Arts and Entertainment
 

Swedish artist's drawings, collages and sculptures are wilfully naive but deceptively sophisticated

POP: GIG HIGHLIGHTS

FUN LOVING CRIMINALS

As I was going down to St Ives

Artists ignore St Ives at their peril. You have to be well connected to hang on the walls of Cornwall's new Tate, which is pulling in visitors in their thousands.

Music: The softer sounds of the Seventies

EVERY YEAR since 1990, Simon Rattle has set himself the hard task of defining a decade of modern music in a handful of concerts. His Towards the Millennium series has now reached the 1970s, which was when he came into his own as a conductor. But his title for this new instalment is (I guess intentionally) enigmatic: "All That Glitters ..." Is it that the music of the 1970s exposed the false gold of its times? Or was the music of the 1970s false gold itself?

The nothing of mist and air

VISUAL ARTS Turner's Watercolour Explorations 1810-1842 Tate Gallery, London

CLASSICAL MUSIC American Independents SBC, London

The second stage of the "American Independents" festival was an eight-hour marathon last Saturday: an RFH foyer programme by the expert South Bank Gamelan Players, followed by three concerts all featuring London Sinfonietta musicians, plus an illuminating conversation between John Adams and Natalie Wheen.

Just a three-day wonder Driven to abstraction The Rothko incident

The American artist Mark Rothko spent a grand total of three days in St Ives during the August of 1959. And the Tate has a grand total of three of his paintings. So what's all the fuss about? By Iain Gale

EXHIBITIONS; Between war and peace

A new show in London highlights the class of '45, and includes unknown work by some of the greats of Abstract Expressionism

Obituary: Walter Landor

May I add to the obituary of Walter Landor [by Rodney McKnew, 23 June]? writes Hassel Smith.

Classical Music / THE BLUE CONCERT QEH / RFH2, London

Not so much a concert, more a rite of communion. "Blue" was as in Derek Jarman's final film, Blue, and the baleful pallid rectangle stared out from a screen like a passionless Rothko. A huddle of the faithful gathered in the darkened front half of the hall. Simon Fisher Turner began the faintest of drones at the keyboards as the other musicians stole on to the stage. John Quentin opened his book.

A little felt and lard would go a long way. So would a bit of cash

A new exhibition in Leigh on Sea (past the baker's, opposite the used car lot) investigates the life-giving power of art. Iain Gale struggles to detect a pulse

VISUAL ARTS / The finally inexplicable: John Hoyland's latest paintings are not being exhibited by any gallery, to the disappointment of the critic Bryan Robertson who believes them to be among his best. Here Robertson, the curator of two previous Hoyland shows, questions the artist about the new work and his development as an abstract painter since the 1950s

Bryan Robertson: I've always understood, maybe over-simplistically, that the great abstract art of this century came about by a process of working through reality or some aspect of the physical world - the nude, landscape, the interior or still life - in stages toward simplification, and then, like a sort of exorcism, a casting away of what Rothko called 'crutches', venturing into some form of abstraction without any obvious references to the physical world, but maybe with some distilled, remembered vestiges of its appearance - like Mondrian's sequence of trees. But you seem to have begun, back in the Fifties, straight off as a fully-fledged abstract painter.
News
A poster by Durham Constabulary
news
Arts and Entertainment
books New York Times slammed over summer reading list
Sport
Cameron Jerome
footballCanaries beat Boro to gain promotion to the Premier League
Arts and Entertainment
Performers drink tea at the Glastonbury festival in 2010
music
Life and Style
Steve Shaw shows Kate how to get wet behind the ears and how to align her neck
healthSteven Shaw - the 'Buddha of Breaststroke' - applies Alexander Technique to the watery sport
Life and Style
tech
Sport
Standing room only: the terraces at Villa Park in 1935
football
Sport
Ben Stokes celebrates with his team mates after bowling Brendon McCullum
sportEngland vs New Zealand report
News
Amal Clooney has joined the legal team defending 'The Hooden Men'
people
News
news
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine