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My Week Gresham College professor Doug McWilliams, whose day job is running the Centre for Economic and Business Research, has a habit in his lectures of dropping in factual nuggets that send a shiver down your spine, And as the theme of the series is how the world has to change under the impact of the biggest-ever economic shock – the rapid rise of Asia – he has lots of material.

OBITUARY: Ralph Merrifield

Ralph Merrifield, archaeologist and museum curator: born Brighton 22 August 1913; married 1951 Lysbeth Webb (one son, one daughter); died London 9 January 1995.

Diary: 19-25 September

Tuesday 20: 'Witnesses and Dreamers' exhibition opens, Museum of London, London EC2.

Curator's Choice: Museum of London

My curator's choice is a Palaeolithic hand axe (above) found in Glasshouse St, by Piccadilly Circus, London WC2. It is between 400,000 and 70,000 years old and was discovered in about 1913 during building works in the area. The reason I like it is that it fits fantastically well into the hand and, when holding it, you have an instant sympathy with the person who used it.

The City learns to build on its past: Lynn Eaton discovers how ingenious engineering is preserving a valuable archaeological site

The latest technology is being used in the heart of London to build a modern art gallery and office block over the remains of a 2,000-year-old Roman amphitheatre.

Centrefold: Carry on Monopolising: The Museum of London's eccentric summer collection

'Carry On Collecting at the Museum Of London proves, if nothing else, that we are a nation of eccentrics. The exhibition shows hundreds of obscure objects of desire that people have made it their purpose in life to collect: sticking-plasters, knitting patterns, passport photos, hair combs, police badges, chewing-gum wrappers and milk bottles.

ARCHAEOLOGY / An early crossing of the Channel: A Bronze Age boat was excavated from a Dover street two years ago. David Keys reports on developments

THE world's oldest well-preserved seagoing boat - a preservation fund for which was launched earlier this month - is currently being examined by a team of archaeologists and scientists.

Obituary: Donald Harden

Donald Benjamin Harden, archaeologist, museum curator: born Dublin 8 July 1901; Assistant Keeper and Keeper, Department of Antiquities, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford 1929-56; Director, London Museum 1956-65; Acting Director, Museum of London 1965-70; married 1934 Cecil Harriss (died 1963; one daughter), 1965 Dorothy McDonald; died 13 April 1994.

Letter: Plan for a Museum of Type

IN THE next two months Britain has its last chance to establish the Type Museum, a unique working museum in London devoted to printing with moveable type. The Merrion Monotype Trust, with the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Science Museum, has rescued an irreplaceable wealth of letter patterns and precision machines. These - some eight million artefacts - represent Monotype, the hot-metal process patented in 1897 that perfected the art of automatic typesetting and produced typefaces for virtually every known alphabet and script. Printers worldwide came to Monotype for their supplies. The elegance of Monotype type design and technology made possible the unsurpassed quality of 20th- century print.

The villages of Kent have more to lament than the Channel rail link

KIT'S COTY House is a tomb. Several gigantic stone slabs, some upright and some laid across them as a roof, are all that remains of a Neolithic burial chamber. A few hundred yards down the slope of the North Downs is Little Kit's Coty, a jumble of fallen 10-ton blocks and slabs which once formed another chieftain's grave.

Museum may house legacy of protein 'philosopher'

STANLEY OWEN-GREEN, better known as the 'Protein Man' of Oxford Street, died last month, writes Joy Persaud.

BOOK REVIEW / Now the reindeer have moved on: The Peopling of London - ed Nick Merriman: Museum of London, pounds 9.95

IT WAS a savage place originally, full of swamps and forests. The best thing about it were the herds of reindeer and wild horses that passed through and could be ambushed and slaughtered on the spot. London (or its site) showed few signs of promise until the Romans saw its potential and built a city.

Architecture: New golden age at the Savoy Theatre

When the Savoy Theatre, London, was rebuilt in 1929 in a sensational Art Deco style, it drew some of the classiest theatrical acts, some of the smartest audiences and some of the greatest set designers, dancers, playwrights, composers and conductors of the age. The Great Crash notwithstanding, the Savoy frolicked on, offering its public an escape from depression, marrying the decorative style of Hollywood to the starkness of the European avant-garde. William Walton composed for the Savoy, Thomas Beecham conducted, McKnight Kauffer designed, Lotte Lenya sang and Tilly Losch danced. In between, the D'Oyly Carte company packed the house with perennial revivals of Gilbert and Sullivan.

Excavation reveals ancient site of slaughter: David Keys reports on gruesome discoveries under a Roman arena used for blood sports

The gruesome remains of prisoners slaughtered almost 2,000 years ago in the Roman Britain equivalent of the Colosseum have been discovered by archaeologists in central London.

Obituary: Grace Golden

Grace Golden, painter and illustrator: born London 1904; died London 3 June 1993.

Obituary: Cardew Robinson

Douglas ('Cardew') Robinson, born Goodmayes Essex 14 August 1917, died London 27 December 1992.
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