's sequence of trees. But you seem to have begun, back in the Fifties, straight off as a fully-fledged abstract painter.
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