Voices

The conclusion that women use sex as a bargaining tool is wildly outdated

Green papaya salad with red-chilli nahm jim

Sharp, hot, sweet and salty, this salad is extremely refreshing. Serve with grilled fish or warm rice laced with coconut cream.

Stay the night: The Park Hotel, Kerala, India

Sarah Barrell discovers high style at the latest hotel to grace the shores of Lake Vembanad

Around the world in 80 dishes: Thailand and Denmark

THAILAND: Rice noodles with pork and black bean sauce by Vatcharin Bhumichitr

Breakfast goes global: How to start the day the international way

At lunch and dinner, we've embraced world cuisine. So why are our mornings stuck in a toast-and-cereal rut?

Gorillaz: Monkey business

What's it like living on a desert island? And, does Snoop Dogg party harder than you? On the eve of their new album, The Independent quizzes Gorillaz bass player Murdoc

A Woman, A Gun and a Noodle Shop, Film Festival, Berlin

Coens remade in finest China

The story of pho: Vietnamese cuisine gets a stylish makeover

Its aromatic noodles and rolls are reborn as the perfect metropolitan fast food

Cahal Milmo: Has the Tulip Revolution wilted?

Kyrgyzstan Notebook

John Mayer, Hammersmith Apollo, London

Solo king hits traditional high

Loans still delayed, pot noodle saves the day

Thousands of UK students have still to receive their loans from the Student Loans Company (SLC), even though they are more than a month into term. Latest figures show that 109,000 students, with approved application forms, have still not seen any of the money they are due. Of these, 31,000 loan applications are still being processed, 39,000 are waiting for further information from students and 39,000 have only received basic funding, as their applications have only had a provisional assessment. With the increase of financial hardship during the recession, spurring an increase in applications, should the SLC not have expected a greater number of student loan requests?

Indonesia: False hope from voice in rubble

Rescuers rushed back into the rubble today after a woman's cries for help were reported coming from a collapsed hotel six days after Indonesia's devastating earthquake - but the search proved in vain.

Andrew Buncombe: Munching on tarantulas

One of the great things about Asia is the food - the variety, the freshness and the bewildering styles of cooking. Nowhere is this more true than in south-east Asia, a region of the world where I'm never happier than when sitting down over a simple bowl of noodles. I am having a lot of fun, therefore, reading the highly entertaining story of Ian Walker journey upstream along the mighty Mekong river.

My Week: Mark Graham

A Druid prepares for tomorrow's summer solstice
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine