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One of that select band of British pianists to achieve international recognition, Bernard Roberts was in constant demand as a recitalist, chamber musician, accompanist, concerto soloist and teacher. He was acclaimed by audiences and critics, the remarkable breadth of his industry bringing greater recognition for the instrument itself and proving pivotal in inspiring generations of aspiring performers.

Google Doodle celebrates influential composer Claude Debussy with Clair de lune sequence

The works of Achille-Claude Debussy were considered a seminal force in the classical music of the 20th Century

Valery Gergiev is silent on his native Russia’s new law on homosexuality

Classical review: Prom 41 - One man, two conductors – a musical comedy

Russian maestro Valery Gergiev performs erratically, but empty seats are the evening’s real surprise

Album review: Justin Currie, Lower Reaches (Endless Shipwreck/Ignition)

Justin Currie is one of the more engaging personages in pop – his website is, hands down, the quirkiest and most articulate of any celebrity – which makes his continuing fidelity to fairly routine American musical modes somewhat frustrating.

Julia Holter: 'My mom can't play trumpet but I'd want her on it'

Fantasy band: Julia Holter

'My mom can't play trumpet but I'd want her on it'

Album review: Laura Veirs, Warp and Weft (Bella Union)

Laura weaves her magic with painful and poignant tales

Clement on stage in Nashville earlier this year

Jack Clement: Nashville legend who worked with Johnny Cash, U2 and Jerry Lee Lewis

"Cowboy" Jack Clement was one of the renaissance men of American music. A maverick original, his 60-year career was spent mainly within the country genre – writing and publishing hit songs, producing seminal albums (many in his own studios), recording in his own right, working as a DJ in his later years and even producing a horror film which has gained a cult following.

Edinburgh International Festival Opening concert

Edinburgh 2013: Official Festival Opening concert, ALexander Nevsky, Valery Gergiev

What a thrilling start to Jonathan Mills' penultimate International festival: the RSNO in excoriating form, the Festival Chorus, with beefed-up bass section, singing in stirring Russian and clearly-enunciated Latin, all with puppetmaster Valery Gergiev pulling their strings.

Bell X1, Chop Chop (Belly Up Records)

What's surprising about this Dublin band's sixth album is that they've created a wholly original sound without resorting to samples or other electronic gadgetry.

Album review: Peter Maxwell Davies, Piano Works 1949-2009 (Prima Facie)

Though best known for his large-scale works, this anthology suggests that in his own way, Peter Maxwell Davies may be as distinctive a piano miniaturist as Erik Satie. His Orkney home is clearly the biggest influence in this regard: works such as “Three Sanday Places”, “Snow Cloud, over Lochan”, “Yesnaby Ground” and the popular “Farewell to Stromness” are simple but deeply satisfying evocations of place, weather and character. Elsewhere, “Six Secret Songs” and “Five Little Pieces for Piano” are sketches of Borgesian brevity, some condensing impressive development into a tiny frame, while others have the impromptu manner of cartoons. Considerably more complex is the engrossing seven-part “Piano Sonata”.

Album review: William Sweeney, Tree O' Licht (Delphian)

The cello is key to the music of William Sweeney, something that becomes luminously apparent in these works showcasing the skills of Robert Irvine, either solo or partnered by pianist Fali Pavri or second cellist Erkki Lahesmaa. Inspired by Gaelic psalm-singing, the title track features the two cellists' lines intertwining like a double helix: the effect resembles a lower-register "Lark Ascending", until a pungent dischord appears, prompting more disparate progressions. "Sonata for Cello and Piano" offers an intriguing combination of exploration and introspection. But "The Poet Tells of His Fame" is the standout performance, Irvine playing over pre-recorded cello samples treated to give a series of tonal washes, whines and textures.

Violinist Nigel Kennedy performs The Four Seasons by Vivaldi

Classical review: Proms 33 and 34: Nigel Kennedy Orientalises Vivaldi and Mitsuko Uchida casts spells with Beethoven

Prom 33 – Uchida, Bavarian RSO, Jansons

Prom 34 – Kennedy, Palestine Strings, Orchestra of Life

Birmingham Conservatoire

History: Began life in 1859 as a department of the Birmingham and Midland Institute and was formally constituted as the Birmingham School of Music in 1886. The School became a part of the former Birmingham Polytechnic in 1971 whilst retaining conservatoire status, and remains part of Birmingham City University to the present day. 1989 saw the formal inauguration of the School under the name of Birmingham Conservatoire.

'Megaphone Man' Danny Shine is fighting the charge of 'causing annoyance'

Silenced - the man who spoke out too loudly: Danny Shine’s megaphone voice has been branded an ‘annoyance’ – but is it illegal?

When performance artist Danny Shine decided to address shoppers in London’s Oxford Circus on the follies of consumerism with the aid of a megaphone, he saw it as a public service. Unfortunately for him, a passing Westminster City Council street warden begged to differ.

The father of Cuban ballet: Alonso with Loipa Araujo

Fernando Alonso: Dancer, teacher and co-founder of the Cuban National Ballet

Arich dance legacy was assured in Cuba many years ago by the three mythical figures who founded the Cuban National Ballet: Fernando Alonso, his younger brother Alberto, and Fernando's wife, Alicia Alonso.

Classical review: Naresh Sohal's 'Cosmic Dance' has more ambition than achievement in Prom 27, but Lugansky dazzles

Prom 27 – Lugansky, RSNO, Oundjian (***) / Prom 28 – Repin, RSNO, Runnicles (**)

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
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No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
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Robert Parker interview

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Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

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