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David Cameron and William Hague got into similar trouble, but for exactly opposite reasons. If the Foreign Secretary had said “stupid person” or (admittedly a bit of a mouthful for an impromptu sedentary aside) “stupid Honourable Member”, he’d be home free. As the lip reading consensus was that he muttered “stupid woman” while Cameron was answering, or more accurately not answering, a hostile question from Labour’s Cathy Jamieson, he quickly became Twitter villain of the day.

Telstar, Nick Moran, 119 mins, (15)

Starring Con O'Neill, Pam Ferris, Kevin Spacey, James Corden

Phil Spector: the bald truth revealed

A prison mug shot of legendary music producer Phil Spector shows the man beneath the wigs.

If Spector's story is a tragedy, what about the woman he killed?

His trials masked the career of the fated actress more famous in death than in life

Phil Spector gets 19 years to life for murder

Music producer's defence team claim verdict 'based on conjecture, not facts'

New York Dolls, 100 Club, London

As befits a gig that sold out in four minutes, featuring one of the most important rock'n'roll bands of all time at one of London's most historically important small music venues, tonight's crowd are suitably ostentatious in their devotion to the New York Dolls.

Fashion: Stars earn their stripes

"Who needs a stylist?" peripheral Royal Zara Phillips asked in an interview recently. There's only one answer to that, Zara. But her younger cousin Princess Eugenie has been more successful in the sartorial stakes, and regularly steps out in Issa and Luella Bartley. She was snapped frolicking in Thailand last week in an itsy-bitsy, teeny-queeny, stars'n'stripes bikini – blissfully unaware of the coup going on in Bangkok, no doubt, and making some political statements of her own. One can only presume that not since George III's anger at losing the colonies has the American flag been so close to a member of the British monarchy's rear quarters.

Joe Meek and Telstar's tragic tale

Joe Meek was Britain's Phil Spector, and now his tormented life will be told on film

Spector: The untouchable – until it was too late

Phil Spector's willingness to brandish guns was an open secret decades before he killed Lana Clarkson. But the music business continued to indulge him. The industry has blood on its hands, argues Andy Gill

Spector trial hears of 'Russian roulette' with women

Record producer's defence team says actress committed suicide</p><p>

Tina Turner, O2, London<br>Imelda May, Koko, London

Fans were treated to all the hits belted out in style, while across town rockabilly got a modern twist

Estelle Bennett: Singer with the Ronettes

One of the most striking images of the early 1960s is of the Ronettes, two sisters – Ronnie and Estelle Bennett – and their cousin, Nadra Talley, exceptionally pretty with huge beehives and slim figures with tight-fitting dresses that split up right up their legs. Very different from the demure innocence of other girl groups, they sang the most sexually alluring songs of their generation. The Ronettes were supreme examples of Phil Spector's Wall Of Sound and Brian Wilson has described "Be My Baby" as the best pop record of all time.

Album: Glasvegas, A Snowflake Fall (and It Felt Like a Kiss), (Sony)

There's a pleasing arrogance to Glasvegas, and it manifests itself in their decision to end their first full year as an overground band with a Christmas album.

Phil Spector in rare interview

Phil Spector was one of America's most prolific and enigmatic music producers – an impresario responsible for creating the most iconic songs of the Sixties and Seventies for the Beatles, Beach Boys and Tina Turner.

Jerry Cole: Surf guitarist

In the 1960s, Jerry Cole was one of America's most prolific guitarists, turning his hand to surf music, rock, country, jazz and blues and playing on sessions for Brian Wilson and Phil Spector. He would replace less proficient group members at recordings, making the acts sound better than they were.

Larry Levine: Gold Star recording engineer who played a crucial role in the building of Phil Spector's 'Wall of Sound'

The recording engineer is the producer's right-hand man, there to help capture a performance from the musicians and singers and mix all the elements into a coherent, cohesive whole, and it was in this crucial role that Larry Levine helped the legendary Phil Spector build his "Wall of Sound" in the Sixties.

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