Terence Blacker: 'Liberals' at their most cowardly

Censorship in 2011 involves shifting the blame on to others

Thomas Struth: Photographs 1978&ndash;2010, Whitechapel Gallery, London<br/>Vivian Maier: A Life Uncovered, German Gymnasium, London

Where have Thomas Struth's 4m-tall, gargantuan-format series been hiding all these years?

The gilded generation: What is it like to grow up as part of Russia's new power elite?

Russia now has more billionaires than anywhere else on earth

Meadows hopes to flower in London

The 800m runner from Wigan sees the World Championships as a step on the road to an Olympic medal

Skateboards: Hirst on wheels... yours for £1,200

Artist taps into the cool designer skateboard market, but the exorbitant prices he is charging have infuriated aficionados.

Trevor Frankland: Painter who valued controlled passion and mathematical clarity but was also drawn to the arcane and esoteric

The artist Trevor Frankland was, first and foremost, an intellectual; there was a concept or scheme behind all his work.

Susan Collier: Award-winning textile designer best known for her work for Liberty and Habitat

Swathed from head to calf-length hem in the gorgeous stuffs she designed herself, Susan Collier was unmissable. You noticed her gaudy turban before taking in her full skirt, noted that you had seen some of these textiles in the window of Liberty, and were captivated by the smoky voice and laughter of their wearer and maker. These materials were familiar because they were classics of textile design, and you – or someone you knew – very likely owned a set of Collier Campbell sheets, or curtains, or a scarf, if not an Yves Saint Laurent, Bill Gibb or Jean Muir frock in cloth made by the partnership of Susan and her sister Sarah Campbell. Their fabrics were everywhere, from the catwalk to Marks & Spencer's best-selling duvet cover. The firm is 50 years old this year, and the pity is that Susan died of cancer just before a Collier Campbell retrospective exhibition opened at the National Theatre (it runs until 10 July), showcasing some of the best known prints of the second half of the 20th century.

Thatcher handbag sold for £25,000 at charity auction

A handbag belonging to Margaret Thatcher fetched £25,000 when it went under the hammer, auctioned by Lord Archer.

The girl in the painting

The legal furore surrounding this watercolour has fascinated BBC viewers, but the story of the family it portrays is even more gripping, says Patrick Cockburn, grandson of the sitter

Julia Peyton-Jones: 'I feel impoverished. We are adrift from nature'

Julia Peyton-Jones commissioned the Serpentine Gallery's first summer pavilion in 2000. After a decade of extraordinary success, she tells Rob Sharp what the project means now

Street Fight in Naples: A City's Unseen History, By Peter Robb

Neapolitan, and not easily forgotten

Ren&#233; Magritte: The Pleasure Principle, Tate Liverpool, Liverpool

Surrealists loved a joke, but this A-to-Z format takes all the fun out of the Belgian artist and just makes him look arch

War at Picasso museum as artist's relative calls for curator's head

The art world of Spain is getting hot under the collar about the politics of Picasso. The Malaga-born artist's wealthy daughter-in-law, Christine Ruiz-Picasso, has refused to open the latest show at the Malaga Picasso Museum, and has demanded the resignation of its highly acclaimed director José Lebrero, who has curated a series of much-praised temporary exhibitions alongside the permanent show of Picasso paintings.

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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
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Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
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Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
Jeremy Clarkson 'does not see a problem' with his racist language on Top Gear, says BBC

Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

Nick Clegg the movie

Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?

Waxing lyrical

Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

Revealed (to the minute)

The precise time when impressionism was born
From slow-roasted to sugar-cured: how to make the most of the British tomato season

Make the most of British tomatoes

The British crop is at its tastiest and most abundant. Sudi Pigott shares her favourite recipes
10 best men's skincare products

Face it: 10 best men's skincare products

Oscar Quine cleanses, tones and moisturises to find skin-savers blokes will be proud to display on the bathroom shelf
Malky Mackay allegations: Malky Mackay, Iain Moody and another grim day for English football

Mackay, Moody and another grim day for English football

The latest shocking claims do nothing to dispel the image that some in the game on these shores exist in a time warp, laments Sam Wallace
La Liga analysis: Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Pete Jenson starts his preview of the Spanish season, which begins on Saturday, by explaining how Fifa’s transfer ban will affect the Catalans
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape