Spiderman tames a two-horned monster

Tom Foulds used to be an engineer. Then he discovered his true love - creepy-crawlies. Colin Blackstock reports

It's on television where the wild things are

If it's furry, you'll find it on your television screen, as production companies cash in on the pulling power of wild creatures. But as the scramble intensifies to provide such programming, what happens to quality? asks Paul McCann

Box Clever: Natural born thrillers

The BBC's Natural History Unit is in the mood for celebration. Not only is it 40 years young; it also stands alone in having avoided the Birtist axe. Sir David Attenborough, now 71, is the man most closely associated with the unit's success

Galapagos, 20 minutes from Wales

Nerys Lloyd-Pierce visits the tiny island nature reserve of Skokholm - home to dolphins, seals, and birds in their teeming, screaming thousands

Sex and drugs and natural history

I was reading a piece by Belinda Archer in this paper the other day about TV cookery programmes - I don't really get much chance to see TV cookery programmes, but I like to read any piece about TV cookery programmes that I can lay my hands on - and it seems that there are now more TV cookery programmes a day than there are meals. Some people, it seems, actually eat their take-away meals while watching TV cookery programmes, which I suppose is a bit like watching sex films while ....

A BBC butterfly flutters by, telling lies

All will not be what it seems when the BBC screens its new television wildlife series, Incredible Journeys, portraying the astonishing migratory voyages of creatures around the world, in January.

BBC to correct pledges paper

The BBC conceded yesterday that its "Statement of Promises to Viewers and Listeners" needed to be corrected to remove suggestions that its main broadcasting rivals did not offer a full range of programme genres in peak time.

Letter: BBC viewing data clarified

BBC viewing data clarified

Ugly truth of the born-again burbot

Imagine a fish with the beauty of Peggy Mount on a bad hair day. It is vaguely eel-like (hence its nickname of eel pout), with the dull colouration of a worn 1950s sofa (any colour you like as long as it's brown). Catching one must have all the excitement of tying your shoelace. And now some mad scientist wants to reintroduce the burbot to Britain.

Obituary: Susan Cowdy

Susan Cowdy was a well-known figure in the conservation of the natural history of her native Buckinghamshire, and at a national level through her work with the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), the Bardsey Island Trust and other bodies.

LETTERS: Charges do not deter museum visitors

Sir: I wish Charles Saumaraz Smith well in taking the National Portrait Gallery's bid to the Heritage Lottery Find for its new extension (report, 25 June), but I cannot let his comments on visitor numbers to museums go unchallenged.

With Buster the hermit crab

USA: HIGH TIDE IN TUSCON by Barbara Kingsolver, Faber pounds 9.99

Letter: Naturalists do care about small snails

Sir: I take issue with Nicholas Schoon's suggestion (15 May) that none beyond a few dozen specialists in museums and university biology departments really cares about the hundreds of small utterly obscure plant and animal species in Britain that are declining or endangered.

SCIENCE BOOKS: A hive of activity

DINOSAUR IN A HAYSTACK: Reflections in Natural History by Stephen Jay Gould, Cape pounds 18.99
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